Date   
Stan Griffiths' Memorial

 

I received this from Stan's daughters Valarie and Tricia:

Dear friends and family,
We are deeply grateful to all of you for all your expressions of sympathy,
and offers of support since Dad passed at the end of January, and we know
everyone is very interested in knowing our plans for a memorial gathering.
We regret to say that, due to Corona Virus concerns, we believe having any
kind of gathering in the near future might be hazardous to certain family
members' and dear elders health. The last thing we want to do is celebrate
the life and legacy of our father, and create a situation where we are
compelled to mourn others.
If you want to remember our father in some way during this time, please do
it by donating a little money to a reputable charity, like the ones listed
here: The American Diabetes Association, The Arthritis Foundation, The
American Heart Association, or the Bonnie Hays Small Animal Shelter. Dad
was an insulin dependent diabetic, a cancer and stroke survivor, and had
multiple heart procedures done in the last couple of decades, so any
assistance that can be given to support research into treatments, or meeting
the needs of low income sufferers of these illnesses, would be a fitting
tribute at this time.
We will make plans to gather and remember, and try to have a firm date by
the end of May, when we are truly past the current health crisis. We are
being cautious, perhaps overly so, but we deeply love our parents' surviving
siblings, so forgive us for clinging a bit.
We hope everyone in your circles continues in good health, recovers from any
illnesses quickly and without complication, and we will communicate our
plans to you as soon as we are able.
In gratitude,
Valarie and Tricia

Re: 2430A oscilloscope error code 4000

Szabolcs Szigeti
 

Hi,

There was a change sometime, when Tek changed from external battery to
internal, built into the nvram.
It is actully quite easy to patch en external battery into it. See my
earlier post on this: https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/136993

Szabolcs

Gary Robert Bosworth <@grbosworth> ezt írta (időpont: 2020. márc.
15., Vas 3:02):

I have a Tek 2430A oscilloscope. Upon boot-up, it gives me an error code
4000 which is for the Front Panel. It says to check in the Service Manual
for the cause, but the Service Manual does not give a reason for this
error. I suspect that this error is common, and I wonder if any other
users have seen this before and know what causes it. If I press Menu Off,
and then press Auto Setup, then the scope functions perfect in every way
and is completely usable. It is interesting to note that this model never
had a backup battery, and there is a bus wire soldered in its place from
the factory.



Re: Another 465B Back In Service

Abc Xyz
 

Terrific! Now you can Fix mine! lol

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020, 11:29 PM Don N3DEB via Groups.Io <dbawatsonville=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Had a backup 465B taken out of service sitting on my hobbyist repair bench
for about a year - long journey (hopefully) ended.

Symptom was losing trace after warm up, power supply folded over. The
folder over at first was after a few minutes, gradually occurring almost
immediately. While that seems like an easy fix based on all the group
discussion, it was not because of some cascading failures. I replaced the
power supply caps while I was at it.

All told I replaced quite an assortment of failed parts to get the trace
back that included voltage regulation components. I lost my patience
searching for the intermittent tantalum and injected DC slowly until I got
the expected but unnerving "Pop" and column of smoke. Replaced the roasted
peanut and got my trace back.

Next replaced the rest of the tantalums and the trace sharpened and other
performance issues corrected.

I often use the somewhat controversial "IBM service practice" of just
clipping out the component and soldering the replacement to the remaining
leads. I did not want to remove any boards, nor cause any new faults by
introducing a bad solder joint that could not be located by flipping the
board over. I don't have the confidence nor inclination to install and
potentially diagnose a bag of tantalums soldered in that were viewed from
only one side of the boards. A newbie can mange this type of repair.

I would like to thank the group, as I would never have attempted scope
repairs without the information here.

I would also encourage anyone new to this to jump in, read the service
manual (did I say yet "read the service manual"), patiently follow service
steps, then ask for help.




Another 465B Back In Service

Don N3DEB
 

Had a backup 465B taken out of service sitting on my hobbyist repair bench for about a year - long journey (hopefully) ended.

Symptom was losing trace after warm up, power supply folded over. The folder over at first was after a few minutes, gradually occurring almost immediately. While that seems like an easy fix based on all the group discussion, it was not because of some cascading failures. I replaced the power supply caps while I was at it.

All told I replaced quite an assortment of failed parts to get the trace back that included voltage regulation components. I lost my patience searching for the intermittent tantalum and injected DC slowly until I got the expected but unnerving "Pop" and column of smoke. Replaced the roasted peanut and got my trace back.

Next replaced the rest of the tantalums and the trace sharpened and other performance issues corrected.

I often use the somewhat controversial "IBM service practice" of just clipping out the component and soldering the replacement to the remaining leads. I did not want to remove any boards, nor cause any new faults by introducing a bad solder joint that could not be located by flipping the board over. I don't have the confidence nor inclination to install and potentially diagnose a bag of tantalums soldered in that were viewed from only one side of the boards. A newbie can mange this type of repair.

I would like to thank the group, as I would never have attempted scope repairs without the information here.

I would also encourage anyone new to this to jump in, read the service manual (did I say yet "read the service manual"), patiently follow service steps, then ask for help.

locked Re: Tesla Coil help needed

Roy Thistle
 

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 09:18 AM, Tony Fleming wrote:


I have a Tesla Coil
Hi Tony:
I spent the last couple of hours searching through the various Tektronix equipment that we have... I didn't find any Tesla coils.
Though a Google search on the exact phrase "Tesla Coil" got almost 8.1 million hits.
Sadly, I only got 148 hits on the exact phrase "Tektronix 530"
Best regards and best wishes.
Roy

Re: 2430A oscilloscope error code 4000

Dewey Wyatt
 

When you get the code 4000 what is passing and what is failing?Below the
code it throughs you get a pass and fail on error checks.

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020, 10:02 PM Gary Robert Bosworth <@grbosworth>
wrote:

I have a Tek 2430A oscilloscope. Upon boot-up, it gives me an error code
4000 which is for the Front Panel. It says to check in the Service Manual
for the cause, but the Service Manual does not give a reason for this
error. I suspect that this error is common, and I wonder if any other
users have seen this before and know what causes it. If I press Menu Off,
and then press Auto Setup, then the scope functions perfect in every way
and is completely usable. It is interesting to note that this model never
had a backup battery, and there is a bus wire soldered in its place from
the factory.



Re: recommended ESR meters these days

 

Hi John,

I enjoyed reading your post. I share your likeness for your Universal AVOmeter. I constantly use something less sophisticated : an not-too-old Radio Shack multimeter with a mirror backed needle that I also resuscitated after putting it aside for decades. I like to see a needle moving instead of the flickering numbers of a modern autoranging meter. And yes, I also had damage from the battery used in the ohms reading, which was left in the instrument for 20 years...

Harvey said: "Time vs. money is a tradeoff everyone makes". This is true, but participants in this TekScopes group we are not big followers of this tradeoff. Otherwise we would not care for old Tektronix equipment but would retire them all and buy very inexpensive modern electronic instruments with much superior performances. We are here because we have the time, and we don't care much about money.

The time invested here gives us SATISFACTION. It is like putting the time to learn to play a Beethoven sonata on an old piano instead of going to Youtube and listen to it performed in the Carnegie Hall.

Regards,
Ernesto

Re: 2430A oscilloscope error code 4000

Dewey Wyatt
 

The 4430a has a battery in side the dallas  ram chip. If it goes out you loose all the cal info stored there. Then its recal time with a new chip. I made a backup once it was recalibrated and now mine are in zif sockets.

Sent from Mail ( https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986 ) for Windows 10

*From:* Gary Robert Bosworth ( @grbosworth )
*Sent:* Saturday, March 14, 2020 10:02 PM
*To:* TekScopes@groups.io
*Subject:* [TekScopes] 2430A oscilloscope error code 4000

I have a Tek 2430A oscilloscope.  Upon boot-up, it gives me an error code 4000 which is for the Front Panel.  It says to check in the Service Manual for the cause, but the Service Manual does not give a reason for this error.  I suspect that this error is common, and I wonder if any other users have seen this before and know what causes it.  If I press Menu Off, and then press Auto Setup, then the scope functions perfect in every way and is completely usable.  It is interesting to note that this model never had a backup battery, and there is a bus wire soldered in its place from the factory.

( http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient ) Virus-free. www.avg.com ( http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient )

( #DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2 )

Re: recommended ESR meters these days

John Crighton
 

Hello Ernesto, Harvey and the Group,

my initial interest in this thread is due to having a Tektronix
TDS 320 with a dud switchmode style power supply.
Tektronix or the power supply maker do not supply a
circuit diagram.
I am an old guy, a hobbyist and retired. I lean towards
Ernesto's methods. I like this 99 cent ESR Test Adapter.
https://www.yumpu.com/la/document/view/18546928/print-99-cent-esr-test-adapter

I take your point Harvey when you said,
" Time vs money is a tradeoff everyone makes."
You are right.

This thread has made me think about that.
If you are cashed up and might not be around much longer
then enjoy yourself. Buy some nice gear. Why not?

I live 35 Km north of Sydney. I have not been able to buy
a box of tissues or a toilet roll from my local supermarket
for over a weak due to people panic buying in fear of the
corona virus. I am mentioning this because I am using tissues
and bog roll paper to clean up the mess made by a leaking
Energiser 1.5V D cell.
Many of the components on the inside of my beloved
AVO Model 8 mk2 multimeter are green with corrosion.

In the 1960s I hankered after this meter. Here is picture
http://www.richardsradios.co.uk/avo8.html

I finally got my 1960s AVO meter in the 1990s and today
it still works but is suffering from leaking battery damage
due to my negligence.

The Trade Off Harvey, do I save my toilet tissue paper for
toilet use or use it on my 50 plus years old multimeter?

Still on the "Trade Off" theme, up till now, I have spent
over 15 hours cleaning the components on the inside of my
multimeter meter with more work to do.
Common sense tells me it is not worth it but I feel I must
reduce the corrosion damage and fix this meter.
Maybe also as a punishment for not checking the
batteries in my equipment.

Your points Harvey, Ernesto and Dave who wants to
"buy" an ESR meter because he is running out of time,
have made me think about time and how I spend it.

Excellent Thread, thanks for that.

Regards,
John Crighton
Sydney

----- Original Message -----
From: "Harvey White" <madyn@...>
To: <TekScopes@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 10:14 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] recommended ESR meters these days


There's a tradeoff here.

When I was (very) much younger, I built things from whatever I could get from old TV sets, a source of which (non functioning) I was lucky enough to find. I traded off time stripping the old TVs for parts I did not have the money to buy. And yes, there was a store near me that likely had every part I needed. I couldn't get there, and I didn't have the money.

When I had a steady job, some years after I'd gotten out of college, I had a better lab, a few more parts, some more ambitious designs, and I'd started gathering parts from the local university or the throwaways from the business where I worked. Most of my money went into infrastructure, such as better test equipment and a unimat lathe. (You try making holes in a plate of aluminum for mounting a C mount camera lens (used epoxy and a nut from a light assembly (1-20 thread, Imperial), and grinding cone to make the hole.)

Once I got enough money, and the like, I started buying things where the things that I wanted were easier to buy, without having to invent the infrastructure, make the case, make the PC board, design it, debug it, and THEN continue with what I wanted to do when I decided I needed one of those.

Different people have different resources at differing times of their lives. Some are lucky, some not. Some are lucky enough to build everything, some need more.

As far as ESR is concerned, I do have a Sprague LC75, and an HP 4262A, both of which work. I've been lucky.

Time vs money is a tradeoff everyone makes.

Harvey


On 3/14/2020 11:35 AM, Ernesto wrote:
LOL! You people have to spend one hundred dollars in gadgets like the DE-5000 to measure ESR?

As a professional electrical engineer with large experience in the design and development of complex electronic hardware and firmware, I enjoy the use of my ONE RESISTOR ESR meter (see my previous post).

I measured (for fun) in 10 minutes the ESR of about 10 electrolytic capacitors mounted on a dual preamplifier board that is over 40 years old.

- I clipped the ground of the oscilloscope X1 probe on the negative of the electrolytic, and the probe on its positive.
- I clipped to the ONE RESISTOR of 1000 ohm a 10V positive 100Khz signal from my function generator (with the same ground as the oscilloscope), and touched with the other lead of the resistor the positive of the capacitor under test. The resistor became in fact a current source.
- I observed on the oscilloscope, set to 10 mV/div, the 100Khz signal in the equivalent scale of 1 ohm ESR per division. I found some good capacitors and many bad ones! (its amazing how well an amplifier can work even with some "bad" electrolytics...)

It could not be easier!

Ernesto



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

ENOUGH}Re: [TekScopes] recommended ESR meters these days

ArtekManuals
 

ALL

I know I started this thread...Thanks for the input guys
 things must be slow as participation has gone above and beyond... Take the lions share of this over to DIY guys and lets get back to fixing tek scopes and  meters.
Dennis had the right idea on the I have been hacked thread now time to end this one too

Dave
manuals@...

On 3/14/2020 9:38 PM, Abc Xyz wrote:
Well said Harvey.

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020, 4:14 PM Harvey White <madyn@...> wrote:

There's a tradeoff here.

When I was (very) much younger, I built things from whatever I could get
from old TV sets, a source of which (non functioning) I was lucky enough
to find. I traded off time stripping the old TVs for parts I did not
have the money to buy. And yes, there was a store near me that likely
had every part I needed. I couldn't get there, and I didn't have the
money.

When I had a steady job, some years after I'd gotten out of college, I
had a better lab, a few more parts, some more ambitious designs, and I'd
started gathering parts from the local university or the throwaways from
the business where I worked. Most of my money went into infrastructure,
such as better test equipment and a unimat lathe. (You try making holes
in a plate of aluminum for mounting a C mount camera lens (used epoxy
and a nut from a light assembly (1-20 thread, Imperial), and grinding
cone to make the hole.)

Once I got enough money, and the like, I started buying things where the
things that I wanted were easier to buy, without having to invent the
infrastructure, make the case, make the PC board, design it, debug it,
and THEN continue with what I wanted to do when I decided I needed one
of those.

Different people have different resources at differing times of their
lives. Some are lucky, some not. Some are lucky enough to build
everything, some need more.

As far as ESR is concerned, I do have a Sprague LC75, and an HP 4262A,
both of which work. I've been lucky.

Time vs money is a tradeoff everyone makes.

Harvey


On 3/14/2020 11:35 AM, Ernesto wrote:
LOL! You people have to spend one hundred dollars in gadgets like the
DE-5000 to measure ESR?
As a professional electrical engineer with large experience in the
design and development of complex electronic hardware and firmware, I enjoy
the use of my ONE RESISTOR ESR meter (see my previous post).
I measured (for fun) in 10 minutes the ESR of about 10 electrolytic
capacitors mounted on a dual preamplifier board that is over 40 years old.
- I clipped the ground of the oscilloscope X1 probe on the negative of
the electrolytic, and the probe on its positive.
- I clipped to the ONE RESISTOR of 1000 ohm a 10V positive 100Khz signal
from my function generator (with the same ground as the oscilloscope), and
touched with the other lead of the resistor the positive of the capacitor
under test. The resistor became in fact a current source.
- I observed on the oscilloscope, set to 10 mV/div, the 100Khz signal in
the equivalent scale of 1 ohm ESR per division. I found some good
capacitors and many bad ones! (its amazing how well an amplifier can work
even with some "bad" electrolytics...)
It could not be easier!

Ernesto




--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

2430A oscilloscope error code 4000

Gary Robert Bosworth
 

I have a Tek 2430A oscilloscope. Upon boot-up, it gives me an error code 4000 which is for the Front Panel. It says to check in the Service Manual for the cause, but the Service Manual does not give a reason for this error. I suspect that this error is common, and I wonder if any other users have seen this before and know what causes it. If I press Menu Off, and then press Auto Setup, then the scope functions perfect in every way and is completely usable. It is interesting to note that this model never had a backup battery, and there is a bus wire soldered in its place from the factory.

TDS3000B Training board?

 

Did anyone ever reverse engineer on of these?

David

Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Abc Xyz
 

Well said Harvey.

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020, 4:14 PM Harvey White <madyn@...> wrote:

There's a tradeoff here.

When I was (very) much younger, I built things from whatever I could get
from old TV sets, a source of which (non functioning) I was lucky enough
to find. I traded off time stripping the old TVs for parts I did not
have the money to buy. And yes, there was a store near me that likely
had every part I needed. I couldn't get there, and I didn't have the
money.

When I had a steady job, some years after I'd gotten out of college, I
had a better lab, a few more parts, some more ambitious designs, and I'd
started gathering parts from the local university or the throwaways from
the business where I worked. Most of my money went into infrastructure,
such as better test equipment and a unimat lathe. (You try making holes
in a plate of aluminum for mounting a C mount camera lens (used epoxy
and a nut from a light assembly (1-20 thread, Imperial), and grinding
cone to make the hole.)

Once I got enough money, and the like, I started buying things where the
things that I wanted were easier to buy, without having to invent the
infrastructure, make the case, make the PC board, design it, debug it,
and THEN continue with what I wanted to do when I decided I needed one
of those.

Different people have different resources at differing times of their
lives. Some are lucky, some not. Some are lucky enough to build
everything, some need more.

As far as ESR is concerned, I do have a Sprague LC75, and an HP 4262A,
both of which work. I've been lucky.

Time vs money is a tradeoff everyone makes.

Harvey


On 3/14/2020 11:35 AM, Ernesto wrote:
LOL! You people have to spend one hundred dollars in gadgets like the
DE-5000 to measure ESR?

As a professional electrical engineer with large experience in the
design and development of complex electronic hardware and firmware, I enjoy
the use of my ONE RESISTOR ESR meter (see my previous post).

I measured (for fun) in 10 minutes the ESR of about 10 electrolytic
capacitors mounted on a dual preamplifier board that is over 40 years old.

- I clipped the ground of the oscilloscope X1 probe on the negative of
the electrolytic, and the probe on its positive.
- I clipped to the ONE RESISTOR of 1000 ohm a 10V positive 100Khz signal
from my function generator (with the same ground as the oscilloscope), and
touched with the other lead of the resistor the positive of the capacitor
under test. The resistor became in fact a current source.
- I observed on the oscilloscope, set to 10 mV/div, the 100Khz signal in
the equivalent scale of 1 ohm ESR per division. I found some good
capacitors and many bad ones! (its amazing how well an amplifier can work
even with some "bad" electrolytics...)

It could not be easier!

Ernesto





Re: I've been hacked

Abc Xyz
 

Same here Jim.

We tried everything to get that Junk off our Laptops. It was so bad we
could not use them. Geek Squad got it all off for us.

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020, 5:03 PM Jim Ford <james.ford@...> wrote:

I have to disagree, at least here in the sanctuary state of California,
Chuck. My wife just had her computer streamlined within the last week
by the Geek Squad, and they had us sign no such waiver. I asked the
tech if they were contracted by the FBI, and he said no, they are not.
Possibly in Kentucky, where Best Buy and/or Geek Squad is/are
headquartered, he said.

Does this mean you shouldn't be careful about Big Brother? No, not at
all, but our experience with Geek Squad was very routine.

Jim Ford

------ Original Message ------
From: "Chuck Harris" <cfharris@...>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 3/11/2020 12:09:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] I've been hacked

Geek Squad "technicians" get paid by the FBI to take
special training courses on finding and identifying
hidden pornography, and illegal documents. They get
paid a bounty for every suspicious thing they turn
in to the FBI.

That's unconstitutional, you say?

No, it isn't. They are a private entity, and you have
to sign a waiver that gives them permission to search
for such stuff before they will work on your computer.

Anything they find, they will send right out to the FBI
for evaluation...

Best not use Geek Squad for any computer that has been
involved with anything you wouldn't want to see in the
Washington Post.

Also, a lot of the spam payloads turn your windows machine
into child pornography servers.

If Geek Squad finds that, you will get to spend a few
weeks in jail.

Me personally, if Geek Squad was my only choice, I would
remove and destroy the drive, and put a new install of
windows on a new drive, and shrug my shoulders for being
stupid enough to use Windows, and stupid enough not to
make off machine backups...

-Chuck Harris

Abc Xyz wrote:
I took my Infected Units over to Best Buy & let the Geek Squad Remove
the
Virus's. They have Access to Tools we can't get. Plus, they Installed
their
own Detection Software.




Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Bob Albert
 

Did you read this?
Tesla coil

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Tesla coil

Tesla used these circuits to conduct innovative experiments in electrical lighting, phosphorescence, X-ray gener...
|

|

|


Bob

On Saturday, March 14, 2020, 05:08:48 PM PDT, Tony Fleming <czecht@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for a very quick reply!
I'm not as smart in these fields as you are, but I love to play with stuff
and make some sample "demo units" that would put a "growing seed" in some
person or a kid's head, like it happen to me, when I was young. I think the
hands-on and some sound (or any visual effect)  created by the
experiment is very powerful. At least it was in my brain, but life took me
to a different route and I had to take care of my family and ..... Now,
when kids are on their own for a while, is the time to play with my toys!
Everything to me is a toy because I'm young in my heart and brain - not the
body.... I love oscilloscopes and DMM's or special meters that I own. I'm
very visual, photography was and is my other hobby and even
professional work in the past .... so seeing something that we aren't
equipped to see, electrons + many other like oxygen....is something that I
love. I love  to show this to anyone who wants to, because I love people
very much. I also play with Arduino and ESP32/8266.... Raspberry PI.... but
it is hard for me to remember stuff. Dyslexia and Fibromyalgia with PTSD
combination ++ some other health stuff is slowing my brain down, but I try
and try again, until I get it or not.
I've made some simple Jacob Ladders with neon sign transformer or from a
Microwave Oven Transformers.... but I don't know how to make stuff on my
own, without having schema and I love to have a video also, of the project
when I can. So I can "copy" someone's design but now I can't make complex
stuff on my own.
Example is my Tesla Kit, that my friend gave me - it is here on the
youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt4y6j-foyY&list=PLv52A7rm-UViZEOlzZfZOB9Gl8cjS3ze5&index=2&t=0s
(I
also started not long ago a website:  https://tonysfun.com/   )
I have the parts (not knowing if all parts are there or not for sure, but
most are there) and one sheet of some instructions, but that is all. I've
asked many youtube people, who made these powerful Tesla Coils, but nobody
answered at this time.
Would you be willing to take me one step at a time and make a schema that I
can follow?
I'm very careful and take many precaushions before playing with Kilovolts
or even just with any voltage, since I hate to burn or break anything....
I' also on Skype (under  czecht@... - I was born in Czechoslovakia
but I escaped in 1981 to USA) so we could see each other while talking
about anything you like me to know.
One of the scopes I have is older Tektronix 2465 DMM, it came busted but a
simple switch cleaning fixed that problem.
Also I have a modern 100 Mhz color scope, Aktakom - I think it is a copy of
and a  OWON.... can't remember the model number- and a Aktakom
generator...+ many more "gizmos", as I call them.
But I would not know how to make a oscilloscope from parts, but I do
desolder many boards, TV's ... whatever I find on the curb or someone gives
me, so I can get parts I can use.
I'm willing to learn if you like to share your time and knowledge, since I
work for myself as a computer repairman.... Another hobby  that became
business, but I love computers like my Oscilloscopes....
Sorry for a long email and thanks again for your reply.
Have a great weekend.
Tony


On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 12:04 PM Ernesto <ebordon@...> wrote:

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 09:07 AM, Tony Fleming wrote:


Thanks for your information. I'm not an engineer in electronics, but I
do what
I can, including buying meters that I use. I do have couple scopes, but I
usually just pull out my meter for the job at hand..... By same tocan I'm
interested in learning electronics, after 50+ years of hiatus so it is
little
harder to learn than when I was young.
If you have a place where I can learn stuff like you've mentioned, I'm
all
ears.
Have a great weekend.
Hi Tony,

First of all, there is no reason you cannot learn electronics after a 50+
hiatus.  I keep learning electronics, some of it from this group, after
70++ years of existence. Instead being harder, as seniors we have more
patience and perseverance.

I assume you have a good background in physics, electricity.  To progress
to "electronics" it is best to have some passion.  Nothing inspires this
passion better than the oscilloscope, the KING of the electronic
instruments.
The oscilloscope is the only means to VISUALIZE  the abstract electrical
signals.  This visualization stays with us all life long and makes
electronics something CONCRETE and familiar.

So if you want to become expert in electronics, my advice is:  BUILD AN
OSCILLOSCOPE FROM SCRATCH  (with some nice CRT tube, of course)

Right after college I did this for a couple of months,  designing and
building with an old 4 inch CRT an oscilloscope in the style of Tektronix.
It was a dual-channel with all options, triggered with all options plus an
X-Y display, and built 100% with transistors in 1971.  With an 1800 V
high-voltage supply running at 35 Khz,  I designed and built the HV
transformer and even the 50 Hz (in my country) transformer from their basic
materials.  All with little money, ha ha!

This launched my career of designer of analog electronics.  At that time
the progressive introduction of integrated circuits allowed me to learn the
digital stuff,  and I became a champion of designing WITH ECONOMY  (minimum
number of components). This economy stopped being an issue shortly
thereafter, so I changed to optimum functionality no matter what, and the
field of firmware, microprocessors and programmable LSI gave me a lust for
complexity. Finally I became a software programmer, "software architect"
and now... happily retired... I am finally back at tinkering with hardware
and oscilloscopes.

There is a reason why some electrical engineers are attracted to a
"TekScopes" grouop instead of "Power Distribution" or "High Voltage
Transmission Lines" discussion groups.

Ernesto




I've been hacked PLEASE END THIS NOW

 

I appreciate all the suggestions I have received but this is an indication that the conversation has gone beyond the point where it has any relevance to Tektronix.

If you wish to continue your correspondence please take it off line.
Thank you,
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Ford
Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2020 5:02 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] I've been hacked

I have to disagree, at least here in the sanctuary state of California, Chuck. My wife just had her computer streamlined within the last week by the Geek Squad, and they had us sign no such waiver. I asked the tech if they were contracted by the FBI, and he said no, they are not.
Possibly in Kentucky, where Best Buy and/or Geek Squad is/are headquartered, he said.

Does this mean you shouldn't be careful about Big Brother? No, not at all, but our experience with Geek Squad was very routine.

Jim Ford

------ Original Message ------
From: "Chuck Harris" <cfharris@...>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 3/11/2020 12:09:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] I've been hacked

Geek Squad "technicians" get paid by the FBI to take special training
courses on finding and identifying hidden pornography, and illegal
documents. They get paid a bounty for every suspicious thing they turn
in to the FBI.

That's unconstitutional, you say?

No, it isn't. They are a private entity, and you have to sign a waiver
that gives them permission to search for such stuff before they will
work on your computer.

Anything they find, they will send right out to the FBI for
evaluation...

Best not use Geek Squad for any computer that has been involved with
anything you wouldn't want to see in the Washington Post.

Also, a lot of the spam payloads turn your windows machine into child
pornography servers.

If Geek Squad finds that, you will get to spend a few weeks in jail.

Me personally, if Geek Squad was my only choice, I would remove and
destroy the drive, and put a new install of windows on a new drive, and
shrug my shoulders for being stupid enough to use Windows, and stupid
enough not to make off machine backups...

-Chuck Harris

Abc Xyz wrote:
I took my Infected Units over to Best Buy & let the Geek Squad
Remove the Virus's. They have Access to Tools we can't get. Plus,
they Installed their own Detection Software.






--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Tony Fleming
 

Thank you very much for a very quick reply!
I'm not as smart in these fields as you are, but I love to play with stuff
and make some sample "demo units" that would put a "growing seed" in some
person or a kid's head, like it happen to me, when I was young. I think the
hands-on and some sound (or any visual effect) created by the
experiment is very powerful. At least it was in my brain, but life took me
to a different route and I had to take care of my family and ..... Now,
when kids are on their own for a while, is the time to play with my toys!
Everything to me is a toy because I'm young in my heart and brain - not the
body.... I love oscilloscopes and DMM's or special meters that I own. I'm
very visual, photography was and is my other hobby and even
professional work in the past .... so seeing something that we aren't
equipped to see, electrons + many other like oxygen....is something that I
love. I love to show this to anyone who wants to, because I love people
very much. I also play with Arduino and ESP32/8266.... Raspberry PI.... but
it is hard for me to remember stuff. Dyslexia and Fibromyalgia with PTSD
combination ++ some other health stuff is slowing my brain down, but I try
and try again, until I get it or not.
I've made some simple Jacob Ladders with neon sign transformer or from a
Microwave Oven Transformers.... but I don't know how to make stuff on my
own, without having schema and I love to have a video also, of the project
when I can. So I can "copy" someone's design but now I can't make complex
stuff on my own.
Example is my Tesla Kit, that my friend gave me - it is here on the
youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt4y6j-foyY&list=PLv52A7rm-UViZEOlzZfZOB9Gl8cjS3ze5&index=2&t=0s
(I
also started not long ago a website: https://tonysfun.com/ )
I have the parts (not knowing if all parts are there or not for sure, but
most are there) and one sheet of some instructions, but that is all. I've
asked many youtube people, who made these powerful Tesla Coils, but nobody
answered at this time.
Would you be willing to take me one step at a time and make a schema that I
can follow?
I'm very careful and take many precaushions before playing with Kilovolts
or even just with any voltage, since I hate to burn or break anything....
I' also on Skype (under czecht@... - I was born in Czechoslovakia
but I escaped in 1981 to USA) so we could see each other while talking
about anything you like me to know.
One of the scopes I have is older Tektronix 2465 DMM, it came busted but a
simple switch cleaning fixed that problem.
Also I have a modern 100 Mhz color scope, Aktakom - I think it is a copy of
and a OWON.... can't remember the model number- and a Aktakom
generator...+ many more "gizmos", as I call them.
But I would not know how to make a oscilloscope from parts, but I do
desolder many boards, TV's ... whatever I find on the curb or someone gives
me, so I can get parts I can use.
I'm willing to learn if you like to share your time and knowledge, since I
work for myself as a computer repairman.... Another hobby that became
business, but I love computers like my Oscilloscopes....
Sorry for a long email and thanks again for your reply.
Have a great weekend.
Tony

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 12:04 PM Ernesto <ebordon@...> wrote:

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 09:07 AM, Tony Fleming wrote:


Thanks for your information. I'm not an engineer in electronics, but I
do what
I can, including buying meters that I use. I do have couple scopes, but I
usually just pull out my meter for the job at hand..... By same tocan I'm
interested in learning electronics, after 50+ years of hiatus so it is
little
harder to learn than when I was young.
If you have a place where I can learn stuff like you've mentioned, I'm
all
ears.
Have a great weekend.
Hi Tony,

First of all, there is no reason you cannot learn electronics after a 50+
hiatus. I keep learning electronics, some of it from this group, after
70++ years of existence. Instead being harder, as seniors we have more
patience and perseverance.

I assume you have a good background in physics, electricity. To progress
to "electronics" it is best to have some passion. Nothing inspires this
passion better than the oscilloscope, the KING of the electronic
instruments.
The oscilloscope is the only means to VISUALIZE the abstract electrical
signals. This visualization stays with us all life long and makes
electronics something CONCRETE and familiar.

So if you want to become expert in electronics, my advice is: BUILD AN
OSCILLOSCOPE FROM SCRATCH (with some nice CRT tube, of course)

Right after college I did this for a couple of months, designing and
building with an old 4 inch CRT an oscilloscope in the style of Tektronix.
It was a dual-channel with all options, triggered with all options plus an
X-Y display, and built 100% with transistors in 1971. With an 1800 V
high-voltage supply running at 35 Khz, I designed and built the HV
transformer and even the 50 Hz (in my country) transformer from their basic
materials. All with little money, ha ha!

This launched my career of designer of analog electronics. At that time
the progressive introduction of integrated circuits allowed me to learn the
digital stuff, and I became a champion of designing WITH ECONOMY (minimum
number of components). This economy stopped being an issue shortly
thereafter, so I changed to optimum functionality no matter what, and the
field of firmware, microprocessors and programmable LSI gave me a lust for
complexity. Finally I became a software programmer, "software architect"
and now... happily retired... I am finally back at tinkering with hardware
and oscilloscopes.

There is a reason why some electrical engineers are attracted to a
"TekScopes" grouop instead of "Power Distribution" or "High Voltage
Transmission Lines" discussion groups.

Ernesto




Re: I've been hacked

Jim Ford
 

I have to disagree, at least here in the sanctuary state of California, Chuck. My wife just had her computer streamlined within the last week by the Geek Squad, and they had us sign no such waiver. I asked the tech if they were contracted by the FBI, and he said no, they are not.
Possibly in Kentucky, where Best Buy and/or Geek Squad is/are headquartered, he said.

Does this mean you shouldn't be careful about Big Brother? No, not at all, but our experience with Geek Squad was very routine.

Jim Ford

------ Original Message ------
From: "Chuck Harris" <cfharris@...>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 3/11/2020 12:09:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] I've been hacked

Geek Squad "technicians" get paid by the FBI to take
special training courses on finding and identifying
hidden pornography, and illegal documents. They get
paid a bounty for every suspicious thing they turn
in to the FBI.

That's unconstitutional, you say?

No, it isn't. They are a private entity, and you have
to sign a waiver that gives them permission to search
for such stuff before they will work on your computer.

Anything they find, they will send right out to the FBI
for evaluation...

Best not use Geek Squad for any computer that has been
involved with anything you wouldn't want to see in the
Washington Post.

Also, a lot of the spam payloads turn your windows machine
into child pornography servers.

If Geek Squad finds that, you will get to spend a few
weeks in jail.

Me personally, if Geek Squad was my only choice, I would
remove and destroy the drive, and put a new install of
windows on a new drive, and shrug my shoulders for being
stupid enough to use Windows, and stupid enough not to
make off machine backups...

-Chuck Harris

Abc Xyz wrote:
I took my Infected Units over to Best Buy & let the Geek Squad Remove the
Virus's. They have Access to Tools we can't get. Plus, they Installed their
own Detection Software.

Re: recommended ESR meters these days

Harvey White
 

There's a tradeoff here.

When I was (very) much younger, I built things from whatever I could get from old TV sets, a source of which (non functioning) I was lucky enough to find.  I traded off time stripping the old TVs for parts I did not have the money to buy.  And yes, there was a store near me that likely had every part I needed.  I couldn't get there, and I didn't have the money.

When I had a steady job, some years after I'd gotten out of college, I had a better lab, a few more parts, some more ambitious designs, and I'd started gathering parts from the local university or the throwaways from the business where I worked.  Most of my money went into infrastructure, such as better test equipment and a unimat lathe.  (You try making holes in a plate of aluminum for mounting a C mount camera lens (used epoxy and a nut from a light assembly (1-20 thread, Imperial), and grinding cone to make the hole.)

Once I got enough money, and the like, I started buying things where the things that I wanted were easier to buy, without having to invent the infrastructure, make the case, make the PC board, design it, debug it, and THEN continue with what I wanted to do when I decided I needed one of those.

Different people have different resources at differing times of their lives.  Some are lucky, some not.  Some are lucky enough to build everything, some need more.

As far as ESR is concerned, I do have a Sprague LC75, and an HP 4262A, both of which work.  I've been lucky.

Time vs money is a tradeoff everyone makes.

Harvey

On 3/14/2020 11:35 AM, Ernesto wrote:
LOL! You people have to spend one hundred dollars in gadgets like the DE-5000 to measure ESR?

As a professional electrical engineer with large experience in the design and development of complex electronic hardware and firmware, I enjoy the use of my ONE RESISTOR ESR meter (see my previous post).

I measured (for fun) in 10 minutes the ESR of about 10 electrolytic capacitors mounted on a dual preamplifier board that is over 40 years old.

- I clipped the ground of the oscilloscope X1 probe on the negative of the electrolytic, and the probe on its positive.
- I clipped to the ONE RESISTOR of 1000 ohm a 10V positive 100Khz signal from my function generator (with the same ground as the oscilloscope), and touched with the other lead of the resistor the positive of the capacitor under test. The resistor became in fact a current source.
- I observed on the oscilloscope, set to 10 mV/div, the 100Khz signal in the equivalent scale of 1 ohm ESR per division. I found some good capacitors and many bad ones! (its amazing how well an amplifier can work even with some "bad" electrolytics...)

It could not be easier!

Ernesto


Re: Tek 576 Curve Tracer HV Replacement Transformer

Michael W. Lynch
 

Rick,
Thanks for asking.  I have reached out to the factory for an update.  They were supposed to ship this week, but I have not received tracking.  The delay was reported to be with the factory which produced the cores.  There is no US supplier for these bare cores, so we are held hostage by the foreign factory's ability to produce/deliver the goods.  This corona virus crap has everyone all stirred up around the world.  I hope to have some good news early next week. 

Very sorry for the delay. 

Sincerely,

Michael Lynch 479-226-0126 Home Phone479-477-1115 Cell Phonemlynch001@...@gmail.commlynch003@...

On Saturday, March 14, 2020, 10:43:30 AM CDT, garp66 <@garp66> wrote:

hi Michael,

    Re:  bulk Replacement HV Transformers  for the Trk 576 CT


Status ?

Do we know when these will be ready to be shipped out to us ?

thank you,
rick