Date   

Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Jean-Paul
 

Hello again now I recall the battery substitute in these VTVMs.

Heathkit V7a used a 12AX7 in the bridge and a dual diode 6AL5 for AC rectification.
the 7" meter movement had mirror scales, a Really fine hobbyists instrument for 20-25$ circa 1960.

http://www.w6ze.org/Heathkit/Heathkit_019_V7a.pdf

In 1970s HP made a solid state 410c series that had VTVM functions, have to check my archive for the manual and perhaps even the meter......

It will be interesting to find them and after decades in deep storage, to see are they still working? How bad (or good) is calibration ?

Jon


Tek 465M saga

Harrison
 

Been at this scope on and off for sometime. Learned a lot about Tek scopes and the 465M in particular. Initially, no trace, no +5V, no 95V. Currently have all three and the unit seems to function normally. Reading some of the circuitry wave forms, they appear close to what the manual depicts. Exercising the scope on a few pieces of gear also seems normal. Replaced CR582, Q742, C741, CR552, Q552 and VR552 and Vr553. Read out, in or out of circuit, all of the components related to the Q552, Q556, and F558 circuit. Also did the same with the Q544 and Q548 circuit as well as the VR533 area. All seemed well.
My problem: The above operational status and troubleshooting was done with one lead of CR552 lifted. When I make that connection F558 blows and transistor Q552 seems to go south. VR552, VR553, CR552 and Q552 appear to come into play when the HV regulator malfunctions. Purpose being to provide over-voltage protection.
Don't understand why unit performs like it does if HV regulator is bad and with CR552 lifted. In over my head on this one and not sure if the answer is right there in front of me or what.
Thanks for listening. Look forward to any comments.
Harrison N1FAM


Re: Tek blue (and gray) paint

Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 08:53 AM, Daveolla wrote:


... using a flatting agent in the paint mix. What would be good
to use when that cant be done and you need to dull a glossy spray down after
it is dried?
I don't see why... in theory... you can't use a matte finish ( or "ultra matte") lacquer.
Both oil and water based matte lacquers are available in the colonies.
It's theoretical... since we don't know what, or how, you're painting. (Tek panels?)


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

J. L. Trantham
 

I, too, love my VTVM's but, in defense of DMM's, the Fluke 8050A can measure Conductance down to .01 nS equivalent to resistance up to 100 Gigaohm.

Haven't had a need to measure that high (or low, depending on your point of view) so far though.

Joe

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Stephen
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:03 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] OT - VTVM’s are awesome

A while back I fell in love with these older piece of test gears. I love them and still use them to this day. Then yesterday I had to measure several high value resistors, from 30M up to 90M. None of my DMM, whether handheld or bench could read them. It’s then that I realized that 2 of my VTVM’s were able to read up to a whooping 5000M ohm!!! I was really impressed...


Re: Tek blue (and gray) paint

Dave Seiter
 

When I was a kid, I sprayed a Triumph Herald with lacquer out in the open; three sides went on great, but by the time I got to the rear section on the passenger side, the body was too hot (from the sun).  It took a lot of wet sanding to get rid of the resulting ripples!  I have yet to repaint a scope, but I think I might not use Tek blue if I did, especially if it was a modified instrument.  Heresy, I know!
-Dave

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 10:06:12 AM PST, Stephen Hanselman <kc4sw.io@kc4sw.com> wrote:

Car, I had a chance and blew it to get a truck load of '72 TR-120 and TR-6 parts.  Would have been pretty cool to have 72 TR6 Roadster andaTR6 motorcycle all painted the same colors. Ah well.

I did most of my work with a "detail" gun.  Same size nozzle but a much smaller reservoir. Lots of fun.

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miller
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 9:03 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

TR6 ?  Triumph? Car or Motorcycle?

Regards, Tom

On 12/9/2020 11:17 AM, Stephen Hanselman wrote:
Keith,

Thanks, well explained. I agree on the single stage, it’s not hard to shoot, this was my first large scale project a TR6.  I did discover that temperature was a big deal, don’t spray below 70degF.

Regards,
 
Stephen Hanselman
Datagate Systems, LLC
On Dec 9, 2020, at 05:38, Keith <coolblueglow@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishes”. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquer”. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.






--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Stephen
 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:59 AM, Joe Laffey wrote:


On Wed, 9 Dec 2020, Stephen wrote:

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:30 AM, Jean-Paul wrote:

None of mine bot one has batteries it them.
The ones I use the most have 7 tubes in them + a EA52 in the HF AC probe.
In my Eico with the 7-inch meter face I installed a little LM317 circuit
to the battery source. No worries about battery replacement/leakgae.

No change in accuracy or noise to be seen anywhere either.

--
73
Joe Laffey
This one has a 15cm diagonal meter.


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Stephen
 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:58 AM, Simon wrote:


I wanted to check leakage on a switch wafer that I had mistakenly tried to
clean with switch cleaner. The wafer was bakelite/phenolic and became slightly
conductive after cleaning. I could measure resistance between various contacts
using my VTVM (Ferisol A206), which showed about 2-3 GΩ. I was advised to
soak the wafer in a well-known oven cleaner in France (Briochin) diluted in
hot water. After a soak for an hour of so, rinsing well with last rinse in
deionized water, I dried it in a warm oven for a few hours and voilà could no
longer measure any leakage between the pins.
Simon
Good tip!! Thanks.
I have a Ferisol A204, but the galvanometer is dead.
The 2 VTVM’s I’m talking about are METRIX 745’s.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=257707


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Stephen
 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:59 AM, Joe Laffey wrote:


On Wed, 9 Dec 2020, Stephen wrote:

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:30 AM, Jean-Paul wrote:

None of mine bot one has batteries it them.
The ones I use the most have 7 tubes in them + a EA52 in the HF AC probe.
In my Eico with the 7-inch meter face I installed a little LM317 circuit
to the battery source. No worries about battery replacement/leakgae.

No change in accuracy or noise to be seen anywhere either.

--
73
Joe Laffey
It’s a good thing. I may do that on the one that does use a battery.


Re: FS: Tek P6102 probe [Actually P6012]

Dave Peterson
 

Exactly! Feed the addiction!

Now 'ya got me wanting: 20pF normalizer, CT-3 pickoff, GR cable. And I still need to get my basics! You guys are terrible! And this was supposed to be a low cost hobby! Grin.
Dave

On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 09:56:19 AM PST, Jim Ford <james.ford@cox.net> wrote:

Yeah, fed the addiction!  Gotta get my test equipment fix!Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Oz-in-DFW <lists@ozindfw.net> Date: 12/9/20  7:05 AM  (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] FS: Tek P6102 probe [Actually P6012] Happy to have, uh, helped?-- Oz (in DFW) N1OZ


Re: Tek blue (and gray) paint

Stephen Hanselman
 

Car, I had a chance and blew it to get a truck load of '72 TR-120 and TR-6 parts. Would have been pretty cool to have 72 TR6 Roadster andaTR6 motorcycle all painted the same colors. Ah well.

I did most of my work with a "detail" gun. Same size nozzle but a much smaller reservoir. Lots of fun.

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miller
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 9:03 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

TR6 ? Triumph? Car or Motorcycle?

Regards, Tom

On 12/9/2020 11:17 AM, Stephen Hanselman wrote:
Keith,

Thanks, well explained. I agree on the single stage, it’s not hard to shoot, this was my first large scale project a TR6. I did discover that temperature was a big deal, don’t spray below 70degF.

Regards,

Stephen Hanselman
Datagate Systems, LLC
On Dec 9, 2020, at 05:38, Keith <coolblueglow@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishes”. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquer”. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.






--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Joe Laffey
 

On Wed, 9 Dec 2020, Stephen wrote:

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:30 AM, Jean-Paul wrote:

None of mine bot one has batteries it them.
The ones I use the most have 7 tubes in them + a EA52 in the HF AC probe.
In my Eico with the 7-inch meter face I installed a little LM317 circuit to the battery source. No worries about battery replacement/leakgae.

No change in accuracy or noise to be seen anywhere either.

--
73
Joe Laffey


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Simon
 

I wanted to check leakage on a switch wafer that I had mistakenly tried to clean with switch cleaner. The wafer was bakelite/phenolic and became slightly conductive after cleaning. I could measure resistance between various contacts using my VTVM (Ferisol A206), which showed about 2-3 GΩ. I was advised to soak the wafer in a well-known oven cleaner in France (Briochin) diluted in hot water. After a soak for an hour of so, rinsing well with last rinse in deionized water, I dried it in a warm oven for a few hours and voilà could no longer measure any leakage between the pins.
Simon


Re: FS: Tek P6102 probe [Actually P6012]

Jim Ford
 

Yeah, fed the addiction!  Gotta get my test equipment fix!Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Oz-in-DFW <lists@ozindfw.net> Date: 12/9/20 7:05 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] FS: Tek P6102 probe [Actually P6012] Happy to have, uh, helped?-- Oz (in DFW) N1OZ


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Stephen
 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:30 AM, Jean-Paul wrote:


Dale had built the HeathKit V-7A in 1950s..1960s, still have it with the
manyual! Have to unearth and try out.

Had a 1.5V D cell for Ohms hope it did not corrode.....

Yes the GENRAD bridges are fine for megohm R, have the 1864 type megohmeters
but needs a lot of work....

Also acquired some 1000M and other R (not precision) from Victoreen in an
avionic HVPS project.....Memories

Big sign: DANGER 10,000 MEGOHMS"

Jon
None of mine bot one has batteries it them.
The ones I use the most have 7 tubes in them + a EA52 in the HF AC probe.


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Stephen
 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:24 AM, Dale H. Cook wrote:

In recent years I have sold almost all of my VTVMs while downsizing to
prepare for moving to a smaller house. I have solid state equipment that
does almost everything that those VTVMs did. My DER EE DE-5000 LCR meter
measures resistances up to 200 megOhms. For anything higher I still have
my General Radio Type 544-BS4 Megohm Bridge. It can resolve the
difference between 1,000,000 megOhms and an open circuit, has internal
150V and 500V supplies for measurement, and can be used with an external
supply up to 500V.
--
Dale H. Cook, GR/HP/Tek Collector, Roanoke/Lynchburg, VA
https://plymouthcolony.net/starcity/radios/
I have nothing against solid state stuff, I have tons of them. VOM’s and VTVM’s are just much cooler to me, and I like using them. But yes, they do take more space.


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Jean-Paul
 

Dale had built the HeathKit V-7A in 1950s..1960s, still have it with the manyual! Have to unearth and try out.

Had a 1.5V D cell for Ohms hope it did not corrode.....

Yes the GENRAD bridges are fine for megohm R, have the 1864 type megohmeters but needs a lot of work....

Also acquired some 1000M and other R (not precision) from Victoreen in an avionic HVPS project.....Memories

Big sign: DANGER 10,000 MEGOHMS"

Jon


Re: OT - VTVM’s are awesome

Dale H. Cook
 

On 12/9/2020 10:02 AM, Stephen wrote:



A while back I fell in love with these older piece of test gears. I
love them and still
use them to this day. Then yesterday I had to measure several high
value resistors,
from 30M up to 90M. None of my DMM, whether handheld or bench could read
them. It’s then that I realized that 2 of my VTVM’s were able to
read up to a
whooping 5000M ohm!!! I was really impressed.


In recent years I have sold almost all of my VTVMs while downsizing to prepare for moving to a smaller house. I have solid state equipment that does almost everything that those VTVMs did. My DER EE DE-5000 LCR meter measures resistances up to 200 megOhms. For anything higher I still have my General Radio Type 544-BS4 Megohm Bridge. It can resolve the difference between 1,000,000 megOhms and an open circuit, has internal 150V and 500V supplies for measurement, and can be used with an external supply up to 500V.
--
Dale H. Cook, GR/HP/Tek Collector, Roanoke/Lynchburg, VA
https://plymouthcolony.net/starcity/radios/


Re: Tek blue (and gray) paint

 

TR6 ?  Triumph? Car or Motorcycle?

Regards, Tom

On 12/9/2020 11:17 AM, Stephen Hanselman wrote:
Keith,

Thanks, well explained. I agree on the single stage, it’s not hard to shoot, this was my first large scale project a TR6. I did discover that temperature was a big deal, don’t spray below 70degF.

Regards,
Stephen Hanselman
Datagate Systems, LLC
On Dec 9, 2020, at 05:38, Keith <coolblueglow@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishes”. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquer”. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.





--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Tek blue (and gray) paint

Daveolla
 

Greetings, This subject comes up fairly often on this group and is usually just the same old same old, this time round we already have a few new posts with good points added to the mix!

I haven't used lacquer sprays much, usually due to it affecting what I would be spraying it on or over, but the last couple of years began using cans I have had in the paint cupboard more. However when I try to find it at Wallmart or Canadian Tire etc I find they dont carry it anymore. I figured it is an environmental issue. I guess Im coming to the party to late, or you snooze you lose kinnda thing.

Keith posted about using a flatting agent in the paint mix. What would be good to use when that cant be done and you need to dull a glossy spray down after it is dried?
I usually use xxxx (4 x's) fine steel wool or fine auto rubbing compounds and perhaps a paste-wax after that, though not ideal when you have crevices and such in the article. I have tried TSP trisodium phosphate as is often suggested (not from this group though) to put in the paint or used after it is dried but so far it has never worked to my liking.

If you know someone with the Tek spray (not a company) they could probably sneak it into the mail but the rattles cans should set of the bells an whisl......rattles and the post office. If it is a older can that doesn't rattle anymore unless shaken a lot you might succeed. Trying to muffle with padding or even a pillow aint gonna work., but adding a pile of marbles or nut and bolts or stones to box would certainly disguise the can rattle an not rat you out....I think.

Dave

postedAt 07:38 AM 12/09/2020, you wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishesâ€&#65533;. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquerâ€&#65533;. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.



Re: Greetings From a New Member

Paul Amaranth
 

I wonder how many people on this list had a connection to Physics
in some way?

I encountered my first Tek scope (a 464) when I worked at the Van de
Graaff accelerator lab at Wayne State Pysics dept. during my undergrad.

fun times

Paul

On Wed, Dec 09, 2020 at 10:40:22AM -0500, Chuck Harris wrote:
Oh lordy!

I remember a late night tour of the reactor at UoM in the
late 70's. Totally unsanctioned, but there I was getting a
tour from a friend during his late night baby sitting the
reactor to pay his tuition session. Love that blue glow!
[...]

--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows

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