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Re: recommended ESR meters these days

PAUL KOBY
 

I have an ESI (tegam) 252 and 253 which have been great meters. Picked them off the bay cheap.
Tegam bought ESI. I paid less than $100.00 for each. I had to manufacture a set of cables for one.
I just used some Kelvin leads from China and a junk box connector. The OEM test leads are still
available but over $250.00.
https://www.tegam.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/252_253_909-01_RevC.pdf

Pauk Kobyka5obi


Re: Viewing hoods for 7000 series

Mlynch001
 

Harvey,

These particular parts are designed using Metric dimensions. I basically measured the CRT Bezel directly with a metric caliper and adjusted from there. I do not use conversion factors unless there is no other way. I learned to work in either Metric or Imperial as needed. Since I work on old American cars and old Japanese motorcycles, this is a necessity. It helps when you work on a mid 80's GM car, which were mixed Imperial and Metric. CURA also allows Imperial measurements with an "add On" called "Barbarian Measurements". I forego this in favor of Metric, for simplicity sake. And yes, I have one of those calipers with that little button!

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


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Re: Quick Calibration Question.

Chuck Harris
 

I think I know what you are asking, but not completely sure.

The scopes are generally specified to be in calibration only
in the center region of the CRT. For instance, the 2465 family
says between the second, and 10th graticule line horizontally,
and the second and 6th graticule line vertically.

The reason for this is there is some serious work done to fight
the electron beams natural desire to see a spherical screen,
rather than a flat screen.

Also, there is often confusion about what part of the lit phosphor
is the part from which to measure.

The trace is an embodiment of a probability "bell curve". The
center is where most of the electrons hit the phosphor screen, and
towards the outside is where some noise deflected electrons hit.

It is best practice to consider the brightest, most central part
of the width of the beam to be the "trace"... So, when making a
peak-to-peak measurement, it will be from brightest to brightest...
not from furthest most visible fuzz to furthest most visible fuzz.

-Chuck Harris

Eric wrote:

As I have a backlog of plugins to calibrate, I have a questions I cant seem to find a good answer too. When calibrating a scope. Is the reference the center of the graticule line, the bottom edge, or the top edge. Common since tells me it should be the center of the graticule is the alignment point. But I am hoping to confirm. Or am I asking my analog scopes to be a little too accurate?




Re: Viewing hoods for 7000 series

Harvey White
 

Imperial vs metric is firstly a choice of the modeling tool. OpenSCAD loves metric, and you have to add the conversion factors for imperial.  I suspect that Cura (which I use) is metric, or could handle both.  Gcode could be either, but the 3D printers I have all have metric parts.  I suspect metric all the way through, and use metric for everything 3D.  Fortunately, electronic calipers have a metric/imperial button....

Harvey

On 3/12/2020 1:30 PM, Colin Herbert via Groups.Io wrote:
I have an 016-0154-00 7000-series viewing hood which is pretty comprehensive. It would be tricky to measure all of it, but I could measure the part that connects to the scope bezel, if it might be useful. I am guessing that it is probably originally in Imperial measure, but if metric is more adaptable to 3D printing, I can do that, too. Just let me know.

Colin.

Test print the first 5 or 10mm of the model. Just enough to make certain that the model "fits" your bezel before going "all in" on a full print. You may need to scale these up or down slightly to make a perfect fit. I have printed all of these and they work well. I am sure that someone will find changes that need to be made.Let me know how they turn out.

Glad to help out!


Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Reginald Beardsley
 

I have the Peak Atlas ESR70 and a BSIDE ESR02 Pro. Both give comparable results in my testing.

Atlas 233.4 uF 0.26 ohms
BSIDE 228.7 uF 0.31 ohms

I'd expect that my 4284A and 4285A would give slightly different numbers. But I really have no way of telling which is more accurate. I'd expect the HP kit, but I don't actually have a known standard so it would be purely brand reputation as nothing is in cal. I do know that they all agree well enough that for general repair bench use I'm comfortable using the BSIDE or Atlas.

The BSIDE also does general LCR and transistor tests, so for $20 it's worth having as a backup and field day kit use. In fact, for what it does and the price I think not having one is foolish.

Unlike the Peak Atlas, the BSIDE is stout enough to bludgeon someone to death without damage to the meter. It also has a table of typical ESR values for various values and voltage ratings on the back.


Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Jason A.
 

From the "For what it's worth" category, W2AEW has a nice video on how to run tests with an oscilloscope and details on construction of a test jig as well as a relaxation oscillator circuit in case you don't have a function generator.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74fz9iwZ_sM

Not generally as accurate as something like the DE-5000. I have one of those and really like it with the caveat it doesn't work that well for inductance/stray capacitance in transformers, but in fairness that's a bit outside the scope of what it was designed for. I also wish it had a better leakage test. I've thought of giving Mr. Carlson's Patreon some money to get the plans for this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhovRIM5xAo


Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Dave Daniel
 

Dave,

Thanks.

Th reason I asked is that I have an AADE that failed about eighteen months ago. I really liked it.

My "research" since then is pointing me to a Peak.But I still want to repair the AADE.

73,

DaveD

On 3/12/2020 8:47 PM, ArtekManuals wrote:
David

The one that died was a DE5000 ...8^(

Dave

On 3/12/2020 6:00 PM, David Holland wrote:
The DER DE-5000 appears to be still available:

https://www.amazon.com/5000-Handheld-LCR-Meter-accessories/dp/B00S298KJO

Mine isn't recent purchase (2017) but as far as I know, they're some of the
better LCR (and by proxy ESR) meters...

David


On Thu, Mar 12, 2020 at 5:57 PM ArtekManuals <manuals@...>
wrote:

Took out my (apparently not so) trusty ESR meter the other day and it
eyes had rolled back in its head and no amount of CPR would revive it..
Anyone bought one _*RECENTLY *_that they can recommend or warn me away
from?

Dave
manuals@...

--
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Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


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Re: recommended ESR meters these days

amirb
 

Dave
people have suggested a lot of capacitance/ESR meters but may I ask why dont you try to fix the DER DE-5000 that suddenly died?
it could be an easy fix really. DE-5000 is one of the best handheld tools and so far it is the best that has been suggested by people here (except the bench top ones)

On Thu, Mar 12, 2020 at 05:57 PM, ArtekManuals wrote:


Took out my (apparently not so) trusty ESR meter the other day and it
eyes had rolled back in its head and no amount of CPR would revive it..
Anyone bought one _*RECENTLY *_that they can recommend or warn me away from?

Dave
manuals@...

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


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Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Jean-Paul
 

Bonjour, ESR is a function of the frequency testing and to some extent the current When . In circuit checking old capacitors for failure, the very low capacitance is another clew, so exact ESR test is not often required.
For a modern Chinese cheapo, the Tenma 72-8155 is small but unsure the ESR capability


For better accuracy and frequency up to 300 kHz we use these vintage LCR meters.
HP 4332A
Wayne Kerr 3245
GenRad 1689


Jean-Paul


Re: recommended ESR meters these days

 


Re: Quick Calibration Question.

 

Hi Eric,
If the service manual doesn't explicitly say or if there is no picture
indicating what to use I would recommend the center graticule line as the
reference since non-linear and geometric distortion would increase as you
went further above or below the center horizontal graticule line.

On the other hand it is possible that the service manual doesn't specify one
because it doesn't matter.

Dennis Tillman W7pF

On 3/13/2020 12:03 AM, Eric wrote:
As I have a backlog of plugins to calibrate, I have a questions I
cant seem to find a good answer too. When calibrating a scope. Is the
reference the center of the graticule line, the bottom edge, or the
top edge. Common since tells me it should be the center of the
graticule is the alignment point. But I am hoping to confirm. Or am I
asking my analog scopes to be a little too accurate?
--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Quick Calibration Question.

Eric
 

Nah the ones I am working on are 7000 Series. So nothing but scale readout. and yea it made scene. consistency is the impotent part.

On 3/13/2020 12:10 AM, ArtekManuals wrote:
Unless your scopes have a numerical readout  (many do) yes your rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic IMO. I always try to center the trace on the graticule. But in reality you put the t5race on top of the line or under it as long as you that same point of reference when making measurements , i.e . if you calibrated with the trace above the graticule then when you go up say three divisions it is to "top" of that division line not centered

Hope that made sense

Dave

On 3/13/2020 12:03 AM, Eric wrote:
As I have a backlog of plugins to calibrate, I have a questions I cant seem to find a good answer too. When calibrating a scope. Is the reference the center of the graticule line, the bottom edge, or the top edge. Common since tells me it should be the center of the graticule is the alignment point. But I am hoping to confirm. Or am I asking my analog scopes to be a little too accurate?



Re: Quick Calibration Question.

ArtekManuals <manuals@...>
 

Unless your scopes have a numerical readout  (many do) yes your rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic IMO. I always try to center the trace on the graticule. But in reality you put the t5race on top of the line or under it as long as you that same point of reference when making measurements , i.e . if you calibrated with the trace above the graticule then when you go up say three divisions it is to "top" of that division line not centered

Hope that made sense

Dave

On 3/13/2020 12:03 AM, Eric wrote:
As I have a backlog of plugins to calibrate, I have a questions I cant seem to find a good answer too. When calibrating a scope. Is the reference the center of the graticule line, the bottom edge, or the top edge. Common since tells me it should be the center of the graticule is the alignment point. But I am hoping to confirm. Or am I asking my analog scopes to be a little too accurate?

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com
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Quick Calibration Question.

Eric
 

As I have a backlog of plugins to calibrate, I have a questions I cant seem to find a good answer too. When calibrating a scope. Is the reference the center of the graticule line, the bottom edge, or the top edge. Common since tells me it should be the center of the graticule is the alignment point. But I am hoping to confirm. Or am I asking my analog scopes to be a little too accurate?


Re: 2465 U950 Z AXIS IC Chip 155-0242-01 Fails After Re-installation

Don N3DEB
 

Technically there is a sweep, just not a visible one without adjusting grid bias.


Re: 466 Repair advice

Edward Prest
 

p.s. A lot of things happen when reduced scan is activated, h and v gains are halved, there is some extra circuitry activated with that too and the crt grid voltage goes from -1400v to something around -3000v to boost writing speed. iirc there are intensity voltage changes. Check the intensity switch, then low power supplies 140v and under to start..


Re: 2465 U950 Z AXIS IC Chip 155-0242-01 Fails After Re-installation

Don N3DEB
 

Current status, U950 and U650 are good (they operate fine in another 2465).


Re: 466 Repair advice

Edward Prest
 

You really need the manual but you can check the power supplies without it. pull off cover and bottom board has test points labeled. if intensity pot is 'not right', it may only be the reduced scan contacts not all working. but, again, you need at least the electronic manual to go further.


Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Bob Albert
 

My GR 1658 measures ESR at either of two frequencies.  It's a great bridge for most LCR measurements as well.
Bob
P.S. The nanoVNA does it too but is limited to high frequencies.

On Thursday, March 12, 2020, 06:26:07 PM PDT, John Crighton <john.crighton@...> wrote:

Hello Dave,

while you are looking for an ESR meter, why don't you knock up
a simple home made device, dead bug construction, say a 555
driving a transistor stage with a 10 ohm emitter resistor.
Arrange for 0.4V pp across the 10 ohm resistor.

A couple of leads from your 10 ohm resistor to the Capacitor Under Test.
Monitor the voltage across the 10 ohm resistor with your oscilloscope.

From your junk box use some resistors, say 1 ohm, 2 ohm, 4.7ohm etc to
go across your 10 ohm signal source to "calibrate"  your oscilloscope
reading.

This man here on you tube uses a 50 ohm signal source and his oscilloscope.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=115erzCCxgE

Here is the same man on youtube explaining his ESR meter.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmYAgat-sOQ

Build the oscillator section with the 10 ohm output resistor.
Use your oscilloscope as the man descibes in the first video.
This is quick and inexpensive for hobbyists on a budget.
If it takes more than 2 hours to assemble this you are slacking off.

If you are looking for something flash then buy a ready made one.

Regards,
John Crighton (hobbyist)
Sydney





----- Original Message -----
From: "ArtekManuals" <manuals@...>
To: <TekScopes@groups.io>; <TekScopes2@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, March 13, 2020 8:57 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] recommended ESR meters these days


Took out my (apparently not so) trusty ESR meter the other day and it eyes
had rolled back in its head and no amount of CPR would revive it.. Anyone
bought one _*RECENTLY *_that they can recommend or warn me away from?

Dave
manuals@...

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


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