Date   
Re: Deane Kidd's Estate

 

Hi Raymond,

Ex-Tek employees who used to assist Deane and his daughter determined what was junk. I have seen pictures of some of the junk so I can provide you with a second opinion: Unless you are an aluminum recycler this was JUNK!

The only one with authority to decide what happens to Deane's estate is the executor of his will. That is a legal fact. Anything else is opinion. I hope further opining on who decided what was junk stops now.

The Ex-Tek employees helping to sort out the junk are un-paid volunteers. Their goal is to get the remaining stuff on line and in the hands of people who want it. Please allow them to do what needs to be done without questioning their competence or their motives. They are doing it for altruistic reasons that will benefit many of us. As I said in my original post in this thread, the date when we might have access to Deane's parts is probably a year off,

I am sure I can find a volunteer position for you hauling away the junk if you are willing to bring a dumpster and offer your services free for the next year so you can sort, load, and transport obsolete manuals, chassis, parts, and test equipment to the dumps all day long.

One last thing: Please don't ask me if I know where the dump is, I don't know now and I don't want to know.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 9:29 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Deane Kidd's Estate

Im always in the "cringe" mide when filks say "useless junk went to the dump"

Who decided what was useless? Hams or regular unknowing civilians?

If my family had to sort mine to sell selected items, there would be no sorting

They would contract for 4 or 5 large dumpsters and chuck it all, even the 390 series stuff. Sad! I am going to get it all re-distributed soon before the SHTF.

Sent using Jedi Mind Trick!!
By
Raymond Côté
KD9CCZ

Re: Tek and Darlingtons...

 

Hi Goran,
Leakage currents in a transistor are very temperature dependent. As the temperature of the die rises the leakage current through the base will rise, resulting in a 100x current rise in the collector (if the beta was 100). This collector current rise will further heat the die resulting in more leakage. This is called Thermal Runaway. In a Darlington the beta is between 10,000 and 100,000. The base leakage results in a 10,000x increase in collector current and 10,000 greater opportunity for thermal runaway. So Darlington's are not without their problems.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 4:10 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek and Darlingtons...

Hi group,

Tek never or seldom used Darlington power transistors if I recall correctly. However, I do have a vague memory that at some application Darlingtons were used. And there was some discussion about a real or potential problem with these transistors or the application itself. Does anyone recall this and what the problem was?

Göran

------------------------------------
Posted by: mc1648pp@...
------------------------------------

Re: 43 year old 7S14 Dual Trace Dual Timebase Sampling Plugin still works

Joseph Rooney
 

I recharged mercury hearing aid batteries for my landlord's Mom when I was in technical school in 1966/7. Was able to eke out a little more life, not like new, but saved her some money.

Joe Rooney

Re: 468 DSO problem

Colin Herbert
 

From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: 15 May 2017 17:31
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] 468 DSO problem





Hi,

A few more observations and some photos.

Drat it, I should have noted that the only way that I could get the 7623A to
give a stable display was to have the 7B53A time-base switched to "AC HF
REJ" trigger coupling.

Colin.

Re: 468 DSO problem

Colin Herbert
 

Hi,

A few more observations and some photos.



From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: 09 May 2017 16:48
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 468 DSO problem





On 09 May 2017 12:36:06 +0000, you wrote:

My 468 DSO, which I am slowly going through the calibration procedure
with, is showing a problem or two.

I initially thought that checking all of the calibration would point out
the first observed problem. When in "storage mode", the triggering is less
than perfect, in that the first cycle of any waveform doesn't get displayed
properly or consistently, so the front or the display is bad. If I choose to
display "pre-trigger" the display doesn't respond to show more cycles.

Is it the triggering which is the problem or the recording or display
of the first part of the waveform or the part of the waveform before
the trigger which is the problem?

I think it is actually the display of the first part of the waveform, since
you mention it. I will try to take a photo, but with the scope set up in its
"servicing position", it is a bit tricky to find enough room to do so in my
"office". The other thing that I have already mentioned is that the display
is pretty much the same whether the "storage window" is set to "pre-trig" or
"post-trig". This is what originally lead me to think that the fault was
with the triggering.


If the last part of the waveform is stable, then the trigger is
working fine.

Yes, the last part of the waveform is stable.


I have now got to the point where I am checking the voltages on the
storage power-supply. Most of the test-points are showing voltages which are
within the acceptable range (isn't TP148, the +12V, a pain to access?). The
one that isn't correct is TP315 (+5V). The +5V is ok, but the noise is far
too much. If I use "AC HF REJ" triggering on the test scope (my 7623A with a
7A18 and 7B53A), I can see a wave-form that looks like it should be from the
manual, but there is a lot of noise on the signal. Since this is a supply
for the storage circuits, could this be the cause of the poor triggering in
"store" modes?

How much is "far too much"? +5 volt logic can tolerate 10s to 100s of
millivolts of noise. Quantitative measurements are important.

I have posted two photos of the signal on TP315, which is the +5VDC logic.
They were taken on my 7623A, using the 7B53A time-base and the 7A26 vertical
amplifier set to 20MHz bandwidth. The probe used was a Pioneer P6300, x10,
300MHz, 1 metre long one with the readout pin (earth lead 15cm long). One
photo is taken in non-store mode and one in storage mode. Oddly enough, I
could see little or no difference in the signal with the probe earth-lead
unconnected, connected to the chassis, connected to the "signal ground" on
the storage power-supply board, or to the grounded end of capacitor C162.
They are showing less than 100mV of "ripple" and noise.


What is the exact average value? It is worse to be on the low side
than the high side of the nominal value when powering logic.



The values that I measured with my (not recently calibrated) Fluke 175 DMM
are:

TP148 (+12V) +11.89V measured

TP315 (+5V) +4.937 measured

TP520 (-12V) -12.14V measured

TP518 (-6V) -6.015V measured.


The peak-to-peak value of noise is what counts and it is normally
measured with a 20MHz bandwidth which is why the 7A26 is preferred to
the 7A18 for these measurements; the faster vertical amplifier has a
20MHz bandwidth function. This is difficult to measure on a
non-storage oscilloscope but your 7623A in storage mode should be
great; I use my 2232 DSO for this but my 7834 would also work.

I think the photos are showing just less than two divisions, or 100mV,
including the "ripple" and noise. The 468 manual suggests either 465B or 475
as test oscilloscopes, both using 10X probes. No mention of 20MHz bandwidth
there, which is why I didn't think it a good idea - but it certainly is.
Again, the manual falls a bit short.

There is a complication when making these measurements using an
oscilloscope involving the probes.

The ground loop between the measurement point and the oscilloscope can
make the noise measurement greater than it really is. This can be
checked by first connecting the probes tip to the same point as the
ground lead; ideally the result should be nothing but in practice,
some noise will be present. Also run your hand along the probe cable
to see if the noise level changes.

If a long ground lead is used, it can pick up magnetic flux leakage
like that which would come from a poorly shielded switching power
supply inductor or transformer. Keep the lead close to the probe body
to help with this.

See what I've said above about the probe and its ground lead and the fact
that it doesn't seem to matter where the ground-lead is connected, in this
case.


Looking at the circuit diagram (schematic) of the A19 time base power
supply board, TP315 is on the junction of C162 (390uF, 15VDC electrolytic),
VR258 (5.6V, 0.4W Zener diode and Q157 (200V, 8.0A transistor - for a +5V
supply?). Could any of these be causing the noise? I am inclined to think
that C162 must have failed, otherwise I would have thought that it would
eliminate this noise, but where is it coming from in the first place?
Perhaps another component has failed and the noise generated has killed
C162?
Any ideas? It looks like a right fiddly job to get access to the back of
the A19 time-base power supply board, but I suppose if I have to....
Colin.
This would have been easier to find if you had included "schematic
21".

I agree. I had enough bother trying to find the schematic myself, so I
should have noted the schematic number. I apologise. I find this particular
Manual one of the worst I have ever seen from Tektronix. It is all over the
place and difficult to understand and negotiate.


C162 is the prime suspect for excessive noise on the +5 volt digital
supply. C175 is also important and once access is gained, I would
change all of the aluminum electrolytic capacitors on the board.

VR258 is part of the over voltage protection circuit with SCR Q157 and
has nothing to do with voltage regulation. If the regulator fails
shorting the input to the output, then the SCR fires blowing fuses
F4007 and F4009.

Aha, now I (think I) understand. Thanks.

The regulator circuit built around U570 and U566B is one of my
favorites. The 7905 (79052 normally used to produce -5.2 volts for
ECL?) is operating as a protected pass element for a standard
operational amplifier regulator allowing a precision tracking output.

More eye-opening stuff for me. Again, thanks.







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Re: Deane Kidd's Estate

Raymond Cote
 

Im always in the "cringe" mide when filks say "useless junk went to the dump"
Who decided what was useless? Hams or regular unknowing civilians?
If my family had to sort mine to sell selected items, there would be no sorting

They would contract for 4 or 5 large dumpsters and chuck it all, even the 390 series stuff. Sad! I am going to get it all re-distributed soon before the SHTF.



Sent using Jedi Mind Trick!!
By
Raymond Côté
KD9CCZ

On May 14, 2017, at 18:49, John Griessen @jgriessen<mailto:@jgriessen> [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...<mailto:TekScopes@...>> wrote:

On 05/14/2017 05:40 PM, 'Dennis Tillman' @Dennis_Tillman_W7PF<mailto:@Dennis_Tillman_W7PF> [TekScopes] wrote:
a ton of obsolete stuff

Does obsolete mean 500 SERIES?

Re: Tek and Darlingtons...

Albert Otten
 

Hi Göran,

A Darlington was used in some readout circuits, but not for power there. For instance Q516 in 7S11.

Albert


---In TekScopes@..., <mc1648pp@...> wrote :

Hi group,
Tek never or seldom used Darlington power transistors if I recall correctly. However, I do have a vague memory that at some application Darlingtons were used. And there was some discussion about a real or potential problem with these transistors or the application itself. Does anyone recall this and what the problem was?



Göran

Re: 43 year old 7S14 Dual Trace Dual Timebase Sampling Plugin still works

Roger Evans
 

I am not suggesting that anyone would seriously want to do this but ...

7S11 number 1 in right vertical slot
7S11 number 2 in A timebase slot
7T11 in B timebase slot
Display right vertical and A timebase

Result, a very expensive and difficult to use X-Y sampling display (just tried it in a 7904). The ability to time shift either 7S11 might conceivably be useful but otherwise just adds another unknown.

Otherwise I completely agree, the 7S14 is a lot easier to use.

Roger

Tek and Darlingtons...

Göran Krusell
 

Hi group,
Tek never or seldom used Darlington power transistors if I recall correctly. However, I do have a vague memory that at some application Darlingtons were used. And there was some discussion about a real or potential problem with these transistors or the application itself. Does anyone recall this and what the problem was?



Göran

Re: 7854 strange zener diode fault in -5V auxilliary regulator

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

The investigations were very time consuming because of the nasty location of board A7, but also
because I didn't want to use a soldering iron unless strictly needed. I only had to solder in a
new zener
diode.



Albert
Wow - well done! Weird behaviour in a Zener - who would have thought.

Craig

7854 strange zener diode fault in -5V auxilliary regulator

Albert Otten
 

My 7854 developed more and more the following symptom. At startup the self test and readout display alternately was normal (about 0.5 s) and collapsed (about 0.2 s). The normal display periods then slowly got longer and eventually became the stable situation. The collapsed display showed the texts compressed around the vertical center line and also but less compressed in horizontal direction.

The -5V line at the amp boards appeared to be intermittent the same way. I first thought of current protection action somewhere. I checked several capacitors in circuit and measured currents delivered by auxiliary regulator board A7, schematic <38>. Board A7 is buried behind those 5 boards at the right-upper side which had to be removed and reinstalled several times so I could attach wires to some components for measurements. There were no obvious current problems.

Then I realized that the off periods were very short compared to the 1 s mentioned in the manual. This made the overvoltage circuit suspect, though -5V was never exceeded. It cost me again hours to finally be 100% sure that the 5.1V zener diode VR55 was the culprit. During on periods the -5V was rock stable. But the voltage across VR55 would slowly decrease and after 0.5 s get less than 4.3 V and trigger the rest of the protection circuit and switch off the -5V during 0.2 s. But the voltage decrease across VR55 would get slower and slower and after some periods not fall below 4.3 V anymore -- the -5V becoming permanent thereafter. Then the zener voltage would increase slowly (in a few minutes) to about 5 V.
Later on, using my 576, I could see the strange big changes in the I-V curve of the zener during the first seconds and slower change to normal in a few minutes. Not really normal however,

still with a loop pattern in the lower part of the curve (not present with a good zener diode).

The investigations were very time consuming because of the nasty location of board A7, but also because I didn't want to use a soldering iron unless strictly needed. I only had to solder in a new zener diode.



Albert

Re: Deane Kidd's Estate

Tom Gardner
 

It may be worth thinking about what will happen to all our precious collections in a few years time. Our children have their own lives to lead, are probably more than fully occupied, and will have to deal with many extra unfamiliar tasks at a stressful time.

My daughter has explicitly said she will take everything to the tip. I've pointed out how much an 18GHz attenuator fetches on ebay, which caused raised eyebrows - but even then I'm not sure it will change anything.

I know of someone with a large shed/outbuilding of working HP/test equipment (a real Aladdin's man cave), who is slowly disposing of stuff on ebay, to reduce the strain on his sons.

The local hackspace regularly gets scopes donated. Mostly these are 20MHz tat, but the latest two are a Telequipment DM63 (works except that the trace is intensity modulated by the mains) and a nice little Tek 2245.

I'm having to think about what I will do with my mother's full house, and it isn't simple. The collection of Black Forest bears will be auctioned, but that's the easy bit...

Re: On the subject of 575's ...

Tam Hanna
 

Raper's project. => A project, to the honor of a client who has the customer code Raper.

Sadly, I am not allowed to say what it is or who it is. Unless you work in a school district or a bus company, or have friends who work in a school district or in a bus company. Then, contact me off-list if you want to save your company a lot of money, and for a school, also increase security of students being transported!

Tam

--
With best regards
Tam Hanna
---

NEW: Enjoy electronics? Like seeing oscilloscopes get repaired? Please subscribe to my new YouTube channel -> http://www.youtube.com/user/MrTamhan

Remote for Tek scope 7514

Gary Robert Bosworth
 

Does anyone know the Model Number of the Remote for the Tek 7514 Storage scope? There is no mention of it in the User and Service Manual. I need either the manual for the Remote, or a schematic so that I can make my own.

Re: Deane Kidd's Estate

 

I believe it means hollow chassis with no CRTs that have been out in the
rain for years and 560 series chassis that have been partially stripped and
non Tek equipment that hasn't been used since Marconi was a boy.

It's only worth is for its aluminum scrap value.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 4:49 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Deane Kidd's Estate

On 05/14/2017 05:40 PM, 'Dennis Tillman' @Dennis_Tillman_W7PF [TekScopes]
wrote:
a ton of obsolete stuff
Does obsolete mean 500 series?


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

43 year old 7S14 Dual Trace Dual Timebase Sampling Plugin still works

 

One of my 7S14s was made in early 1974 based on the IC date codes in it.



I plugged it in yesterday to confirm that the mercury cells were dead before
I replaced them with new Silver Oxide cells.

To my surprise the plugin appeared to work perfectly when I applied signal
to both channels.

The risetime on both channels was 350pSec and the falltime was ~600pSec (the
trailing edge of the pulse generator is not as sharp as the rising edge).

That means the original mercury cells have lasted 43 years!

I thought this wasn't possible so I measured the in-circuit voltage of the 4
cells (from the bottom to the top of the plugin).

1.383V Channel 2 bottom of the plugin

1.368V Channel 2

1.384V Channel 1

0.003V Channel 1 top of the plugin



The top cell is completely dead. After replacing the PC Board that covers
the sampling head cavity Channel 1 did not work. I suspect I might have
disturbed the dead battery and caused this malfunction myself. It is even
possible I somehow killed the cell when I was trying to measure its voltage
but I don't think I did that.



Next I replaced the dead cell with a silver-oxide 303 cell (same form factor
as the original mercury cells) that has a very flat discharge curve which
could last up to 7 years. I will be monitoring the cell I replaced to see
how long it lasts.



Once again both channels of the plugin worked perfectly.



Does anyone know what those things that appear to be surface mount
capacitors on the PC board that forms the cover of the sampling head cavity
are? I didn't think surface mount technology existed in 1974 but it sure
looks like that is what they are.



One last commentary about why everyone should own a 7S14. Unlike the 7S11 /
7T11 combination which is fickle and requires at least a half hour of
fiddling to get it to work, the 7S14 was designed to work almost exactly
like a conventional dual trace amplifier. It has two identical channels
which is equivalent to two 7S11s and two sampling heads with a 7T11 so it is
economical. There is very little to learn or do before you are able to run
a 7S14 and acquire sub-nSec signals. It has a dual timebase built in which
works exactly like the one in a 7B53A, etc. The fastest sweep speed is
100pSec/Div. Finally there are a few things a 7S11/7T11 can't do that the
7S14 can do: It can add channel 1 to channel 2, and it can display the two
channels in XY mode.

Re: Deane Kidd's Estate

John Griessen
 

On 05/14/2017 05:40 PM, 'Dennis Tillman' @Dennis_Tillman_W7PF [TekScopes] wrote:
a ton of obsolete stuff
Does obsolete mean 500 series?

Deane Kidd's Estate

 

I have more information now. It is promising, but this will probably take
about a year before we will see tangible results.



* The leak in the roof has been repaired (for now).

* There are two helpers cleaning out truly obsolete (and worthless) stuff so
they can make some room.

* The database that was developed a few years ago, which has the part
numbers and locations of several thousand parts, is intact and it can be put
in service at the right time.

* Once a ton of obsolete stuff has been hauled off to the dumps there is
some hope that the database will be put on line and the parts that have been
entered into the database will be made available to Tek equipment owners.



That is all I have been told.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

Re: Deane Kidd, was RE: Re: 575 curve tracer on UK eBay

ykochcal
 

I did not know Dean, and Not to offer someone else help.

But

It would seem to me that a different approach might be:

Have someone who knew her granddad from a place like the Tek museum in
Washington offer to accept a donation each year that could offset her taxes
each year,
The Museum could have the Deane Kidd Tek restoration room/project.

That could provide volunteer labor,
Allow a removal over a reasonable time.
Could be done with out cherry picking.
The Museum could use/keep some parts for restoration
And the sale of other parts could create a small funding stream while
keeping old Tek stuff alive.

Have the parts be put to use in a way that would seem was most consistent
with Dean's life.

And not a personal money gain for one individual.

It may not be about the money

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2017 5:17 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: RE: Deane Kidd, was RE: [TekScopes] Re: 575 curve tracer on UK eBay

My GUESS is that she inherited enough money that she doesn't care about the
stuff her grandfather had. Eventually the house will fall down (it has been
neglected by her and there are leaks in it already) and she will move to
someplace else. The land will appreciate as the house and its contents
continue to depreciate. The land will appreciate faster than the house
depreciates so why should she care about the house and its contents. In the
end she can sell the land to a developer who will haul it all away.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2017 10:00 AM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: Deane Kidd, was RE: [TekScopes] Re: 575 curve tracer on UK eBay

Is there any sense as to why she hasn't sold? That would be a key factor in
understanding what to do with the parts.

DaveD

On 5/13/2017 8:42 AM, 'Dennis Tillman' @Dennis_Tillman_W7PF [TekScopes]
wrote:

TO ANYONE WHO THINKS THIS IS A GOOD IDEA:

What is your ultimate goal? I believe the answer to that question is
you want a source of replacement parts at a reasonable price. The
picture is very different when you take into account what steps are
necessary before you can sell a single part. Here are some of the
critical questions you need to consider and put a price to as I did.

I heard a RUMOR that there were several offers of somewhere between
$100,000
and $500,000 and they were all turned down. Let's assume $1,000,000
will get a better response.

There are about 6,000 active user accounts in TekScopes. We have about
4,000
ACTIVE members. Of that 4,000 assume that about half are maintaining
Tek equipment for which Deane has parts. There is no point to the
other 2,000 for making a contribution if they are using more modern
Tek equipment for which Deane never had any parts.

So now if 2,000 people each contributed $500 we would reach $1,000,000
which MIGHT get her interest. Before you can make a legitimate offer
you need to know that you are buying something that is actually worth
$1,000,000.
Who is
going to do a "Due Diligence" survey of the inventory in Deane's
estate that you are going to buy with your $1,000,000. This has to be
done before you make the offer. This is necessary to determine if your
donors will ever be able to recoup their investment. That is a huge
job. Assume you do discover that Deane's estate is worth the 1 million
and that she accepts your offer.

Then what? This is where the rubber meets the road... Here are just a
few of the things you have to deal with next.

1) Where are you going to put all of the boxes?
2) What will the storage costs be per month? I would guess $10,000 per
month for 6,000 square feet of storage. That is >$100,000 per year.
Remember you are going to have to be able to get to each box if you
want to be able to sell the parts in them so you can't just cram boxes
together. You need aisles which are wasted space.
3) How will you catalog the contents of 10,000 boxes? Someone will
have to create a database application to do this so you will be able
to locate parts people want to buy.
4) What is a fair price for each item? This is probably the hardest
question to answer. Suppose you put a reasonable price on a part What
is reasonable to one person won't be reasonable to someone else. So
how do you price the parts? How do you deal with irate buyers
expecting bargain prices for obsolete parts?
5) Who will provide all the labor to move, organize, catalog and price
all the parts? The Forum members aren't going to do it. There are only
a few in the Beaverton area. So all of this will require you hire a
temporary staff.
By my seat-of-the-pants estimate this will be something between a 1
Man-Year effort and a 5 Man-year effort. That costs $30,000 to
$150,000.
6) Assuming you come up with some magic way to do all that, what comes
next?
I expect all the contributors will want something for their $500
contribution. So you will need someone to fulfil orders. That is
probably a full time job so you have a $30,000 salary to pay.
7) One more thing: How do you handle obsolescence? The parts Deane has
are for 1970s and 1980s instruments. Most of our members are now
buying newer equipment and there are no replaceable parts in these
instruments. All of Deane's inventory is decaying into obsolescence every
minute.
8) At some point the "bloom will be off the rose" and the orders for
parts won't provide enough revenue to justify a person to fill the orders.
Sometime after that the "business" or whatever you call this thing
better have been saving up for the day when they will have to pay dump
fees to get rid of all this electronic equipment.

MY CONCLUSION IS THAT THIS IS IMPRACTICAL. I HOPE YOU SEE THIS EMAIL
AS A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE TOTAL COST OF WHAT YOU ARE PROPOSING.
IN CASE IT WASN'T CLEAR BY NOW I HAVE NO INTEREST IN PURSUING THIS
MYSELF.

I AM SURE THERE ARE THOSE WHO WILL TAKE ISSUE WITH SOME OF THE
QUESTIONS I RAISE AND THE COSTS I ESTIMATED FOR SOLVING THEM. DON'T BE
DISCOURAGED BY WHAT I SAID. I HAVE BEEN WRONG MOST OF MY LIFE AND I
HAVE PLENTY OF LIFE EXPERIENCES TO SUPPORT THAT OPINION. IF SOME BRAVE
SOUL WHO IS MORE OPTIMISTIC THAN ME WANTS TO ASSUME RESPONSIBILITY FOR
THIS ENTERPRISE I WISH THEM LUCK. UNFORTUNATELY I DON'T HAVE $500
LYING AROUND TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE CAUSE.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 11:32 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: RE: Deane Kidd, was RE: [TekScopes] Re: 575 curve tracer on
UK eBay

Maybe Dennis could run a bit of Tekscopes crowdfunding and make an
offer?
I guess he'd have to have somewhere to keep it all though.
------------------------------------
Posted by: AncelB <mosaicmerc@...>
------------------------------------
That seems an excellent idea. If everyone on the Tekscopes list paid
$10 that would raise $80k, which would go a long way to extracting the
stuff and for storage.

On another and related topic, someone I know in the UK acquired a
hoard (and is progressively putting it on eBay) that includes a
complete set of many many thousands of Tektronix fiches in a special
set of filing cabinets, and is wondering what the hell to do with them
or how much they are worth.

Craig

------------------------------------
Posted by: "Craig Sawyers" <c.sawyers@...>
------------------------------------

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

Re: Deane Kidd, was RE: Re: 575 curve tracer on UK eBay

Mark Wendt
 

On 05/13/2017 08:31 PM, Artek Manuals manuals@... [TekScopes] wrote:
David et all

This might surprise you since I have sold a lot of PDF manual copies in
the last 17 years . Up until about 2 years ago I would have agreed with
you and I personally used to print out the Schematics from my PDF when
faced with an actual service situation. And while I didn't usually keep
an original after scanning the exception was any permanent member of the
bench entourage I always kept the hard cover original

As my poor eyes begin to fade and 30" monitors 2" thick have become
available for under $200 I quite enjoy the ability to view a full 11x17
schematic page just shy of 2X. Since I recently moved and redid my work
bench I now have such a monitor front and center and have stopped
killing trees :-)

Hopefully by the time I am 85 ... 54" monitors will be really cheap (
certainly headed in that direction now)

Dave
manuals@...
I've got a number of original manuals, but hardly ever use them. With the quality and sharpness of Dave's scans, I find my self using my pdf's more than anything else. Print out the appropriate schematic and take that to the workbench when I'm working on something rather than having a full hardcopy document that's the size of War and Peace taking up valuable real estate on the bench and annoyingly getting in the way. A few schematic sheets I'm not afraid to mark up in the frenzy of troubleshooting is a lot handier than trying to flip through the document when the schematics are not next door to each other page-wise in the hard copy manual.

Mark