Date   

Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Stephen Hanselman
 

Things that are little known.... the French and German government own a fair piece of Airbus. When Boeing and MD were taking about merging Airbus through the EU told Euro carriers they would be sanctioned if they bought Boeing AC if the merger went through.

Anyone who looks at the EU as anything but a Euro protectionist group needs to do more research.

Regards,

Stephen Hanselman
Datagate Systems, LLC

On Jan 26, 2020, at 23:09, Tam Hanna <tamhan@...> wrote:

Hello,

now, I will lean myself out of the window a bit and go OT. My ex-wife is a Mosaic, and was in Government in Austria at the time. So I know a bit, plus I am an aircraft buff.


What really did McDonnell in was the EU. SAS, Austrian Airlines, etc all were strong users of the DC9 and MD8x aircraft.

When the EU came in and the Airbus, governments were very motivated to push the countries national airlines to use these aircraft. In the case of Austria, the company really did not want the new A320 (pilots hated them, called them Atari Aeroplane initially) and wanted to stick with McDonnel. But at the time, most airlines were government owned - and who pays the piper decides which tune is to be farted out.


Tam

--
With best regards
Tam HANNA

Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/




Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Tam Hanna
 

Hello Brian,

I am on the side of the pond which has good food but limited freedom of speech and no guns.

;)


But: IMHO, what did McDonnell in was the airfoil. This incidentally also was the Soviet Union's problem, with OKB Ilyushin facing severe problems to get the air ministry to approve wing mounted engines on the IL-86.

As much as my exwife loved the MD-80 in government service (only one neighbor in Y in case you did not get your government worker OpUp to C), on the long run, it was clear that something else needed to be bought. Biplanes, after all, are fun too - but they are not suited to todays airline tasks.


What I complain about was the timing. In the beginning of 1990, when this decision was made, the Soviet Union had just collapsed and no one knew how Austria's economy would continue (and if it could continue at all). The MD-80 were fully paid for, the Airbii had to be financed. IMHO, at the then current fuel prices, saving the interest and the down payment would have been smarter.


Look at it this way: FJ, once Austria's Pride and Joy under Bruno Kreisky, went to the Western Germans in 2008 in a firesale, for one stinking Euro. Northwest, which kept the even older DC9, sold itself later, for a lot of money, to Delta.


Tam

--
With best regards
Tam HANNA

Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/


Re: Guernsey Island 2445

n4buq
 

According to the manuals I've reviewed, some of them state that serial numbers for equipment not built in Beaverton start with a letter (e.g. J for Japan, etc.), and other manuals show numeric prefixes (e.g. 1 for Guernsey, etc.). Confusing.

From what I can tell, the Beaverton 2445 scopes must have started with serial number B010100. The serial number for my 2445 is 106xxx. If I discount the leading 1 as the Guernsey indicator and compare the last five digits, it would seem to indicate a serial number that's smaller than the beginning serial number of the entire run at Beaverton. Confusing.

The only real reason I started this thread is I'm looking for one of the "bar" styled snap-on knob covers (like the one for the vertical adjustment knobs) and the part numbers for those are dependent on serial number ranges. I'm pretty sure mine is the earlier number (darker gray) but it started me wondering.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Charlie.c" <ctconger@...>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2020 7:21:27 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Guernsey Island 2445

To further thicken the plot I know that in the 80 s and later standard
numbering for all Beaverton made models began with B010100.
The first production unit made would carry that serial number. I was told
this was to confuse the competition so they would have difficulty tracking
how many units of a particular type had been made.
Not sure about the other countries. But al the Sony/TEK made stuff I ever saw
began with a J.




Re: TEK514 needs new 5V4G tube

Colin Herbert
 

You could try lashing up a solid-state substitute with a couple of diodes and a series voltage dropper resistor having an appropriate wattage. It may be a "lash-up", but it would probably serve to prove the point and keep the scope working until a proper replacement can be found.

"Ask Jan First" has some at 27 Euro plus shipping:

http://www.fragjanzuerst.de/eindex.htm

Also Langrex in the UK have some Russian-made ones at £14.50:

https://www.langrex.co.uk/?s=5V4G&post_type=product

Good Luck, Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Hendrix
Sent: 26 January 2020 23:10
To: TekScopes@groups.io; TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] TEK514 needs new 5V4G tube

Okay, it's a "valve" for our limey friends!

Today I was able to do some more troubleshooting with my dad and my sons, on Dad's TEK514. I took along my thermal camera to help track down the short that was blowing the inlet fuse. Turned out i didn't need it, but it helped confirm. One rectifier tube right next to that monster power transformer started getting extra hot within seconds of power-on, and then started arcing and making a nice arc lamp. I've done a bit of searching and it seems the audiophiles like these tubes; the best I could find was AU$55 for a pair on eBay. Dunno how much shipping would be from down under. Fairly simple fix, to swap out a tube - if that's the only problem. But we checked all the electrolytic caps with an ohmmeter and none seemed to be shorted nor open. Looking for any thoughts on a good source for the tube, and/or whether it's a worthwhile fix.

Steve Hendrix


Re: Guernsey Island 2445

 

On Mon, Jan 27, 2020 at 02:21 PM, Charlie.c wrote:


But al the Sony/TEK made stuff I ever saw began with a J.
I have a number of Sony Tektronix devices in the lab and 2 at home. Those at home (where I am at the moment) both carry serial numbers starting with 3.

Raymond


Re: Tek CRTs supplied to competing manufacturers

Colin Herbert
 

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Greg Muir via Groups.Io
Sent: 26 January 2020 22:56
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek CRTs supplied to competing manufacturers

George,

Do you or anyone else have a copy handy of "Winning with People; The first 40 years of Tektronix" to confirm this? I can’t seem to find my copy at the moment.

Thanks,

Greg

On 01-26-2018 at 12:55 pm George Gonzales wrote:
“I think it was the other way around. Tek used to buy CRTs from Dumont and RCA but found out they were getting below average CRTs….”


Re: 2465B - Weak Readout Intensity

flanneltuba@...
 

I would like to someday post my summarized adventures with this dim intensity 2465B on the now legendary EEVBlog thread/tome of 2465B trials and battles won and lost. As you point out this particular condition is not anything previously documented in that thread.

I have ordered a replacement CRT (from Israel) but I'm still not completely convinced that the CRT is at fault, though I have to admit, I am running out of other scapegoats.

Even though I have previously probed for valid signals and voltages on the HV supply, this afternoon, I went ahead and pulled the whole HV board out and have been, one-by-one pulling legs or removing entirely and checking each of the individual passive components, in order of progression through the VZ-(axis) signal path. So far every resistor, capacitor and diode in the main path tests, not just good, but spot-on good. There are a few left to check in the DC restorer and the Grid Bias branches. I did formerly check the grid bias transistor (Q1980) and checked out good on my Huntron impedance tracer. If I don't find any bad components in this part of the circuit, my next plan is to put a volt meter across R1994 and watch the voltage as I adjust the Grid Bias pot. Q1980 still could be failing in circuit.

I also still have on my list to check the sample-and-hold op amps on the DIR and RDIR mux lines, as mentioned previously. They are responsible for supplying the intensity levels to U650, the Display Sequencer, (which pretty much is the ring leader in terms of deciding what goes out to the CRT, and sending that all through U950, the Z-Axis amplifier. I'm only at this point realizing, having manically traced my way through the schematic like a drooling lunatic, that all this is spelled out quite nicely in the Theory of Operation section in the manual on page 3a-18. Oh well, the whole point of this project was to learn how this top-dog of the analog scope world works. (Actually the point was to get a cheap broken one and fix it with just a PSU re-cap, but c'mon, everyone here knows, the fun is in the journey, not the destination! Eh, right? ;) )

I'll be sure to post updates on my progress.

- Scott


Re: TEK514 needs new 5V4G tube

Chuck Harris
 

When presented with a dead short, a 5V4 will make
quite a light show as it strips the coating off its
cathode. An already gassy 5V4 will make a similar
light show. Rarified air not being as good of an
insulator as a hard vacuum.

Capacitors that are old enough to have a 5V4 are usually
old enough to have corrosive electrolyte that will slowly
eat the oxide dielectric layer from the aluminum foil
plates. A 514 is definitely old enough to have this
problem. Most, if not all, twist lock electrolytics are
old enough to have this problem.

The safe answer is to rebuild the oxide layer (reform) the
capacitors before applying full voltage to the capacitors.

Some like to do this by using a variac, but although it
is better than brute force turning the juice on, it isn't
optimal. The problem with using a variac is the voltage
is lower (good), but the power available to heat the
capacitor is just as high as always. And, a most tek tube
scopes have thermal relays that turn on the HV, which wont
reliably switch at lower than full voltage.

Optimal is to reform the same way the factory did in the
first place, which is to apply full voltage through a
1-10K power resistor for 1 hour.

-Chuck Harris

Steve Hendrix wrote:

At 2020-01-27 12:07 AM, Chuck Harris wrote:


Electrolytic caps get into a condition where they
become lower voltage versions of themselves.

An ohmmeter tests at 1.5V in most cases, and 9V in
VOM's.  Using one to test a 400V capacitor is less
than worthless.
I was wondering about that, because I rarely use electrolytics anywhere above about 24V in my work. But would a shorted cap cause the rectifier tube ahead of it to arc over? I suppose it's possible that extra heat generated in the tube could soften or melt some of the internal structures, causing spacing to shrink as something bends. In that case, it seems to me that the tube is now bad, but the root cause of a shorted cap still needs to be fixed. Would you suggest replacing all the big electrolytics first? Since Tek seemed to like stocking only 20uF caps (which were called 20mF in those days), they used as many as 6 in parallel in some places. The physical connection methods used are beautiful artwork, but makes it a bit tricky mechanically to replace the caps as they're used as standoffs to hold everything else.

Steve Hendrix




Re: Guernsey Island 2445

Charlie Conger
 

To further thicken the plot I know that in the 80 s and later standard numbering for all Beaverton made models began with B010100.
The first production unit made would carry that serial number. I was told this was to confuse the competition so they would have difficulty tracking how many units of a particular type had been made.
Not sure about the other countries. But al the Sony/TEK made stuff I ever saw began with a J.


Re: Your generosity is STUNNING!

Michael A. Terrell
 

We were incorporated as a non profit, and had an annual election of
officers. It was all done by volunteers, so no one was paid for the few
hours a year it took to elect officers and file with the IRS. I don't
think there is any limitation of board members all being in the US. It has
been 30 years since I was president of that club.

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 6:54 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Michael,
A bank account is definitely something we have to do. It is a little
tricky because Michael is in Canada and I am in the US so we have to be
sure we comply with the laws of both nations.

We also need to put it in an account where currency variations won't
adversely affect it. That would probably be the US.

In April 2011 it cost $0.95CD to buy $1.00US. The Canadian dollar was
worth more than the US dollar.
Today it costs $1.32CD to buy $1.00US. A Canadian dollar is worth $0.76US.

Since Groups,io is in the US it might be easier to have the bank account
in the US.

I am hopeful Groups.io will implement a payment option that would let us
pay 5 years at a time. That would be even better.
Michael Dunn says I shouldn't hold my breath.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Michael A. Terrell
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:20 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Your generosity is STUNNING!

Why not set up a bank account for it, and Autopay for Groups.io? It could
also be used to fund group purchases for custom made replacement parts,
when you are short a person or two. Put the money back into the account
when the extras are sold. We did this for a computer club, in the '80s. It
was registered as a non profit, but it wouldn't be difficult to do that for
a group this size.

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 12:46 AM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Raymond,

You are one of the few people who did correctly identify your
contribution in my list.
This is the information I have on your contribution:
### DENNIS' LOCAL TIME $$$ STATUS CONTRIBUTOR
PAYPAL TRANSACTION
128 Wed 1/1/2020 2:50 PM $22.57 TO BE RETURNED Raymond Domp
Frank 9SK435895B100851N

Yes, Siggi is correct PayPal did this for everyone. They also obscure
the time you made your contribution because they strip out your UTC
offset (time zone) so I can’t tell the hour of the day you sent it.
The minutes are close however.

Thank you for your contribution. We received too much money to keep it
all so we will be refunding anything above $10.00 as soon as I have
had a chance to contact everyone who asked for confirmation that I
received their contribution.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Raymond Domp Frank
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2020 9:45 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Your generosity is STUNNING!

Dennis,
My transaction could well be
9SK43*******0851N $22.57 TO BE REFUNDED
That's the only transaction in your list for the amount that I
transferred.
Siggi may be right in assuming that Paypal references change between
sender and receiver (nice!) for international transactions.

Raymond








--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator




Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Michael A. Terrell
 

The last product that I helped Microdyne bring to the market had 48 size
'D' pages of schematics. It had over 150 various firmware packages to
configure it to the customer's needs. You needed about 45 pieces of test
equipment to test it at various stages and for final test. How would you
release service data for that? How wuld any released data track new
firmware, and what it was compatible with? The product was the RCB2000, a
dual channel, digital Telemetry receiver that could be dropped in to
replace an existing all analog system of two receivers and a long loop
combiner for the video output. It was built completely on custom VXI
boards, in 7" of rack space. It required special training for the
production and test techs, yet some people thought that they could repair
it with the same test equipment hey had used for over 20 years on the much
simpler Analog designs. There are two sides to the issue.

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 6:33 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Message #163848
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 9:20 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 11801 questions - funny fan noise and light

Ragnar asks: Are there any schematics on these [11801] boxes to be found?

By the 1960s Tek's Service Manuals (SM) were the finest in the industry.
They were a major selling point for Tek products. They were specifically
designed to give you all the information necessary to fix the instrument.
With the SM it was relatively inexpensive to maintain Tek instruments in
calibrated condition for a long time after they were purchased. The longer
those instruments could be maintained in good condition the lower the Total
Cost of Ownership (TCO) for the company that owned it. Eventually someone
would realize that the SMs were adversely affecting sales. With such good
SMs no one was in a hurry to buy new instruments from Tek when it was easy
to keep their old instruments calibrated and working perfectly.

In the mid-1980s someone in management did realize that Tek could make more
money by NOT including schematics in their service manuals. By the time the
11000 series of scopes appeared in 1986 schematics were banned from the
Service Manuals for new products. As far as I know there are no schematics
available anywhere for the 11K scopes. I tried on one occasion to get the
set for an 11K scope from someone at Tek but they were unable to locate
them. Since then Tek has tightly controlled the schematics for all of the
11K scopes and probably all other products as well. If a schematic set were
ever to escape from Tek's "clutches" and be released "into the wild" for a
supported product then returning it to the factory for repair would not be
the only way to get it fixed.

The disappearance of the schematics from Tek's service manuals was
impossible to miss when it happened. It occurred during a period in the
latter half of the 1980s when Tek was struggling financially with layoffs,
spin-offs, and decreased earnings almost every quarter.

When a product support department is a Cost Center the company recognizes
that good support is an intrinsic cost of producing a good product. The
company can charge more for its products because of the superior support
provided for them. The cost associated with providing this support is
recouped indirectly by a higher price the customer will pay for a
well-supported product.

When a product support department is a Profit Center it is expected to
generate revenue for a company by charging for support. This change will
help a struggling company's bottom line for a few years - which was
probably
why Tek chose to do it in 1986 - but eventually it will result in a loss of
customers and greater competition. In other words, this will come back to
bite you one day. Presumably the manager who is credited for this great
idea
will also know he has a few years to find a job elsewhere before the real
damage he has done becomes apparent to the board.

Why did Tek remove the schematics?
* Without schematics Tek products have to be returned to the factory or
nearest repair center for repair. This is inconvenient for the customer
because travel time back and forth can be greater than the repair time. It
is dangerous because the instrument can be damaged in transit. It is
expensive to crate up and ship a large, heavy instrument. In addition,
since
the factory has a monopoly on repairs, they can charge more than the
customer's in-house repair department costs. This increases the customers
TCO. Tek makes money but it is at the expense of the customer who
eventually
will realize that Tek products are becoming as expensive to own as other
similar products from HP, LeCroy, etc..
* More importantly, without schematics, Tek can arbitrarily shorten the
useful lifetime of their products by declaring a product obsolete and
ending
the repair service for it each time they introduce a new product that
improves on the old one. By no longer providing repair service for obsolete
products customers can be pressured to purchase the new replacement the
next
time their existing instrument breaks. Tek makes more money by selling new
products to replace the old ones they will no longer repair. The customer's
TCO goes up a lot in this scenario.

Each time the TCO goes up for the customer it encourages him to look at
competitive products and even low cost products from places like China
which
do not have the engineering excellence Tek is (was?) famous for. By making
support a Profit Center Tek makes more money in the short term but loses
customers in the long term when they purchase competitive products with a
lower TCO. In the very long term Tek loses the low end segment of the
market
to new competitors who see an opportunity to enter it with 1) products that
are cheaper than Tek can make, and 2) products the customer can justify
buying because they understand it was meant to be recycled rather than
repaired when it eventually breaks. The TCO is irrelevant for throw away
products.

In the very long term, supporting customers with a Profit Center model,
will
drive customers to reputable competitors with similar products that offer
them a choice of in-house support vs. Tek Profit Center support. Some
customers will realize they have another choice - buy an inexpensive
throw-away instrument for 1/4 to 1/3 of the price Tek charges. This creates
more competition at the low end of the marketplace where the profit margin
has eroded so deeply that Tek is no longer competitive.

Dennis Tillman W7PF







Re: TEK514 needs new 5V4G tube

Steve Hendrix
 

At 2020-01-27 12:07 AM, Chuck Harris wrote:


Electrolytic caps get into a condition where they
become lower voltage versions of themselves.

An ohmmeter tests at 1.5V in most cases, and 9V in
VOM's.  Using one to test a 400V capacitor is less
than worthless.
I was wondering about that, because I rarely use electrolytics anywhere above about 24V in my work. But would a shorted cap cause the rectifier tube ahead of it to arc over? I suppose it's possible that extra heat generated in the tube could soften or melt some of the internal structures, causing spacing to shrink as something bends. In that case, it seems to me that the tube is now bad, but the root cause of a shorted cap still needs to be fixed. Would you suggest replacing all the big electrolytics first? Since Tek seemed to like stocking only 20uF caps (which were called 20mF in those days), they used as many as 6 in parallel in some places. The physical connection methods used are beautiful artwork, but makes it a bit tricky mechanically to replace the caps as they're used as standoffs to hold everything else.

Steve Hendrix


Re: TEK514 needs new 5V4G tube

Steve Hendrix
 

At 2020-01-26 09:01 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:


Is there any reason you can't buy a 5V4G? There are 123 of them on eBay at
the moment. Prices start at $12 for them and go up.
I can test it for you to confirm its good if want to send it to me.
Odd, I already looked. Out of the first hundred or so hits, I found only two, and both were way more expensive than that. I'll have another look, and try some different search terms so i don't get 4WD nuts etc. Thanks for the pointer.

Steve Hendrix


Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Leo Bodnar
 

I am sure that 11800 series was COCOM / export controlled product and so was its technical documentation.

Maybe still is... When things get onto export control list they tend to stay there for a very long time: pulse generators with 500ps (or shorter) risetime and amplitude of 6V or more are still considered a strategic export and dual use technology and need export licence.
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/856510/UK_strategic_export_control_lists_20191231.pdf

Leo


Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

G Hopper
 

Quite possibly my best typo ever :-)

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 10:01 PM Carsten Bormann <cabocabo@...> wrote:

On 2020-01-27, at 05:24, G Hopper <kb7wsd@...> wrote:

I think if you were to tell this story to a Boeing engineer, he might
call
it the McDonald Douglas disease.
This.

(Although they probably will call it McDonnell Douglas disease.
Somehow, McDonald’s does figure in, though :-)

Grüße, Carsten





Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Brian Cockburn
 

Tam,

I'm sure that the US government put subtle or un-subtle pressure on US carriers to buy US made aircraft, just as happened in the EU. It is natural. And as a European it always delights me when the EU does similar things to the US and the US whines about it. (Not that I'm saying that you are whining.)

Cheers, Brian.


Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Tam Hanna
 

Hello,

now, I will lean myself out of the window a bit and go OT. My ex-wife is a Mosaic, and was in Government in Austria at the time. So I know a bit, plus I am an aircraft buff.


What really did McDonnell in was the EU. SAS, Austrian Airlines, etc all were strong users of the DC9 and MD8x aircraft.

When the EU came in and the Airbus, governments were very motivated to push the countries national airlines to use these aircraft. In the case of Austria, the company really did not want the new A320 (pilots hated them, called them Atari Aeroplane initially) and wanted to stick with McDonnel. But at the time, most airlines were government owned - and who pays the piper decides which tune is to be farted out.


Tam

--
With best regards
Tam HANNA

Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/


Re: Where have all the Schematics Gone?

Carsten Bormann
 

On 2020-01-27, at 05:24, G Hopper <kb7wsd@...> wrote:

I think if you were to tell this story to a Boeing engineer, he might call
it the McDonald Douglas disease.
This.

(Although they probably will call it McDonnell Douglas disease.
Somehow, McDonald’s does figure in, though :-)

Grüße, Carsten


Re: 2430a carrying handle and face cover

Terry Gains
 

Thanks Craig, Will do.

On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 at 17:08, Craig Cramb <@Manfromtrane>
wrote:

I also need to buy a 2430a carrying handle and face cover.

I have lots of the 2430/2430A scope parts. contact me offline if
interested.
electronixtoolbox at gmail dot com

Craig
On Jan 26, 2020, at 8:04 PM, Terry Gains <terry.waihi@...> wrote:

I also need to buy a 2430a carrying handle and face cover.


--
Kind regards,
Terry


Re: TEK514 needs new 5V4G tube

Chuck Harris
 

Electrolytic caps get into a condition where they
become lower voltage versions of themselves.

An ohmmeter tests at 1.5V in most cases, and 9V in
VOM's. Using one to test a 400V capacitor is less
than worthless.

-Chuck Harris

Steve Hendrix wrote:

Okay, it's a "valve" for our limey friends!

Today I was able to do some more troubleshooting with my dad and my sons, on Dad's TEK514. I took along my thermal camera to help track down the short that was blowing the inlet fuse. Turned out i didn't need it, but it helped confirm. One rectifier tube right next to that monster power transformer started getting extra hot within seconds of power-on, and then started arcing and making a nice arc lamp. I've done a bit of searching and it seems the audiophiles like these tubes; the best I could find was AU$55 for a pair on eBay. Dunno how much shipping would be from down under. Fairly simple fix, to swap out a tube - if that's the only problem. But we checked all the electrolytic caps with an ohmmeter and none seemed to be shorted nor open. Looking for any thoughts on a good source for the tube, and/or whether it's a worthwhile fix.

Steve Hendrix