Date   

Re: How to Remove Knobs

Harvey White
 

Assuming that they're press fit ONLY, make two identical 2 tined ramps, where the distance between forks will accommodate the shaft and nut (if any).  Place one as far in as it will get.  That protects the panel.  Put the other one in from the other side and slowly compress them, that ought to wedge the knob off.

Another option would be to make a knob puller that looks a bit like the gear pullers you can buy.  You'd have to have a "platform" that would brace against the front panel and pull out.

I like the two wedges better.  (something similar is used for removing jacobs chucks from JT tapers in machining).

Harvey

On 4/11/2020 10:57 AM, Rich Frahm wrote:
I am missing 2 knobs on my Tektronix 2430A...you can see one of them in the upper right of this photo: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DnL8WGdCWLjQ1aA9dq9oKvmY-p2O8ZOe/view?usp=sharing

I do 3D printing and want to see if I can make new ones so would like to remove one to inspect it. What's the proper way to remove these knobs?

Thanks!

Rich



Re: Artek Manuals

ken chalfant
 

Greetings, I have always been extremely happy with the quality of Dave’s (Artek) manuals. I think he does “Top Shelf” quality work.

Regards,

Ken

On 11Apr, 2020, at 4:21 PM, Bruce Lane <@kc7gr> wrote:

Most definitely. I've been a very happy customer for many moons. Dave
does some of the clearest scans I've ever seen.


On 11-Apr-20 14:56, Bill via groups.io wrote:
Are the Artek manuals full page? Some online manuals are very hard to read and if you enlarge them they go off the page.
Bill


--
---
Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR
https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bluefeathertech.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C2f0feaecf326422bed3208d7de66b698%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637222405034347784&amp;sdata=MvIy9UA%2FGDq6FJU%2FS6tNpt%2Btw%2FsVTMX6jRfICeVEGzI%3D&amp;reserved=0
kyrrin (at) bluefeathertech dot com
"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati" (Red Green)



Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

Brendan
 

On Sat, Apr 11, 2020 at 07:37 AM, Bill wrote:


As Maintenance Superintendent in a large Power Generation plant I had many
Electricians, Mechanics, and Instrument Technicians in my department. I set
high standards for my employees and expected my Supervisors to enforce those
standards. That said I am blown away and disgusted at the terrible shape of
some of the Oscilloscopes I see on EBAY. It's hard to believe that damage was
done on the job or was it? If any of my employees treated our tools and test
equipment in a similar manner I would of fired them.

Has any of you witnessed abuse of test equipment that would of led to
Oscilloscopes looking like they were dragged behind a tuck? Just curious
because I've never seen it in my 40 years on the job.

Thanks,
Bill
Of all my finds, the worst overall condition I have found are scopes that were used by the military. I have found some that were dirty, actually filthy but most of that was storage conditions. The military scopes were banged up pretty badly, broken knobs, dented cases. But even those were fun to get working and put back together although it took several "parts" scopes from the lot to do it.
Have a good weekend everyone.

Brendan


Re: Artek Manuals

Bill
 

I'll go ahead and order the CD. My searches here are overwhelming positive. Thank you Dave.
Bill


Re: Artek Manuals

ArtekManuals
 

Bill

Yes

They are full size some as big a 36x21  and 42 x 11 8^)
And 600dpi !!

Contact me off list for sample

Dave
manuals@...

On 4/11/2020 5:56 PM, Bill via groups.io wrote:
Are the Artek manuals full page? Some online manuals are very hard to read and if you enlarge them they go off the page.
Bill

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Artek Manuals

Bruce Lane
 

Most definitely. I've been a very happy customer for many moons. Dave
does some of the clearest scans I've ever seen.

On 11-Apr-20 14:56, Bill via groups.io wrote:
Are the Artek manuals full page? Some online manuals are very hard to read and if you enlarge them they go off the page.
Bill


--
---
Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR
http://www.bluefeathertech.com
kyrrin (at) bluefeathertech dot com
"Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati" (Red Green)


Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

Dave Seiter
 

All the damaged scopes I've received also looked like moving/shipping/storage abuse, including the otherwise pristine 7104 that looked like it had been hit by a forklift.  Of course, with 5xx series scopes, you get into situations where they have been stored in bad locations.  The most disgusting scope I've had was one that was brown inside and out.  Looked like a heavy smoker had used it 24/7 for years.  It was so bad, I didn't even want to deal with it and gave it away. I think it was a 7704 (non-A).
-Dave

On Saturday, April 11, 2020, 08:59:05 AM PDT, Jeff Kruth via groups.io <kmec=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Two things about equipment damage:

First one is many times irritated technicians who want to vent, or want newer gear, damage the older stuff, so that they can get rid of it.Once got a lot from NASA, all '60's -'70's vintage gear (this was in 1979), every piece of the 40 items or so was red tagged, meaning BAD, BER. Only a few pieces were actually defective with minor issues, all the rest was fine. They wanted new stuff!
Second issue is the people in charge of excessing equipment, both gov't and private companies, just really dont care about it. I mean REALLY dont care about it, it aint their stuff. They drop it, crash it together on pallets, breaking knobs and bending stuff, cut cords off, leave it outside, etc.  I once bought 45 7704 scopes that came from Andrews AFB where they had sat in the rain outside for 6 months. Paid <$10.00 ea for them. With plug-ins. Probably shouldnt have bought them as they were a lot of work to clean up and get going. About a 50% recovery rate. Sold the rest off to a well known mail order surplus house.
YMMVJeff Kruth

In a message dated 4/11/2020 10:42:49 AM Eastern Standard Time, @satbeginner writes:
I agree, I just cannot understand what people do with (their?) tools/equipment?
(Probably not theirs, so they don't appreciate the value)

My statement:

Tools do NOT break by themselves,

They're broken by the weirdos using them...

And it starts with using a screwdriver as chisel...


Artek Manuals

Bill
 

Are the Artek manuals full page? Some online manuals are very hard to read and if you enlarge them they go off the page.
Bill


Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

robert Johnson
 

personally I have only uses and worked with scope3s in a lab environment I think everyone respected the equipment, Scope probes got more abuse with being on soldering iron and soldering with them hooked up

On Saturday, April 11, 2020, 10:58:19 AM EDT, Craig Cramb <@Manfromtrane> wrote:

Bill,
Well it seems that if you don’t own it personally who cares to most employees. I’m in the commercial HVAC and the guys in our shop don’t care even about the DVM meters they have to use to protect their life. They carry them in buckets or loose in their tool bag.  As for scopes I’ve seen plenty of them messed up.  The 465 series seem to be in the roughest shape now. Don’t think I’ve ever seem one drug behind a truck yet.  The 2400 series I work with now most damage seems like maybe from the salvage distribution people that buy from company’s that are liquidating their inventory.  Personally I look them over pretty good before I purchase and try to only buy what are in the better shape unless I just need spare parts.

Craig
Electronixtoolbox
On Apr 11, 2020, at 9:37 AM, Bill via groups.io <ko4nrbs=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

As Maintenance Superintendent in a large Power Generation plant I had many Electricians, Mechanics, and Instrument Technicians in my department.  I set high standards for my employees and expected my Supervisors to enforce those standards.  That said I am blown away and disgusted at the terrible shape of some of the Oscilloscopes I see on EBAY.  It's hard to believe that damage was done on the job or was it?  If any of my employees treated our tools and test equipment in a similar manner I would of fired them.

Has any of you witnessed abuse of test equipment that would of led to Oscilloscopes looking like they were dragged behind a tuck?  Just curious because I've never seen it in my 40 years on the job.

Thanks,
Bill



Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

Greg Muir
 

Aside from causes of workplace damage there are many other forms of equipment abuse at play here. As for ePay items, it is a crapshoot as to how things may become damaged.

It should be remembered that when a piece of equipment is excessed and leaves the lab there is no telling as to how it will be handled by others. This is especially true if the needs are no longer warranted by the company and it is offed into the “outside world” and picked up possibly by some of us on this list.

Some examples:

Used equipment resellers – I have witnessed these people at surplus sales pulling up in big vans, bidding and winning large lots then simply throwing the equipment unprotected in the back of the vans. Many of these organizations were from out of state meaning that the equipment in large stacks had to survive a considerable trip to their headquarters.

Military Defense Property Disposal Offices (DPDOs) and commercial concerns – it is not uncommon to view online photos of equipment in these warehouses that has been stacked several items deep on pallets or thrown into large tri-wall containers for disposal. Since the term “disposal” is a literal term to them, why should a warehouse person untrained in delicate equipment handling exercise any care?

Individuals – many people selling this type of equipment on auction sites have no idea as to what the item may be or if they do have a small idea of what it may do still don’t have any knowledge of how to handle it. The obvious signs of these people is usually borne out in the description or the absence of one:
“Powers up – no further testing done”
“Don’t know what it is – don’t know how to test it”
“As-is condition” with no further description.
“Steampunk”
Or those $50 items being listed for thousands of dollars.
Etc.

I often cringe of some descriptions and seeing photos of people disassembling portions of a unit to show the internal condition of very delicate tuned cavities or other highly critical assemblies possibly affecting the electrical characteristics of them. I have purchased a few items that, when given close inspection after arrival confirm those signs of tampering and resultant damage. If they don’t know what they are doing, they should leave things alone and simply sell the unit. It serves no justice to the buyer to go beyond that point.

Dumpster divers who resell – I won’t go into this subject. It is self-explanatory.

There is much more.

Greg


Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

nonIonizing EMF
 

On Sat, Apr 11, 2020 at 08:58 AM, Jeff Kruth wrote:


First one is many times irritated technicians who want to vent, or want newer
gear, damage the older stuff, so that they can get rid of it.Once got a lot
from NASA, all '60's -'70's vintage gear (this was in 1979), every piece of
the 40 items or so was red tagged, meaning BAD, BER. Only a few pieces were
actually defective with minor issues, all the rest was fine. They wanted new
stuff!
I recall on more than one occasion a higher level than me advising that when you get the budget, make sure you spend all budgeted and then some so the subsequent budgets are less likely to be less than your previous.

Some days I wonder if I wasn't liked as much because I wanted to stay technical performing AR&D in Quality departments, at Perrigo (later to find means danger in Portuguese) in Allegan, directly in the Quality labs and consistently met and exceeded expectations until the false pretense charlatans acoustic hailing or whatever surveillance narcotics team came in and went more than active denial like the diplomatic staff in Cuba and China reported on CBS News 60 Minutes back in March and better on Sept 1st 2019 regarding health attacks.

I think some were irritated also when I suggested better laboratory test equipment, like a Tektronix oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer, to troubleshoot and do more internal maintenance and development since amazed me how I'd leave and metrology might try to perform repairs or make suggestions and leave me in a worse situation. Seems like I could get the work performed with a faster turn around time to keep operations up also... and again... along with budget saving. At least they invested in Fluke DVM/DMM's.

Instead of troubleshooting, with Tektronix oscilloscopes and spectrum analyzers, the equipment boards that failed... the preference was just throw away. Spend more in the long run to promote market cap and not even approve me investing in a rough shape scope or analyzer... plus I could train others too in maintenance of the maintenance equipment almost like a lathe is to a machinist being capable to rebuild itself.

At least I can own my own Tektronix and other brands lab test equipment now... not much else has changed seems from where I last left off in industry. Figured I'd note first hand... some want the budget spent when you get the approval whether you fully understand why some higher ups want items approved and others not. I almost think some higher ups don't want some stuff exposed and like with the mass spec or even more elaborate FTIR testing I'd note... they'd get nervous. That's equipment already owned. Now I think about it, when I noted I could detect heparin or warafin adulteration in raw materials with the FTNIR even and wanted to perform threshold experiments for the suspect raw materials, intermediates and finished products... that's when it got bad. I don't think they liked how I could even perform other spectroscopy methods with the electronics lab equipment.


Music made to be visualized on a Scope!

Michael W. Lynch
 

Interesting link to a video that shows music created specifically to invoke certain shapes on a scope. There is a Tek 475 and a 7623A in various parts of the video. The music is not Merle Haggard, Rolling Stones, or Beethoven, but quite fascinating just the same.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gibcRfp4zA&fbclid=IwAR2-XrvgU31rHuNFiUPH_f2BwjhOX_82i1I7wsJkZHcuD1kcODboEPEELHk


--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, Arkansas


Re: 533 scope

Thomas Dodge
 

Hi Jim,
Thanks for your email. When I first got this scope, my friend told me to
plug the scope into a Variac first and bring the voltage up slowly. So I
did that, and the scope came on at around 110 volts. So that part was ok. I
haven't looked at the scope lately because I would like to find out more
about working with the high voltage area. I hope you are ok and keeping
safe.

Tom Dodge

On Fri, Apr 3, 2020 at 12:24 PM Jim Ford <james.ford@...> wrote:

So where is local to you, Tom?And did you ever work for Orthodyne
Electronics? I was there from 2003 to 2006 and saw the name Tom Dodge on
some of the schematics.Pretty funny we have our last names on a large
number of American cars!Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy
smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Thomas Dodge <tdodge2404@...>
Date: 4/3/20 12:13 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject:
[TekScopes] 533 scope Hi,I haven't posted here much. I have a Tektronix 533
scope. When I turn iton, I don't get any intensity or screen brightness. I
even tried the probecalibration point to see if I even got that, but I
didn't. Any ideas? Itwould be cool if there was someone local to me that
could stop by sometimeand look at the scope when all the virus stuff is
over. I'm not familiartoo much with working with the high voltage. Thanks
very much.Tom Dodge



Re: How to Remove Knobs

Brad Thompson
 

Chuck Harris wrote on 4/11/2020 1:12 PM:

I have taken to using a pair of real needle nosed pliers
as an adjustable prying tool. But, then the only such knobs
I need to remove are the knobs under the CRT of a 2465 family
scope, and the scope's bezel makes a convenient purchase point.

The trick to not breaking the molded clips is to go slow and
uniformly pry under the skirt. If you let the knob cock to one
side, or the other it will break instantly.

Warming the knob makes it much more resilient to all sorts of
abuse.
Hello--

I've had some success in removing friction-grip knobs by placing a
length of cable-lacing twine (*) under the knob on either side and
simultaneously  pulling the free ends of the twine to apply upward
pressure on both sides of the knob. (*) Any heavy-gauge string or
dental floss would likely also work, but lacing twine is waxed for better traction.)

On another knob-related subject, someone in the group inquired about
a source of tiny Allen wrenches. I can offer six NOS  0.050-inch (1/2 by 1 3/4 inch legs)
Allen hex wrenches for $5.00 postpaid to U.S. locations.

Questions honored, PayPal welcomed.

73--

Brad  AA1IP


Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

stevenhorii
 

A short aside first: Jeff - I believe we used to attend the same hamfests -
at least the East coast ones (esp Gaithersburg). Often with the late Bill
Scripps. Contact me off list if you’d like some updates.

So far as purposefully broken equipment - if you watch any of the home
improvement shows you will note the enthusiasm and glee with which
demolition is done. A local college here did a fundraising using a defunct
piano. For $1.00, you could take a sledge hammer and give it a whack. The
piano was reduced to rubble within a few hours and they raised a
substantial sum from this.

As someone who has bought surplus, I have bought equipment that ranged from
looking new (e.g., accessories still in the sealed bags) to stuff that was
falling apart. Most of this was in the days when the DoD ran the surplus
property disposal. My first Tek scope - a 545 - was a DoD surplus purchase
($35). The packer-shipper charged me another $35. It was in gorgeous shape,
not even dusty inside - but did not even power up. It turned out to be a
bad resistor in the power supply. I replaced that and it worked like a
charm. One problem with DoD surplus was purchasing if you could not inspect
the item personally. With many packer-shippers in the business, you could
bid on anything at any DoD depot. I even won items from some base in Alaska
and a packer-shipper got it to me in good shape.

In more recent years, much of the surplus goes to resellers. Some of them
buy what is known as “scrap warranty” items. These are items that the
Government determines to be “sensitive” - that is containing technology
that could be used by non-friendly foreign governments. The best examples
are probably night vision equipment and anything with encryption hardware
in it. Dealers who buy this have to destroy it and in some cases, prove
that they did. The problem is that some commercial off-the-shelf stuff gets
included in lots that are scrap warranty. I have been to scrap yards with
late model Tek and HP scopes, signal generators, and spectrum analyzers
that look like they were run over by a bulldozer. Some of this stuff (when
the label was still visible) was current catalog merchandise.

Some of you may know the Swiss Nagra tape recorders. These were used to
record sound for nearly all movies from the late ‘50s through the ‘00s. The
Government used these - they are quite expensive (look at eBay). A friend
of mine went to a GSA sale and the guys unloading the truck from the
Government agency were throwing them off the back of the truck. Some had
also been smashed with hammers before being thrown off the truck. Tektronix
scopes suffered a similar fate. 7000-series plug-ins had bent frames,
broken circuit boards, and smashed knobs. From potentially usable equipment
to metal scrap.

Just some of what I have seen when it comes to finding stuff in very
beat-up condition and some of the reasons for it.

Steve H.




On Sat, Apr 11, 2020 at 11:59 Jeff Kruth via groups.io <kmec=
aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Two things about equipment damage:

First one is many times irritated technicians who want to vent, or want
newer gear, damage the older stuff, so that they can get rid of it.Once got
a lot from NASA, all '60's -'70's vintage gear (this was in 1979), every
piece of the 40 items or so was red tagged, meaning BAD, BER. Only a few
pieces were actually defective with minor issues, all the rest was fine.
They wanted new stuff!
Second issue is the people in charge of excessing equipment, both gov't
and private companies, just really dont care about it. I mean REALLY dont
care about it, it aint their stuff. They drop it, crash it together on
pallets, breaking knobs and bending stuff, cut cords off, leave it outside,
etc. I once bought 45 7704 scopes that came from Andrews AFB where they
had sat in the rain outside for 6 months. Paid <$10.00 ea for them. With
plug-ins. Probably shouldnt have bought them as they were a lot of work to
clean up and get going. About a 50% recovery rate. Sold the rest off to a
well known mail order surplus house.
YMMVJeff Kruth

In a message dated 4/11/2020 10:42:49 AM Eastern Standard Time,
@satbeginner writes:
I agree, I just cannot understand what people do with (their?)
tools/equipment?
(Probably not theirs, so they don't appreciate the value)

My statement:

Tools do NOT break by themselves,

They're broken by the weirdos using them...

And it starts with using a screwdriver as chisel...





Re: How to Remove Knobs

Chuck Harris
 

I have taken to using a pair of real needle nosed pliers
as an adjustable prying tool. But, then the only such knobs
I need to remove are the knobs under the CRT of a 2465 family
scope, and the scope's bezel makes a convenient purchase point.

The trick to not breaking the molded clips is to go slow and
uniformly pry under the skirt. If you let the knob cock to one
side, or the other it will break instantly.

Warming the knob makes it much more resilient to all sorts of
abuse.

-Chuck Harris

Craig Cramb wrote:


Rich,
What's the proper way to remove these knobs?
Pulling these off sometimes is no big deal but there is a big risk of breaking one of the clips inside the knob. I take my wife’s hair drier and warm it up pretty good to soften the plastic then use two small flat blade screw drivers under the back and light twist at the same time. It should pop right off. While it is still warm.

Craig
On Apr 11, 2020, at 9:57 AM, Rich Frahm <criageek@...> wrote:

I am missing 2 knobs on my Tektronix 2430A...you can see one of them in the upper right of this photo: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DnL8WGdCWLjQ1aA9dq9oKvmY-p2O8ZOe/view?usp=sharing

I do 3D printing and want to see if I can make new ones so would like to remove one to inspect it. What's the proper way to remove these knobs?

Thanks!g

Rich





Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

Bill
 

All our high dollar test equipment was leased.  We would routinely switch it out as our needs changed.   Test equipment specifically designed for obsolete equipment, i.e. Distributed Controls, would be sold along with the equipment.  Many plants would buy it for spare parts.  Not every plant chased new technology like we did.  Corporate Engineers sometimes have too much time on their hands and would blow my budget right out of the water.
Bill

On Saturday, April 11, 2020, 12:00:25 PM CDT, Colin Herbert via groups.io <colingherbert=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Worse than that, how about the totally moronic use of a chisel as a screwdriver? I haven't quite seen that , but a flatmate once decided that a nice Sabatier Kitchen knife would make a good screwdriver - there were perfectly good screwdrivers in the house, too. Grrrr!

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of satbeginner
Sent: 11 April 2020 15:43
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

I agree, I just cannot understand what people do with (their?) tools/equipment?
(Probably not theirs, so they don't appreciate the value)

My statement:

Tools do NOT break by themselves,

They're broken by the weirdos using them...

And it starts with using a screwdriver as chisel...


Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

greenboxmaven
 

On 4/11/20 12:48 PM, Chuck Harris wrote:
Chuck- you totally hit the target! And, Bill, you are dealing with people who (almost certainly) work in one complex or facility on a fairly constant and predicable schedule. Unlike HVAC, elevator techs, IT or others who have their hearts in their throats and blood pressure at the bursting point every second in fear of "WHAT the--- are they going to do to us next?!!
Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY




It is more than a little amazing to me that so many of you
guys are so isolated from the workings of the companies
that employ you that you don't already know what happens
to your surplus equipment. You ought to leave your white
collar offices, and go slumming one day to see it for yourself.

-Chuck Harris

Bill via groups.io wrote:
As Maintenance Superintendent in a large Power Generation plant I had many Electricians, Mechanics, and Instrument Technicians in my department. I set high standards for my employees and expected my Supervisors to enforce those standards. That said I am blown away and disgusted at the terrible shape of some of the Oscilloscopes I see on EBAY. It's hard to believe that damage was done on the job or was it? If any of my employees treated our tools and test equipment in a similar manner I would of fired them.

Has any of you witnessed abuse of test equipment that would of led to Oscilloscopes looking like they were dragged behind a tuck? Just curious because I've never seen it in my 40 years on the job.

Thanks,
Bill




Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

Colin Herbert
 

Worse than that, how about the totally moronic use of a chisel as a screwdriver? I haven't quite seen that , but a flatmate once decided that a nice Sabatier Kitchen knife would make a good screwdriver - there were perfectly good screwdrivers in the house, too. Grrrr!

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of satbeginner
Sent: 11 April 2020 15:43
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

I agree, I just cannot understand what people do with (their?) tools/equipment?
(Probably not theirs, so they don't appreciate the value)

My statement:

Tools do NOT break by themselves,

They're broken by the weirdos using them...

And it starts with using a screwdriver as chisel...


Re: Rough Shape Oscilloscopes

Bill
 

I was an Instrument Technician for many years before going into Management.  In Power Plants we had a tremendous amount pressure on us to get the units back on line when they tripped.  Forced Outages were big pressure points for all of us.  I've had the Plant Manager, Operations and Maintenance superintendents stand over me while I was trying to figure out why the Generator wouldn't sync, control valves swinging all over the place, transmitters way off, etc.  So that said I know pressure and can say I didn't take it out on my tools or test equipment.  On occasion I would get frustrated and verbally abuse management but I knew where the Red line was.
I remember one technician who was my working partner for many years throw a Fluke meter off the stack because they wouldn't replace it for him.  He told them he dropped it.  It fell over 300 feet to the concrete below.  That meter had been flaky for a long time.  I understood his frustration and told him to just put it in with the test equipment we were sending out for cals.  He was too pissed to be rational.  Not condoning his actions!!  His nick name was Chuckles.Bill

On Saturday, April 11, 2020, 11:42:16 AM CDT, greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I DO understand how they get that way!! In a lab, that is one thing. The
nasty ones were used in the field, by a harried person who can't even
start the service call they are on withut being interupted every pico
second for progress reports, or having three more repair calls shoved
down their throats, is a totally different scenerio.  Taking any more
care ( read that TIME, and Carbon Unit EXPENSE ) than what is required
to keep the instruments nominally operational is impossible, indeed,
forbidden.  Don't blame the skilled technicians- blame MANGEMENT, and
that is not a mis-spelling! Don't worry about the rough instruments
going to the trash if I find them interesting and affordable, my main
pleasure is taking  battered or basket cases and restoring them.

      Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY International Union of Elevator
Constructors, Local 62, Retired


On 4/11/20 10:42 AM, satbeginner wrote:
I agree, I just cannot understand what people do with (their?) tools/equipment?
(Probably not theirs, so they don't appreciate the value)

My statement:

Tools do NOT break by themselves,

They're broken by the weirdos using them...

And it starts with using a screwdriver as chisel...