Date   
Re: Tek 465 no display

Michael A. Terrell
 

Michael A. Terrell

-----Original Message-----
From: Jon Batters <jonbatters32@...>

Hi Michael, How is the Display Module connected to the Base Module to measure values ? Can you hook an RMS meter and an averaging and this meter in parallel to determine if this meter is an RMS model and let us know.
There is only the meter module, and a current transformer.

It is connected across the AC line, and it uses a current transformer. This is shown in a photo in the listing. I haven't tested it, yet.

None of my True RMS meters have a current reading function. They are Fluke 8920/8921/8922 series meters.

Re: - Early Telequipment 'Scope

Ken
 

Hi Adrian,

Thanks for your reply. So far, you are the only group member who has
expressed interest.

I attach photograph of the S31. You may be able to see that the input
connector has been changed (by the previous owner) to the more conventional
BNC type. Otherwise, I don't think there are any changes.

It is not obvious how the case can be removed, but it seems to be
constructed from 6 sections. I think that the rear panel must clip on
somehow and hold the sides in place which, in turn, hold the top and bottom
vented panels in place.

Hope the photo is of interest and you could certainly have the scope if you
don't mind travelling up to Yorkshire sometime. No rush, since the scope
has just been stored in the loft for the past 40 years!

Just let me know if you decide not to have it and I will also let you know
if there is any other interest.

Ken.

On 19:42, Thu, 21 Jun 2018 Adrian, <Adrian@...> wrote:

Hi Ken,

I would be interested if nobody nearer to you pops up - bit of a drive
from Eastern Anglia.

Does it have its case by any chance? Mine does not and I'm trying to
re-create one based on a very tiny, badly scanned image from a copy of a
1957 Wireless World, and struggling! All I can deduce at the moment is
that it may have been constructed more like the single '5-sided box'
design of the later S51 than the three piece 'clam shell' design of the
face-lifted S31 because it is missing all the fixing holes it would need
to hold the base part of that on. I would really appreciate a pic!

All the best, Adrian
On 6/21/2018 1:35 PM, Ken wrote:
Hi Adrian and group,

I have an early S31 model (also pre-facelift) which I would like to give
away to anyone who is interested. I also have the full, original manual
with it - including parts lists, voltages and schematics. The oscilloscope
basically works, producing a dispayed waveform from the CAL signal, but
there are some issues with X and Y shift range and timebase linearity. The
serial number on the chassis appears to 810 and the number on the
transformer is 68810.

This would have to be by collection only - location West Yorkshire, UK.
Let me know if you are interested.
Ken.





Re: Novice question - 475, what mode is this?

Bob Albert
 

Is the intensity set too low?
Bob

On Thursday, June 21, 2018, 1:45:58 PM PDT, Dmitri Shuev <dshuev@...> wrote:

Hello, everybody:

I am about to test a 475 that I have acquired for my radio alignment projects, and since I am relatively new to the oscilloscopes, I wonder if I am missing something... I am trying to replicate what I think is a Delayed Sweep combination trace, but for some reason rotating the Time/Delay Time control, and trying to move the switch point with the Delay Time Position pot does not result in the combination curve ( sample here - https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/60634/0?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0) - all I am getting is a blank on the left before the trace begins...

Am I understanding this mode correctly? Something is wrong with timebase control? Or am I missing something fundamental?

Thank you,
Dmitri

Novice question - 475, what mode is this?

Dmitri Shuev
 

Hello, everybody:

I am about to test a 475 that I have acquired for my radio alignment projects, and since I am relatively new to the oscilloscopes, I wonder if I am missing something... I am trying to replicate what I think is a Delayed Sweep combination trace, but for some reason rotating the Time/Delay Time control, and trying to move the switch point with the Delay Time Position pot does not result in the combination curve ( sample here - https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/60634/0?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0) - all I am getting is a blank on the left before the trace begins...

Am I understanding this mode correctly? Something is wrong with timebase control? Or am I missing something fundamental?

Thank you,
Dmitri

Re: Tek 465 no display

toby@...
 

On 2018-06-21 12:51 PM, musicamex@... wrote:
Albert and LolPol,

Thank you for your input. Somehow i missed this download. I found LV test points and values in section 6 of this manual. I'll report my findings this weekend when i have some time to get back to testing....maybe sooner. The monsoon season here has started and my 4 hectares eats up allot of my free time in the lab, but green is beautiful compared to dry brown winters at our 1200 m elevation.
I also found allot of info in the charts and schematics in the last part of the 465 late .pdf. The display troubleshooting will be of help hopefully once i verify my LV test points. I dont have a HV probe for my VOM and don't have the source here for the appropriate resistors to build an appropriate voltage divider, so I'm hoping the solution is something in the LV circuit.

Is there a source for pdf or other format files of the foldout pages in unchopped original layout? It would make reading them much easier. I guess that I could print/splice/tape the ones i need....
I've scanned the 465 manual with all foldouts in one piece, not
stitched. I uploaded it to Tekwiki: http://proxy.w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/465

--Toby



Thanks again! I feel the cloud lifting!

Russ



Re: 465 bad rise time

Brendan
 

This the the rise time now at 5mV. I could probably get it better but but my bnc cables and 50ohm terminator are not great quality. Should I keep working at it?

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/59361/4?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 12:00 pm, Fabio Trevisan wrote:


Hello lop pol,

I've followed up this topic from the start, without having actually jumped in,
hoping since the beginning that someone would ask or make remarks about two or
three important things (to check, or to be aware of).

1. That's a question... What type of Vertical Output board does your 465 have.
the one discrete or the one with the custom Tek IC?
It's important because the High Freq. compensation networks are different from
one type of board to the other and since your problem manifests in both
channels, there's a great likelihood the problem is located on the Vertical
Output Amplifier board, instead of on the pre-amplifier. Without that
information is difficult to advise further.

2. If your vertical amplifier is of the "Teck IC" kind, look also to the BIAS
trimpot. If the wiper is open, the amplifier may be operating on the wrong
bias point and that is supposed to impact the high-frequency performance.
Since the procedure for calibrating the bias calls for applying a 100Mhz
signal and adjusting the bias for the highest p-p display, from there we
deduct it has a marked effect on the low nanosecond time constant, which is
exactly where your issue lies.

3. Besides what Raymond already mentioned, that is not uncommon for some of
those trimmer caps fail open (I had 3 of those failed on my 464), I want to
bring to your attention that ALL the trimpots that are used on the H.F.
compensation networks are connected as "rheostats" so, a false contact or open
wiper will make any of them appear open, or in the best case, the full
trimpot's resistance, which will be just as bad for the step response.
Since many of them are in series with trimmer caps, it's easy to check them in
circuit, without needing to lift any leg, or remove any component.

Last but not least, despite your problem clearly doesn't seem to be on the
pre-amplifiers, when you find out the culprit and eventually replace one
faulty trimmer cap or faulty trimmer resistor, you will eventually need to go
through the Vertical High Frequency step response calibration, and for that,
it's important that you follow the procedure, and from your description, I
think you're already doing wrong...
While choosing for the right input level / input attenuator (pass-through) and
vertical attenuator settings, it's important to do all the High-Frequency
calibration with the oscilloscope set to the most sensitive setting... i.e.:
5mV/div (not 10mV, not 100mV... and not 200mV/div).
In other words, you need to source 25mVpp to the oscilloscope's input (for a 5
division display).
This is what will assure you that none of the high impedance input attenuators
are upsetting the subtle high frequency adjustments and artifacts.
While - in theory - the high-impedance input attenuators shouldn't degrade the
step response of the osciloscope, they're not perfect and they do cause some
minor disturbances and aberrations to the step response (and they can also be
misadjusted, something that you will only correct at a later stage) so, to
make a "clean" H.F. calibration, you need to make sure you got them (the high
impedance input attenuators) out of the way.
The only compromise to that rule is the input probe itself... If you intend to
use the oscilloscope with a particular probe (let's say, a 10:1), then you
need to connect that probe to the input, use the scope set to 5mV/div, and
apply, accordingly, a 250mVpp signal to the probe (if it's a 10:1 probe). This
will assure you will compensate in the scope, for the probe's H.F.
inaccuracies or artifacts.
Yet on this topic, you need to be sure to "source" that signal (regardless if
directly to the input or through your preferred probe), from a low impedance
source (50Ohm).
The latter is important because you don't want the frequency response of the
incoming signal to be affected by variations caused by the 'scope's input
capacitance, or your probe's input capacitance.
The lower the impedance of the source signal, the less the input capacitance
will matter and, of course, you will also want to assure the interconnect
cable is properly terminated.

Good luck with that,

Krgrds,

Fabio


On Sun, Jun 17, 2018 at 06:47 pm, lop pol wrote:


Hey guys. I have done a lot of work to this 465. I had initially planned on
selling it to help me buy some plugins for my 7633. I decided I don't want
to
sell it and am keeping it. Today I checked its rise time with a pg506 fast
rise. Both channel 1 and 2 closely resemble each other and they are not
close
to right. Before I start trying to calibrate this thing, does it look like
there is some type of component issue left to fix? I am thinking since both
channels are so alike there is something wrong besides just out of
calibration. Thanks guys.

here are some pictures

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/59361/0?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/59361/1?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0

Re: Up to date capacitor list for Tek 2465A and 2465B scopes (2018)

Tam Hanna
 

Hello,
In principle, Menachems approach works - looks like this:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BeoOIGgHRQo/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=5k1dhm10arhr


However, be careful of vibration and inductance - SMD parts tend to be better in both of these regards.
--
With best regards
Tam HANNA (emailing on a keyboard-less handset, sorry for spelling mistakes and brevity)

Re: 465 bad rise time

Fabio Trevisan
 

Hello lop pol,

I've followed up this topic from the start, without having actually jumped in, hoping since the beginning that someone would ask or make remarks about two or three important things (to check, or to be aware of).

1. That's a question... What type of Vertical Output board does your 465 have. the one discrete or the one with the custom Tek IC?
It's important because the High Freq. compensation networks are different from one type of board to the other and since your problem manifests in both channels, there's a great likelihood the problem is located on the Vertical Output Amplifier board, instead of on the pre-amplifier. Without that information is difficult to advise further.

2. If your vertical amplifier is of the "Teck IC" kind, look also to the BIAS trimpot. If the wiper is open, the amplifier may be operating on the wrong bias point and that is supposed to impact the high-frequency performance.
Since the procedure for calibrating the bias calls for applying a 100Mhz signal and adjusting the bias for the highest p-p display, from there we deduct it has a marked effect on the low nanosecond time constant, which is exactly where your issue lies.

3. Besides what Raymond already mentioned, that is not uncommon for some of those trimmer caps fail open (I had 3 of those failed on my 464), I want to bring to your attention that ALL the trimpots that are used on the H.F. compensation networks are connected as "rheostats" so, a false contact or open wiper will make any of them appear open, or in the best case, the full trimpot's resistance, which will be just as bad for the step response.
Since many of them are in series with trimmer caps, it's easy to check them in circuit, without needing to lift any leg, or remove any component.

Last but not least, despite your problem clearly doesn't seem to be on the pre-amplifiers, when you find out the culprit and eventually replace one faulty trimmer cap or faulty trimmer resistor, you will eventually need to go through the Vertical High Frequency step response calibration, and for that, it's important that you follow the procedure, and from your description, I think you're already doing wrong...
While choosing for the right input level / input attenuator (pass-through) and vertical attenuator settings, it's important to do all the High-Frequency calibration with the oscilloscope set to the most sensitive setting... i.e.: 5mV/div (not 10mV, not 100mV... and not 200mV/div).
In other words, you need to source 25mVpp to the oscilloscope's input (for a 5 division display).
This is what will assure you that none of the high impedance input attenuators are upsetting the subtle high frequency adjustments and artifacts.
While - in theory - the high-impedance input attenuators shouldn't degrade the step response of the osciloscope, they're not perfect and they do cause some minor disturbances and aberrations to the step response (and they can also be misadjusted, something that you will only correct at a later stage) so, to make a "clean" H.F. calibration, you need to make sure you got them (the high impedance input attenuators) out of the way.
The only compromise to that rule is the input probe itself... If you intend to use the oscilloscope with a particular probe (let's say, a 10:1), then you need to connect that probe to the input, use the scope set to 5mV/div, and apply, accordingly, a 250mVpp signal to the probe (if it's a 10:1 probe). This will assure you will compensate in the scope, for the probe's H.F. inaccuracies or artifacts.
Yet on this topic, you need to be sure to "source" that signal (regardless if directly to the input or through your preferred probe), from a low impedance source (50Ohm).
The latter is important because you don't want the frequency response of the incoming signal to be affected by variations caused by the 'scope's input capacitance, or your probe's input capacitance.
The lower the impedance of the source signal, the less the input capacitance will matter and, of course, you will also want to assure the interconnect cable is properly terminated.

Good luck with that,

Krgrds,

Fabio

On Sun, Jun 17, 2018 at 06:47 pm, lop pol wrote:


Hey guys. I have done a lot of work to this 465. I had initially planned on
selling it to help me buy some plugins for my 7633. I decided I don't want to
sell it and am keeping it. Today I checked its rise time with a pg506 fast
rise. Both channel 1 and 2 closely resemble each other and they are not close
to right. Before I start trying to calibrate this thing, does it look like
there is some type of component issue left to fix? I am thinking since both
channels are so alike there is something wrong besides just out of
calibration. Thanks guys.

here are some pictures

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/59361/0?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/59361/1?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0

Re: Tek 465 no display

Shannon Hill
 

Look in the Databases section of this group for manoman.sqhill.com links; there you'll find lots of Tek manuals, all with "stitched" schematics.

Re: - Early Telequipment 'Scope

Adrian
 

Hi Ken,

I would be interested if nobody nearer to you pops up - bit of a drive from Eastern Anglia.

Does it have its case by any chance? Mine does not and I'm trying to re-create one based on a very tiny, badly scanned image from a copy of a 1957 Wireless World, and struggling! All I can deduce at the moment is that it may have been constructed more like the single '5-sided box' design of the later S51 than the three piece 'clam shell' design of the face-lifted S31 because it is missing all the fixing holes it would need to hold the base part of that on. I would really appreciate a pic!

All the best, Adrian

On 6/21/2018 1:35 PM, Ken wrote:
Hi Adrian and group,

I have an early S31 model (also pre-facelift) which I would like to give away to anyone who is interested. I also have the full, original manual with it - including parts lists, voltages and schematics. The oscilloscope basically works, producing a dispayed waveform from the CAL signal, but there are some issues with X and Y shift range and timebase linearity. The serial number on the chassis appears to 810 and the number on the transformer is 68810.

This would have to be by collection only - location West Yorkshire, UK. Let me know if you are interested.
Ken.

Re: Tek 465 no display

musicamex
 

Albert and LolPol,

Thank you for your input. Somehow i missed this download. I found LV test points and values in section 6 of this manual. I'll report my findings this weekend when i have some time to get back to testing....maybe sooner. The monsoon season here has started and my 4 hectares eats up allot of my free time in the lab, but green is beautiful compared to dry brown winters at our 1200 m elevation.
I also found allot of info in the charts and schematics in the last part of the 465 late .pdf. The display troubleshooting will be of help hopefully once i verify my LV test points. I dont have a HV probe for my VOM and don't have the source here for the appropriate resistors to build an appropriate voltage divider, so I'm hoping the solution is something in the LV circuit.

Is there a source for pdf or other format files of the foldout pages in unchopped original layout? It would make reading them much easier. I guess that I could print/splice/tape the ones i need....

Thanks again! I feel the cloud lifting!

Russ

Re: Up to date capacitor list for Tek 2465A and 2465B scopes (2018)

 

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 09:37 am, machineguy59 wrote:
OUCH!! Yahoo email to groups.io lost context. So here is the message again.

Menahem,
Thanks for the information. I was not clear in expressing my concern. I will clarify my problem. The A5 boards I have suffered severe electrolyte damage. One of them (my current project) lost three pads and two traces to the etching of spilled electrolyte. I replace these pads with pads cut from foil and glued to the board with CW2500 epoxy. You can see an example of this process here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vx50YtEC2S8

Although my hand cut pads are not as perfect as his machine cut pads. I get pretty close. Also, my hand cut traces are not as narrow as original. I will try to post pictures of my work next time I have the scope opened up. I did not take "before" pictures. Its tedious but it works and saves the board without using jumper wires or gluing parts to the board. My concern is that CW2500 epoxy is great stuff but still not as good as original for strength. The weight of a leaded part leveraged by the leads would very likely wrench my replacement pads from the board.

Re: Up to date capacitor list for Tek 2465A and 2465B scopes (2018)

 

Menahem,Thanks for the information.  I was not clear in expressing my concern.  I will clarify my problem.  The A5 boards I have suffered severe electrolyte damage.  One of them (my current project) lost three pads and two traces to the etching of spilled electrolyte.  I replace these pads with pads cut from foil and glued to the board with CW2500 epoxy.  You can see an example of this process here:  PCB solder pad repair & corrosion clean up - The epoxy method  

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
PCB solder pad repair & corrosion clean up - The epoxy method

This is a demonstration of a PCB repair which involves repairing damaged surface mount solder pads as well as cl...
|

|

|


Although my hand cut pads are not as perfect as his machine cut pads.  I get pretty close.  Also, my hand cut traces are not as narrow as original.  I did not take "before" pictures.  Its tedious but it works and saves the board without using jumper wires or gluing parts to the board.  My concern is that CW2500 epoxy is great stuff but still not as good as original for strength.  The weight of a leaded part leveraged by the leads would very likely wrench my replacement pads from the board.  I will try to post pictures of my work next time I have the scope opened up.

On ‎Thursday‎, ‎June‎ ‎21‎, ‎2018‎ ‎05‎:‎15‎:‎13‎ ‎AM‎ ‎CDT, M Yachad <@yachadm> wrote:

Ron

"I don't think the repair pads will do well with a leaded cap hanging on it."

I have done many PCB repairs, replacing the SMD components with Leaded.

See here:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=60615

This is of a Bose Music system - CD-Control PCB - before and after. There is very little vertical clearance, so they lay horizontal. The SMD pads are more than large enough to accommodate the soldered leads, and as long as the soldering is kept to the same standards as for SMD caps (less than 2 secs, at 270°C), there is no danger of lifting the pads.

This is my standard way of working with SMD PCB's now; same process on all the TV T-Con PCB's which I work on (TV PSU PCB's are still Through-Hole).
I find it super-reliable, even if it won't win any aesthetics awards, and have not experienced any comebacks at all, on any of the hundreds of SMD PCB's which I have overhauled in this way.

Speaking of capacitor problems - it's not always their fault

Ed Breya
 

With all this capacitor talk, I thought I'd relate a recent experience in patching up a consumer item. When I took the shot CRT from that AT5005 SA recently discussed here, to drop off at the recycling place, I noticed a guy lugging a medium sized LCD TV out of his car. I was going to offer help in chucking it in the bin, but instead said I could take it - it looked pretty decent as a possible spare TV. He said it had a problem with the sound. So, it went into my truck instead of to certain destruction. With stuff like this, I can take a quick shot at fixing, but if no good, I'll strip out some parts, and it ends up with the same fate on my next trip to recycling.

I powered it up, and quickly found that the "trouble with the sound" was that the volume level insisted on going to maximum, regardless of pushing the buttons on the small local control panel on the side. No other functions worked - it was locked up because the volume up button seemed to be stuck. I figured that a cap leaked somewhere and faulted the control interface. I opened it up and found the insides quite clean, and there were no obvious signs of problems with any of the usual suspects - the Al electrolytic caps. In fact, there are none on the little button board, or anywhere around the uP periphery that could be blamed for messing up the button signals. I pulled the button board, and it seemed OK - the buttons all had good snap action. The only thing a little weird was the solder mask looked kind of flakey, so maybe there was some leakage. I was going to try washing it, but decided to first make some resistance measurements for before and after comparison. I was shocked to find that the real problem was the buttons themselves. Five out of the seven had various low resistances in their "open" state - some so low that the R didn't even change when pushed. I have never seen a problem in one of these kind of buttons before, that wasn't an obvious mechanical failure.

Fortunately, I had some of the right kind in stock, so did the replacements, put it all back together, and voila, it all worked - sound too.

The lesson here is that it's not necessarily always or only cap problems. I was lucky on this one, because if there were any cap problems too, it could have led to a wild goose chase fooling around with them, only to ultimately encounter the button issue. After exhausting most of my patience on caps, I likely would have assumed it was still cap juice somewhere, rather than closely looking at those buttons, and the unit would have been tossed.

Ed

Re: - Early Telequipment 'Scope

Ken
 

Hi Adrian and group,

I have an early S31 model (also pre-facelift) which I would like to give away to anyone who is interested. I also have the full, original manual with it - including parts lists, voltages and schematics. The oscilloscope basically works, producing a dispayed waveform from the CAL signal, but there are some issues with X and Y shift range and timebase linearity. The serial number on the chassis appears to 810 and the number on the transformer is 68810.

This would have to be by collection only - location West Yorkshire, UK. Let me know if you are interested.
Ken.

Re: CRT in Tek 2235

georgeK KB1HFT <george.kavanagh@...>
 

Bert:
Do you have a CRT that will fit my needs? Sphere does not.

I do not get to see your email address in the "digest view" of the group for which I had opted.
Please post again so I can grab your email address.

Thanks!

I've decided what last Tek equipment I want to restore.

Pete Lancashire
 

I've decided what last Tek equipment I want to restore. They are the
components that made up a S3100 series tester. That would complete my full
circle from when I worked on Tektronix test systems starting in 1974.

The S3100 is made up of the R230, R568, 3T6, 3S6. And then for programming
the R240/241. If you had more money than anybody else there was even a drum
memory the R250.

If you have or know somebody that has any of the buff they're willing to
sell trade donate etc please let me know. I am located in Portland Oregon
USA.

-pete

FS: 17 lb. Power Transformer for Tek 545A

David Berlind
 

Over on the Facebook Vintage Electronics Group, a group member has posted that he has a transformer for a Tek 545A. Here's the text of his post. I have purchased 3 items from this seller before and he is very trustworthy.

Text of post:

This beast is Tek part no. 120-120, the power transformer for the 545A 'scope. It weighs 17 pounds, has 12 secondary windings, and other than scratches on the case looks unused.

I got it a few years ago when I was thinking about building a beefy audio power amp. Combined, the four high-voltage windings will supply more than 650 volts and run cool at 400 mA. It has seven 6.3 VAC windings, two rated at 8 amps, one at 6 amps, two at 4 amps, one at 1 amp and one with no rating I can find.

I've checked all windings and they're good.

I want to pass it along to somebody who will make use of it. I paid something like $45, as I recall. I'll sell it for $20 plus shipping. It will fit into a medium Flat Rate Box ($13.65), for a total of $33.65. Add a buck if paying by PayPal. Pickup in the Maryland suburbs of Washington DC would be fine.

I'll include a table that calls out all the windings by lug number, voltage based on the 545A schematic, resistance, estimate current and power rating, and estimated loss.

Re: Up to date capacitor list for Tek 2465A and 2465B scopes (2018)

 

Ron

"I don't think the repair pads will do well with a leaded cap hanging on it."

I have done many PCB repairs, replacing the SMD components with Leaded.

See here:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=60615

This is of a Bose Music system - CD-Control PCB - before and after. There is very little vertical clearance, so they lay horizontal. The SMD pads are more than large enough to accommodate the soldered leads, and as long as the soldering is kept to the same standards as for SMD caps (less than 2 secs, at 270°C), there is no danger of lifting the pads.

This is my standard way of working with SMD PCB's now; same process on all the TV T-Con PCB's which I work on (TV PSU PCB's are still Through-Hole).
I find it super-reliable, even if it won't win any aesthetics awards, and have not experienced any comebacks at all, on any of the hundreds of SMD PCB's which I have overhauled in this way.

Re: Tek 465 no display

Albert Otten
 

Hi Russ,
You may have overlooked my message #149053 saying

"You probably downloaded more manuals now (as indicated by Dennis) if you hadn't done so already. Note that you need the manual corresponding to your S/N, below or above B250000, though the later manual shows more voltage and waveform details which may or may not be applicable to the earlier version.
The requirements for regulated voltages are always in the first steps of a calibration procedure; same here.
It's difficult to find the proper pages in the pdfs compared to paper manuals. Strange enough the tab "Adjustment Locations 1" in my late manual shows arrows pointing to all LV test points whereas these are missing (except +55 V) in some or all pdfs Fig. 8-19. You might consult Fig. 8-18, pdf page 236 in "tektronix_465_oscilloscope_full_sm.pdf"."

You'll have to do with the available B25-up manual. There may be some minor changes in your B317000 'scope which are not yet shown in that manual, but for the present purpose don't bother about that.
As said the LV requirements are always in the calibration section, here pdf page 78 of "tektronix_465_oscilloscope_full_sm.pdf".
The test point locations are shown (very vaguely) in the board layout I mentioned, Fig. 8-18. Note also that the table of board grid locations below the figure. Mostly theseTPs are indicated at the board itself with description or number, like "+15V" or "TP1234".

Albert

On Wed, Jun 20, 2018 at 05:44 pm, <musicamex@...> wrote:


Lol pol,

Thanks for the reply. Do you know where I can find a list of the lv test
points and what they should read?