Date   

Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

ken chalfant
 

Greetings,

Over the years I have had reasonable luck with WD-40.

It involves some patient waiting. My process is to apply the WD-40, go have a cup of coffee and then come back and see how it is doing. Once most of the adhesive as been softened by the WD-40 I follow-up with alcohol.

Of course, I would try this on an inconspicuous area.

Hopefully this suggestion will prove helpful.

Regards,

Ken

On 12Dec, 2020, at 3:30 AM, Jean-Paul <jonpaul@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Bonjour,

I Am Restoring 1960-1970s Tek equipment with blue aluminum cabinet covers, stored for decades with wide tape, which left yellow adhesive over wide areas.

So, isopropyl alcohol 70%...does not remove the adhesive well. It spreads it around and needs a lot of force.
And petroleum distilates like "Goo Gone" work but affect the blue finish.

What are the best solvents to remove old dried adhesive without damaging the blue finish?

Many thanks

Jon








Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Vince Vielhaber
 

If you can find it, this stuff from the folks that make Duck tape works quite well. I haven't had it harm anything yet and I've even used it to remove stickers from DVDs.

http://www.hamradio.fun/pix/adhesiveremover.jpg

Vince.

On 12/12/2020 05:37 AM, Ken, WA2LBI wrote:
Jon,

I've used WD-40 for removing tape residue and goo left from "melting"
plastic feet. Try it on an inconspicuous area (cabinet bottom) first. I
can't recall it damaging any equipment but I do check each item before
working on a visible area.

Ken
WA2LBI





On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 5:31 AM Jean-Paul <jonpaul@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Bonjour,

I Am Restoring 1960-1970s Tek equipment with blue aluminum cabinet
covers, stored for decades with wide tape, which left yellow adhesive over
wide areas.

So, isopropyl alcohol 70%...does not remove the adhesive well. It spreads
it around and needs a lot of force.
And petroleum distilates like "Goo Gone" work but affect the blue finish.

What are the best solvents to remove old dried adhesive without damaging
the blue finish?

Many thanks

Jon





Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Colin Herbert
 

Frédéric,
Limonene is a constituent of citrus oil, but I guess you weren't aware of that.
As a research chemist for most of my working life, I do get rather frustrated when people always assume that chemicals are always "nasty" and "dangerous". True, there are dangerous chemicals (such as TNT), but there are also ones which are beneficial, such as penicillin (it is manufactured, not just made by mould), paracetamol, ethanol (try any alcoholic drink), petroleum (your internal-combustion engine car wouldn't go far without it). I won't go on further for fear of boring everyone.
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of momemeca
Sent: 12 December 2020 12:16
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Salut Jean-Paul,
I also restore and collect older generation TEK equipment as well as other makes measuring instruments and I use "Citrus Oil" based label remover in a spray on bottle.
Just apply enough, initially, to wet the label and let it soak for a period of time until you can push the edge of the label with your fingernail.
At this point I peel the upper layer of the label and apply another small amount to soak the next layer.
Eventually the old adhesive will be dissolved without this "limonene" based solvent ever damaging the paintwork.
One big warning however: Citrus-based solvents, when exposed to some plastics, will cause softening of those plastics. Therefore, wipe any overspray immediately with clean water and wipe dry. I usually mask off any plastic bits if they are too close.
Finish off your label removal by cleaning area with "Spray n' Wipe" or something similar.

A la prochaine,

Frédéric :-)


On 12 Dec 2020, at 21:30, Jean-Paul <jonpaul@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Bonjour,

I Am Restoring 1960-1970s Tek equipment with blue aluminum cabinet covers, stored for decades with wide tape, which left yellow adhesive over wide areas.

So, isopropyl alcohol 70%...does not remove the adhesive well. It spreads it around and needs a lot of force.
And petroleum distilates like "Goo Gone" work but affect the blue finish.

What are the best solvents to remove old dried adhesive without damaging the blue finish?

Many thanks

Jon








Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

I used to buy 99% IPA at the local Safeway all the time.

And, yes, it is hygroscopic. If it isn't tightly covered,
it will turn into 91%.

Since COVID, I can't get anything stronger than 70%.

-Chuck Harris

Dale H. Cook wrote:


On 12/12/2020 7:22 AM, Roger Evans wrote:



During the discussion of protection against the Covid19 virus it emerged that 90+
percent alcohol is a more effective solvent than lower concentrations.  I use 99% IPA

The reason why you don't see isopropyl alcohol stronger than 91% in stores is that at
higher purities isopropyl is hygroscopic. 99% isopropyl must be kept tightly capped.
Otherwise it will absorb moisture from the atmosphere until it reaches 91%, where it
is stable.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

Turpentine doesn't seem to be readily available anymore.

What you can buy seems to be a refined version of kerosene
with something to make it smell like turps.

It sure doesn't work like turps, though.

-Chuck Harris

Stephen wrote:

I’ve been using turpentine for years on virtually any type of surface, and it works great. It’s non-aggressive, and naturally present in trees. It’s what cobblers have been using to remove or soften the glue.






Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Stephen
 

On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 03:07 AM, SCMenasian wrote:


Real turpentine is a natural plant oil derived from pine tree gum while
mineral spirits refers to a low molecular weight petroleum distillate. Both
are/were used to thin certain kinds of paint, etc. and either will often
suffice for that purpose. The situation has become confused, however, because
the names are often used interchangibly with mineral spirits being called
"turpentine" and/or "paint thinner" or "oderless thinner". The last time I
checked real turpentine was more expensive than mineral spirits; but that was
a long time ago.

Stephen
The turpentine I use is very significantly more expensive than mineral chemicals. But it lasts a very long time too. A 1-liter bottle lasts me a good few years. It’s also far from odorless. You can smell it from light years away.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

SCMenasian
 

Real turpentine is a natural plant oil derived from pine tree gum while mineral spirits refers to a low molecular weight petroleum distillate. Both are/were used to thin certain kinds of paint, etc. and either will often suffice for that purpose. The situation has become confused, however, because the names are often used interchangibly with mineral spirits being called "turpentine" and/or "paint thinner" or "oderless thinner". The last time I checked real turpentine was more expensive than mineral spirits; but that was a long time ago.

Stephen


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

David Slipper
 

Be very careful!  Try any solvent on an "unseen" area first.

I had a bit of a disaster cleaning one tek scope panel with Isopropyl Alcohol :-(

I have found that a tiny amount of "Baby Shampoo" in warm water is best safest, but even then I try it first where it wont notice.

Dave

On 12/12/2020 13:47, John Ferguson via groups.io wrote:
Are mineral spirits different from turpentine?  I ask because mineral
spirits remove a particularly tenacious variety of 3M adhesive,
something nothing else would touch.
Good idea too. I also think that not using manufactured chemicals is best. Hence my use of turpentine. it works very fast after you let it sit for a while - from a few minutes, to an hour depending on the nature of what you have to remove. Non-aggressive, and also removes dirt in the process.



.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Stephen
 

On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 02:47 AM, John Ferguson wrote:


Are mineral spirits different from turpentine?  I ask because mineral
spirits remove a particularly tenacious variety of 3M adhesive,
something nothing else would touch.
Good idea too. I also think that not using manufactured chemicals is best.
Hence my use of turpentine. it works very fast after you let it sit for a
while - from a few minutes, to an hour depending on the nature of what you
have to remove. Non-aggressive, and also removes dirt in the process.
I wouldn’t know, I’m not a chemist. But alI can say is that turpentine has worked flawlessly on any adhesive I used it on so far. Some had even hardened a lot after being on for decades... And I also like the fact that it is natural.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

John Ferguson
 

Are mineral spirits different from turpentine?  I ask because mineral spirits remove a particularly tenacious variety of 3M adhesive, something nothing else would touch.

Good idea too. I also think that not using manufactured chemicals is best. Hence my use of turpentine. it works very fast after you let it sit for a while - from a few minutes, to an hour depending on the nature of what you have to remove. Non-aggressive, and also removes dirt in the process.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Stephen
 

On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 02:20 AM, Sandra Carroll wrote:


FWIW,
While doing this requires allot of elbow grease it uses no solvents or
anything.
I use a rubber pencil eraser (not synthetic) to remove all residue and clean
up a enclosure. It was trick I picked up over on eevblog in a post about
equipment restoration and I'm
Surprised at how well it works. It also takes care of general dirt and grim.
I wish I could remember the post and who it was so I could credit them.

Use a larger stand-alone eraser for larger areas and an actual pencil end for
details

Sandra
Good idea too. I also think that not using manufactured chemicals is best. Hence my use of turpentine. it works very fast after you let it sit for a while - from a few minutes, to an hour depending on the nature of what you have to remove. Non-aggressive, and also removes dirt in the process.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Sandra Carroll
 

FWIW,
While doing this requires allot of elbow grease it uses no solvents or anything.
I use a rubber pencil eraser (not synthetic) to remove all residue and clean up a enclosure. It was trick I picked up over on eevblog in a post about equipment restoration and I'm
Surprised at how well it works. It also takes care of general dirt and grim. I wish I could remember the post and who it was so I could credit them.

Use a larger stand-alone eraser for larger areas and an actual pencil end for details

Sandra

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of greenboxmaven via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2020 8:06 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

I have used WD-40, applied and allowed to stand for hours or days, to soften tape and label adhesive. I have never seen it discolor the paint, but the adhesive may leave discoleration. When the residue is on the aluminum front panels, I use the sharp edge of a piece of fibrerglass circuit board to help get it off once the solvent has done it's work. Be gentle, avoid lettering, and the crud will come off with little or no trace and not scratch the panel.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 12/12/20 5:30, Jean-Paul wrote:
Bonjour,

I Am Restoring 1960-1970s Tek equipment with blue aluminum cabinet covers, stored for decades with wide tape, which left yellow adhesive over wide areas.

So, isopropyl alcohol 70%...does not remove the adhesive well. It spreads it around and needs a lot of force.
And petroleum distilates like "Goo Gone" work but affect the blue finish.

What are the best solvents to remove old dried adhesive without damaging the blue finish?

Many thanks

Jon









Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

W1RS
 

Cold Pressed Orange Oil - (D-Limonene)
Great Mulit-Use Cleaner: Glass Cleaner, Air Freshener, Adhesive Removal, Oil Spot Cleaner, Counter Top and Hard Surface Cleaner, Floor Cleaner, and Grill Cleaner
Derived from Citrus peel of oranges.
This stuff is great for removing labels. It is also non-toxic.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

greenboxmaven
 

I have used WD-40, applied and allowed to stand for hours or days, to soften tape and label adhesive. I have never seen it discolor the paint, but the adhesive may leave discoleration. When the residue is on the aluminum front panels, I use the sharp edge of a piece of fibrerglass circuit board to help get it off once the solvent has done it's work. Be gentle, avoid lettering, and the crud will come off with little or no trace and not scratch the panel.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 12/12/20 5:30, Jean-Paul wrote:
Bonjour,

I Am Restoring 1960-1970s Tek equipment with blue aluminum cabinet covers, stored for decades with wide tape, which left yellow adhesive over wide areas.

So, isopropyl alcohol 70%...does not remove the adhesive well. It spreads it around and needs a lot of force.
And petroleum distilates like "Goo Gone" work but affect the blue finish.

What are the best solvents to remove old dried adhesive without damaging the blue finish?

Many thanks

Jon








Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Keith
 

And just a note to remind folks to NOT use alcohol cleaners on any lacquer-painted items. Alcohol dissolves lacquer finishes, and 99% pure is pretty efficient at it. It was not unusual to see lacquer used as the paint of choice for indicator marks and labels on faceplates for some brands of test gear back in the day.

Alcohol is a part of lacquer thinners for this reason. It is considered a “slow” thinner, and is sometimes added as a retarder when painting when the temperature is high.

IME, turpentine is a good option for goo, as are the citrus cleaners several folks mentioned. Both require patience and ample soaking. A soft toothbrush can be helpful too.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

lucatz70@...
 

Goo Gone Goo & Adhesive Remover, 2 oz Original https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B009M14C4S/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_fabc_dlC_Z4l1Fb3FYTT33?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Wonderful for exactly this. Safe too
Luca


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Dale H. Cook
 

On 12/12/2020 7:22 AM, Roger Evans wrote:



During the discussion of protection against the Covid19 virus it
emerged that 90+
percent alcohol is a more effective solvent than lower
concentrations. I use 99% IPA


The reason why you don't see isopropyl alcohol stronger than 91% in stores is that at higher purities isopropyl is hygroscopic. 99% isopropyl must be kept tightly capped. Otherwise it will absorb moisture from the atmosphere until it reaches 91%, where it is stable.
--
Dale H. Cook, GR/HP/Tek Collector, Roanoke/Lynchburg, VA
https://plymouthcolony.net/starcity/radios/


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Stephen
 

I’ve been using turpentine for years on virtually any type of surface, and it works great. It’s non-aggressive, and naturally present in trees. It’s what cobblers have been using to remove or soften the glue.


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

Roger Evans
 

During the discussion of protection against the Covid19 virus it emerged that 90+ percent alcohol is a more effective solvent than lower concentrations. I use 99% IPA so I have never had the chance to observe any differences. What I have found is that glue residue that doesn't respond to IPA often will soften and come off with White Spirit. I haven't noticed any degradation of the paint but as usual you should take care.

Regards,

Roger


Re: Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

momemeca
 

Salut Jean-Paul,
I also restore and collect older generation TEK equipment as well as other makes measuring instruments and I use "Citrus Oil" based label remover in a spray on bottle.
Just apply enough, initially, to wet the label and let it soak for a period of time until you can push the edge of the label with your fingernail.
At this point I peel the upper layer of the label and apply another small amount to soak the next layer.
Eventually the old adhesive will be dissolved without this "limonene" based solvent ever damaging the paintwork.
One big warning however: Citrus-based solvents, when exposed to some plastics, will cause softening of those plastics. Therefore, wipe any overspray immediately with clean water and wipe dry. I usually mask off any plastic bits if they are too close.
Finish off your label removal by cleaning area with "Spray n' Wipe" or something similar.

A la prochaine,

Frédéric :-)

On 12 Dec 2020, at 21:30, Jean-Paul <jonpaul@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

Bonjour,

I Am Restoring 1960-1970s Tek equipment with blue aluminum cabinet covers, stored for decades with wide tape, which left yellow adhesive over wide areas.

So, isopropyl alcohol 70%...does not remove the adhesive well. It spreads it around and needs a lot of force.
And petroleum distilates like "Goo Gone" work but affect the blue finish.

What are the best solvents to remove old dried adhesive without damaging the blue finish?

Many thanks

Jon







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