Date   

Re: voltage limit of CA plugin

Nenad Filipovic
 

No idea as well, but most likely it will be your probe that will determine
the max voltage to be worked on. That is if you're using the "usual" x10 or
higher attenuation probes like you should.

CA plugin uses a 600V capacitor for the AC input mode (which is what you'd
be using to measure ripple). Given the age of any CA today, I'd derate that
somewhat.

Tek P6007 or P6009 probes (x100, 1.5kV) would be suitable for your
application and most work on tube circuits. For low freq work like mains
ripple you might even improvise one using multiple resistors in series.

Best Regards,
Nenad

On Sat, Feb 1, 2020 at 6:54 AM Jamie Ostrowski <jamie.ostrowski@...>
wrote:



Does anyone know what the upper voltage limit is on the CA plugins? I
couldn't find the spec in the manual, and I'm interested in measuring
ripple in a 550 VDC power supply so I want to be sure I'm not overloading
anything.


Thanks,

- Jamie


voltage limit of CA plugin

Jamie Ostrowski
 

Does anyone know what the upper voltage limit is on the CA plugins? I couldn't find the spec in the manual, and I'm interested in measuring ripple in a 550 VDC power supply so I want to be sure I'm not overloading anything.


Thanks,

- Jamie


Re: Barrie Gilbert's 2007 Biographical Story

Raymond Cote
 

Great! Thanks. Ill read it.

On Jan 31, 2020, at 18:50, Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> wrote:

I placed a fascinating article about his life in our archives. It is at https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/files/Barrie%20Gilbert%20Biography%20IEEE%20SSCN%20News%20Fall%202007.pdf

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mlynch001
Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 6:46 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Barrie Gilbert has passed away

Dennis,

I had just recently finished reading Barrie's Biography in the IEEE SSCS NEWS from 2007, a supremely fascinating story. This would be a good starting place for anyone wanting to learn more about Mr. Gilbert. I am not sure that the term "giant" comes close to what this man has meant to mankind as a whole. His contributions will live on, probably for centuries? This is a sad day for us all.

Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator



Barrie Gilbert's 2007 Biographical Story

 

I placed a fascinating article about his life in our archives. It is at https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/files/Barrie%20Gilbert%20Biography%20IEEE%20SSCN%20News%20Fall%202007.pdf

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mlynch001
Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 6:46 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Barrie Gilbert has passed away

Dennis,

I had just recently finished reading Barrie's Biography in the IEEE SSCS NEWS from 2007, a supremely fascinating story. This would be a good starting place for anyone wanting to learn more about Mr. Gilbert. I am not sure that the term "giant" comes close to what this man has meant to mankind as a whole. His contributions will live on, probably for centuries? This is a sad day for us all.

Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Barrie Gilbert has passed away

nonIonizing EMF
 

On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 06:01 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:


I lost a friend! We lost a giant analog IC designer! Barrie passed away
after a fall yesterday.
Wow! I literally watched w2aew's video on the Gilbert Cell maybe three days ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nmmb0pqTU0

I've been studying the various mixer, divider and multiplier circuit designs... from the AD datasheets circuit references on the AD831 as well as Mini-Circuits ADE-1 and ADE-24MH. Those datasheets are what got me inquiring more.

Not to sound paranoid... though I'd be rationally paranoid when the U.S. is at War and our domestic policy let's anyone in the World come in with remote sensing and remote transmission systems. I'm hoping there isn't an alarming trend that is being written off as "baby boomers" causation.

Seems there isn't as much an interest in our National Intelligence Brain Trust as much as the National Security Internal Affairs National Security farce compounding and concealing remote sensing and remote transmission poaching that the latest CBS News 60 Minutes report barely detailed and others have been advocating threat awareness of the imminent threat situation then being written off invalidly.
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/brain-trauma-suffered-by-u-s-diplomats-abroad-could-be-work-of-hostile-foreign-government-60-minutes-2019-09-01/


Re: Stan Griffiths

Dave Brown
 

Tektronix closed business with their current cafeteria supplier. They chose instead over the holidays to revamp the facility and bring in a new supplier. It has opened and is quite a bit better than the previous. In fact we ate there today. I tried explaining to others (not on this forum) that they didn't close the cafeteria but were changing vendors but people like to heap on bad news. I just gave up and knew they'd figure it out when the cafeteria re-opened. Bad rumors travel far and wide. Not everything you read on the internet is true.

Dave


Re: Barrie Gilbert has passed away

Jim Ford
 

RIP, Barrie Gilbert.   He was indeed a titan of technology and a heck of a nice guy.I'm very sorry to hear of his passing.Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/31/20 6:01 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: [TekScopes] Barrie Gilbert has passed away I lost a friend! We lost a giant analog IC designer! Barrie passed awayafter a fall yesterday. I had lunch with him in October to give him a 6-gunCRT to add to his collection of unusual CRTs. At that time he was slowlyretiring from his Analog Devices laboratory in Beaverton. He is a legend in the analog IC industry. In a few short years at Tek heinvented a way to display the readout on the CRT that every scope made sincethen uses, and he invented the Gilbert Cell, Gilbert Multiplier, GilbertMixer which are all variations of each other. You probably have a GilbertMixer in your cell phone. They wouldn't be much good without it. He hashundreds of other patents as well. He was the most unassuming person I think I have ever met. He once gave atalk on where his creativity came from in my dining room. I took him to ahamfest for the very first time and tried to teach him how to haggle overthe price sticker on the old scopes he wanted to buy. After ignoring myadvice a few times he turned to me and said "I don't want to haggle. Theypay me too much and I don't know what else to do with it but give it away." Rest in peace, Senor Multiplicado! https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.electronics.design/kdz_ab4Rb9o


Re: Barrie Gilbert has passed away

G Hopper
 

Sorry to hear this news Dennis.

Fortunately his inventions will live on as a testimony to his knowledge and
contributions to society.

Grant

On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 6:01 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

I lost a friend! We lost a giant analog IC designer! Barrie passed away
after a fall yesterday. I had lunch with him in October to give him a 6-gun
CRT to add to his collection of unusual CRTs. At that time he was slowly
retiring from his Analog Devices laboratory in Beaverton.

He is a legend in the analog IC industry. In a few short years at Tek he
invented a way to display the readout on the CRT that every scope made
since
then uses, and he invented the Gilbert Cell, Gilbert Multiplier, Gilbert
Mixer which are all variations of each other. You probably have a Gilbert
Mixer in your cell phone. They wouldn't be much good without it. He has
hundreds of other patents as well.



He was the most unassuming person I think I have ever met. He once gave a
talk on where his creativity came from in my dining room. I took him to a
hamfest for the very first time and tried to teach him how to haggle over
the price sticker on the old scopes he wanted to buy. After ignoring my
advice a few times he turned to me and said "I don't want to haggle. They
pay me too much and I don't know what else to do with it but give it away."



Rest in peace, Senor Multiplicado!



https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.electronics.design/kdz_ab4Rb9o







Re: Barrie Gilbert has passed away

Mlynch001
 

Dennis,

I had just recently finished reading Barrie's Biography in the IEEE SSCS NEWS from 2007, a supremely fascinating story. This would be a good starting place for anyone wanting to learn more about Mr. Gilbert. I am not sure that the term "giant" comes close to what this man has meant to mankind as a whole. His contributions will live on, probably for centuries? This is a sad day for us all.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


Looking for TDS6804B pictures or TDS6/7000B series acquisition boards, bad or good

fc915809@...
 

Hi all,

I'm new here but some of you may know me from the eevblog forum and the TDS floppy nvram dump scripts.

Currently I'm looking for some good soul who would be willing to share very detailed component level pictures of a TDS6804B acquisition board. I had to do with a totally dishonest seller who sold me a TDS6804B where the acquisition board was stripped of quite some components. They removed a bit of everything: an ADC, an analog mux, the VCOs are gone, some MCUs ripped out, smaller passive components missing. It look like they did a try-and-error repair job and eventually gave up on it or sourced some parts from there. A complete shame, you don't give up on such wonderful equipment.

I'm also looking for any TDS6000B/7000B series acquisition boards, good or bad, free or not, which I could use as a donor, as the -B series all seem to share a lot of components and certainly the core components.

The boards for offer on Ebay are simply way too expensive for this kind of risky adventure.

So far I had no luck, but any efforts would be very highly appreciated and I can only thank in advance for any replies or efforts.

-- flyte


Re: TDS694C 50 Ohm Overload

fc915809@...
 

Two things:

- I've checked a TDS694C board here and there are two paths going into the analog preamp/mux (the row after it are the ADCs). The scope selects one or the other path according to vertical settings. On the first path it's a direct feed, the other path is routed via a 50 Ohm load network for the larger signals. The latter path is selected by default when powered off, so it will read 50 Ohm. But only starting after the second relay in the chain, as the first relay will be open to the BNC input. Relay schematic is printed on top of them. On the first path, low signal, first contact point from the analog preamp/mux, I measure 57.2 Ohm to GND, and on the second path with resistive network I get 26.7 Ohm to GND, with the scope totally switched off. The relays should be easy to check when powered off, isolation is high open and closed it's a very low resistance. Any other values mean trouble. You could also compare measurements between your channel and compare reading of the components. But my guess would also be on a blown analog ASIC.

- BUT: I read you are facing another problem with the NVRAM/cal constants as well. You have ExtCal errors which means it sees a problem with the constants in the EEPROMs on the acquisition board. It will have loaded defaults, so you calibration will be nonexistent. In case you can't correct the defect due to the overload, the question is whether new calibration would be able to compensate for it. Probably not in case it's really off, but you never know. One thing to do for sure is to make a dump of the NVRAM/EEPROM values, using for example the GPIB tools or the floppy dump scripts (see my reference post on EEVblog or user @ragge 's GitHub). Or read them directly from the EEPROMs if you are suspecting an interface problem. It may safer. It could be the EEPROM values are still "repairable" or can be saved, you never know.


Re: Stan Griffiths

 

I guess that means I have to have lunch with you in 2 weeks. Sigh!
Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Clark Foley
Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 6:01 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Stan Griffiths

Dennis,
You are very wrong about Tektronix. The cafeteria has indeed re-opened!
Clark





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Barrie Gilbert has passed away

Raymond Cote
 

Ill have to search his history. Sounds like an amazing guy. Thanks

On Jan 31, 2020, at 16:01, Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> wrote:

I lost a friend! We lost a giant analog IC designer! Barrie passed away
after a fall yesterday. I had lunch with him in October to give him a 6-gun
CRT to add to his collection of unusual CRTs. At that time he was slowly
retiring from his Analog Devices laboratory in Beaverton.

He is a legend in the analog IC industry. In a few short years at Tek he
invented a way to display the readout on the CRT that every scope made since
then uses, and he invented the Gilbert Cell, Gilbert Multiplier, Gilbert
Mixer which are all variations of each other. You probably have a Gilbert
Mixer in your cell phone. They wouldn't be much good without it. He has
hundreds of other patents as well.



He was the most unassuming person I think I have ever met. He once gave a
talk on where his creativity came from in my dining room. I took him to a
hamfest for the very first time and tried to teach him how to haggle over
the price sticker on the old scopes he wanted to buy. After ignoring my
advice a few times he turned to me and said "I don't want to haggle. They
pay me too much and I don't know what else to do with it but give it away."



Rest in peace, Senor Multiplicado!



https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.electronics.design/kdz_ab4Rb9o






Barrie Gilbert has passed away

 

I lost a friend! We lost a giant analog IC designer! Barrie passed away
after a fall yesterday. I had lunch with him in October to give him a 6-gun
CRT to add to his collection of unusual CRTs. At that time he was slowly
retiring from his Analog Devices laboratory in Beaverton.

He is a legend in the analog IC industry. In a few short years at Tek he
invented a way to display the readout on the CRT that every scope made since
then uses, and he invented the Gilbert Cell, Gilbert Multiplier, Gilbert
Mixer which are all variations of each other. You probably have a Gilbert
Mixer in your cell phone. They wouldn't be much good without it. He has
hundreds of other patents as well.



He was the most unassuming person I think I have ever met. He once gave a
talk on where his creativity came from in my dining room. I took him to a
hamfest for the very first time and tried to teach him how to haggle over
the price sticker on the old scopes he wanted to buy. After ignoring my
advice a few times he turned to me and said "I don't want to haggle. They
pay me too much and I don't know what else to do with it but give it away."



Rest in peace, Senor Multiplicado!



https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/sci.electronics.design/kdz_ab4Rb9o


Re: Stan Griffiths

Clark Foley
 

Dennis,
You are very wrong about Tektronix. The cafeteria has indeed re-opened!
Clark


Re: Stan Griffiths

Jim Ford
 

Nope, nobody would fly on the plane with steel in the wings!  It would never get off the ground!Sorry, but I couldn't resist. Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/31/20 3:55 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Stan Griffiths Hi Chuck,I agree with both of these insights, especially the 2nd one:<SNIP> Tektronix didn't lose their way, they lost their market, and the old guard couldn't figure out how to cope.<SNIP> Tektronix tried to address the commercial market, all the way down to the TV repairman, but the really sucked at making things cheaply, and the commercial market was very cost conscious.As you said some of their marketing failures were the result of the old guards protecting their turf. For instance: * Tek's flood gun storage technology was about to be over-run with raster technology when Tek invested heavily in a new facility to make more storage tubes.* Tek ignored FFT based spectrum analyzers for more than 10 years after they appeared and kept making swept IF spectrum analyzers.Taking a company public is like making a deal with the devil. The short term gain of the revenue this provides is like a sugar rush. But long term you end up with a headache every 3 months when you have to show a profit to your stockholders. You must spend the stock money wisely. Tek did this for a time but then they made a series of acquisitions that ended in massive losses. * Tek bought several companies (presumably for their technology) and in a matter of a few years sold them at a huge loss.* One day I had breakfast with the Tek manager who made the executive decision that there was no money to be made selling software. I'm pretty sure I know what Bill Gates would have said about that decision if I asked him but I didn't hear this until long after I left.Chuck was right about making things cheaply for the commercial market. For example Jerry Shannon drove the costs out of the TM500 plugins like Madman Muntz did for TVs in the 1940s and 1950s. When Jerry was finished squeezing the last nickel from the TM500 there was nothing on the rear of it holding it together. Sometimes it was shaped like a parallelogram instead of a rectangle in the back. The TM500 plugins exuded cheapness. Fortunately the TM5000 plugins reclaimed some of the quality that disappeared from the TM500 plugins. In addition the quality and capability of the newly announced TM5000 plugins improved steadily over time. With GPIB capability across the entire TM5000 series it was finally possible to build unique hybrid instruments from combinations of various plugins and completely automate the entire hybrid instrument.The old guard also thought Tektronix was a leading edge, high technology, high quality, oscilloscope manufacturer. They stuck up their nose at low technology products like the 5000 scope series which was specifically designed to address a cost sensitive market with high quality oscilloscopes. The devil came back to collect his fee in the late 1980s when pressure to show a profit every quarter resulted in a series of very poor decisions. Tek was now being run by professional managers who didn't have a clue what an oscilloscope was.  The management hired several Management Consulting firms to tell them ("advise them") what they should do next. I don't know what those recommendations were but it was around this time that management gave themselves golden parachutes, borrowed from the pension fund. Etc. Too late I realized that Chuck got me started on the things I learned about Tek I never would have known (or appreciated) if I accepted their offer and became an employee in 1971 (the golden age of Tek). Instead my ex-Tek friends, many who left in the late 1980s (when things were going from bad to worse) have many stories of things like this which I hear instead. A sign of how far things have come was the announcement in December that Tek was permanently closing the cafeteria. Virtually every Tek engineer met all his fellow engineers at lunch every day. So many ideas came spontaneously from those lunch encounters. This announcement was preceded by another one that management was transferring all future IC design to a company in Silicon Valley and closing their IC Design Department. I immediately thought what would happen to Boeing if one day they announced that henceforth the design of their wings was being transferred to a foundry in Pittsburg that made long steel girders. Would you fly on that plane?Dennis Tillman W7pF  -----Original Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck HarrisSent: Friday, January 31, 2020 6:26 AMTo: TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] Stan GriffithsTektronix didn't lose their way, they lost their market, and the old guard couldn't figure out how to cope.Reagan spent the Soviet Union into bankruptcy, and then shifted gears into reducing the burden on the US taxpayers.The cold war was over and there was no longer a need to keep the military at full readiness to fight another world war... so they downsized, and new R&D programs were severely reduced.The reduction of the military R&D programs meant that the companies that supplied the equipment needs of the R&D programs were seriously starved of new sales.The Military Industrial Complex's golden teat dried up, and with it went all of the luxurious ways of Tektronix, HP, and many others... even me.Tektronix tried to address the commercial market, all the way down to the TV repairman, but the really sucked at making things cheaply, and the commercial market was very cost conscious.-Chuck HarrisDennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Stan may have been a friend of Tektronix but he didn't trust the Tektronix Corporation. As the co-founder of the vintageTEK Museum he was adamant there be no connection to the corporation at all. Stan wanted to be free to show the things they got wrong, the things they were embarrassed about, and even some things they wanted to suppress. > It is my guess that he was concerned about things the corporation > began to do in the late 1980s when they lost their way, began losing > money, saw their market share shrinking, and decided they could no > longer afford their reputation for excellence. If that was the reason > for mistrust then Stan was not alone. During this period Tek decisions > were based on the recommendations of outside management consultants > rather than their own staff of brilliant engineers. Many of Tek's most > talented employees saw this as a time of great upheaval and left when > they saw the handwriting on the wall> > Dennis Tillman W7PF. -- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator


Re: Stan Griffiths

 

Hi Chuck,
I agree with both of these insights, especially the 2nd one:
<SNIP> Tektronix didn't lose their way, they lost their market, and the old guard couldn't figure out how to cope.
<SNIP> Tektronix tried to address the commercial market, all the way down to the TV repairman, but the really sucked at making things cheaply, and the commercial market was very cost conscious.

As you said some of their marketing failures were the result of the old guards protecting their turf. For instance:
* Tek's flood gun storage technology was about to be over-run with raster technology when Tek invested heavily in a new facility to make more storage tubes.
* Tek ignored FFT based spectrum analyzers for more than 10 years after they appeared and kept making swept IF spectrum analyzers.

Taking a company public is like making a deal with the devil. The short term gain of the revenue this provides is like a sugar rush. But long term you end up with a headache every 3 months when you have to show a profit to your stockholders. You must spend the stock money wisely. Tek did this for a time but then they made a series of acquisitions that ended in massive losses.
* Tek bought several companies (presumably for their technology) and in a matter of a few years sold them at a huge loss.

* One day I had breakfast with the Tek manager who made the executive decision that there was no money to be made selling software. I'm pretty sure I know what Bill Gates would have said about that decision if I asked him but I didn't hear this until long after I left.

Chuck was right about making things cheaply for the commercial market. For example Jerry Shannon drove the costs out of the TM500 plugins like Madman Muntz did for TVs in the 1940s and 1950s. When Jerry was finished squeezing the last nickel from the TM500 there was nothing on the rear of it holding it together. Sometimes it was shaped like a parallelogram instead of a rectangle in the back. The TM500 plugins exuded cheapness. Fortunately the TM5000 plugins reclaimed some of the quality that disappeared from the TM500 plugins. In addition the quality and capability of the newly announced TM5000 plugins improved steadily over time. With GPIB capability across the entire TM5000 series it was finally possible to build unique hybrid instruments from combinations of various plugins and completely automate the entire hybrid instrument.

The old guard also thought Tektronix was a leading edge, high technology, high quality, oscilloscope manufacturer. They stuck up their nose at low technology products like the 5000 scope series which was specifically designed to address a cost sensitive market with high quality oscilloscopes.

The devil came back to collect his fee in the late 1980s when pressure to show a profit every quarter resulted in a series of very poor decisions. Tek was now being run by professional managers who didn't have a clue what an oscilloscope was. The management hired several Management Consulting firms to tell them ("advise them") what they should do next. I don't know what those recommendations were but it was around this time that management gave themselves golden parachutes, borrowed from the pension fund. Etc.

Too late I realized that Chuck got me started on the things I learned about Tek I never would have known (or appreciated) if I accepted their offer and became an employee in 1971 (the golden age of Tek). Instead my ex-Tek friends, many who left in the late 1980s (when things were going from bad to worse) have many stories of things like this which I hear instead.

A sign of how far things have come was the announcement in December that Tek was permanently closing the cafeteria. Virtually every Tek engineer met all his fellow engineers at lunch every day. So many ideas came spontaneously from those lunch encounters.
This announcement was preceded by another one that management was transferring all future IC design to a company in Silicon Valley and closing their IC Design Department. I immediately thought what would happen to Boeing if one day they announced that henceforth the design of their wings was being transferred to a foundry in Pittsburg that made long steel girders. Would you fly on that plane?

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck Harris
Sent: Friday, January 31, 2020 6:26 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Stan Griffiths

Tektronix didn't lose their way, they lost their market, and the old guard couldn't figure out how to cope.

Reagan spent the Soviet Union into bankruptcy, and then shifted gears into reducing the burden on the US taxpayers.

The cold war was over and there was no longer a need to keep the military at full readiness to fight another world war... so they downsized, and new R&D programs were severely reduced.

The reduction of the military R&D programs meant that the companies that supplied the equipment needs of the R&D programs were seriously starved of new sales.

The Military Industrial Complex's golden teat dried up, and with it went all of the luxurious ways of Tektronix, HP, and many others... even me.

Tektronix tried to address the commercial market, all the way down to the TV repairman, but the really sucked at making things cheaply, and the commercial market was very cost conscious.

-Chuck Harris



Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:
Stan may have been a friend of Tektronix but he didn't trust the Tektronix Corporation. As the co-founder of the vintageTEK Museum he was adamant there be no connection to the corporation at all. Stan wanted to be free to show the things they got wrong, the things they were embarrassed about, and even some things they wanted to suppress.
It is my guess that he was concerned about things the corporation
began to do in the late 1980s when they lost their way, began losing
money, saw their market share shrinking, and decided they could no
longer afford their reputation for excellence. If that was the reason
for mistrust then Stan was not alone. During this period Tek decisions
were based on the recommendations of outside management consultants
rather than their own staff of brilliant engineers. Many of Tek's most
talented employees saw this as a time of great upheaval and left when
they saw the handwriting on the wall

Dennis Tillman W7PF.




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: DC 503A part

Ed (SCSKITS)
 

Bill:

I took a closer look at the LED display that I had suggested and the actual board from my DC503A. The TEK LED display height off the board is about 0.090 more than the HDSP-7503 display and it is very likely that the digit height, width, and slant would also be a little different. If you can not find a replacement part, I am thinking about doing a board and tacking it on to my next order from China to add to my collection of TEK replacement parts. Should be about a month due to their new year holiday my being away mid Feb.

ed


Re: 454 HV regulation off

Albert Otten
 

Hi Jack, you didn't give up, did you?
Albert


Re: 5111 Storage Scope Loss of -30VDC

Mlynch001
 

Tim P,

I would like to learn the cause and resolution of that problem myself.

Perhaps Mr. Wilson could expand on the actual cause of the problem and his solution?

Thanks!

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR