Date   

Newbie with a new (to me) Tek 2445

 

Hello all, I'm new to the group, and almost new to the world of Oscilloscopes. I say almost new because I did build a Heathkit O'scope (and a signal generator, and a few other kits) back in the early 70s. I'm not sure what, if anything, I did with the Scope back then other than sell it and the signal generator off some time after I built them, so I'm pretty much a neophyte when it comes to Oscilloscopes.


I'm retired, recently renewed my interest in Amateur radio, upgraded to Extra class, decided I wanted to spend more time dabbling in electronics and figured an Oscilloscope would be a useful instrument to have around. After a bit of looking around, I bought a Tek 2445 (no alpha) on Ebay. I wasn't expecting much from my purchase - it was sold "as-is, untested, parts or repair" but it did power up and one of the listing photos showed some alpha characters (but no trace) on the display, so I expected that it had some issues that would need diagnosis and repair.


While waiting for it to arrive (it took Fedex 5 days to get it from California to Michigan) I ordered a couple 200MHz probes (cheaper than 150MHz probes) and downloaded the Operator and Service manuals.


Fedex delivered my Scope Friday morning. I unboxed it, plugged it in, powered it up, and first surprise - no smoke on power up (unlike the Kenwood TR-7500 2m transceiver I bought a couple of months ago), and no POST error message. There were some alpha characters, but no trace, visible on the screen so I connected my one probe (the second didn't arrive till Saturday) to channel 1 and clipped the other end to the calibration port. After fiddling around a bit with the position, intensity, focus, astigmatism, volts/div and sec/div controls and adjusting the probe compensation, I got a pretty decent square wave on the display.


Then I exercised the operating controls - volts/div, sec/div, delta-t, delta-s, tracking and so forth and everything seemed to work properly. Next I hooked up my arbitrary waveform generator and ran through the menu of standard waveforms - sine, square, triangle, rising and falling sawtooth - and all looked fine. Finally, I left it running connected to the waveform generator with a sine wave for about three hours and it was still humming happily along.


So overall I'm pretty happy. My scope seems to be functioning well, on channel 1 at least, although I still need to check out channels 2, 3 and 4 and try to determine how accurate it is. After that? I'm thinking running through the functional and performance checks in chapter 4 of the service manual, followed by the adjustments in chapter 5. Then there is the issue of electrolytic capacitors. I've got a 30+ year old machine with an unknown service history so I have to assume there are some tired electrolytics in there just waiting to blow their tops.


I have a pretty good component checker and will be purchasing an Anatek Blue ESR meter very shortly. What is the smart thing to do? Replace all electrolytics, test all & replace only the bad, replace all PS & regulator electrolytics, test & replace only the bad PS & regulator electrolytics, test & replace based on the results of the chapter 4 & 5 adjustments? Beyond electrolytics, what else need I look for (lube the fan motor for starters)?


I'm looking forward to your responses and suggestions. In the meantime, I may just go take a look at that Kenwood TR-7500 transceiver .



TIA, Lee N8VYH


FOR SALE: TEK 7904A and Plug-Ins

Richard Solomon <dickw1ksz@...>
 

I have a 7904A in excellent working
condition (has Option 03 installed).

Comes with the following Plug-Ins:
7A19
7A26
7B92A
7B70

I have a picture showing a 500 MHz
signal if anyone is interested.

Pick up ONLY in Vail, AZ (20m
SSE of Tucson).

$350 for the lot.

73, Dick, W1KSZ


Re: Tek 2465 PSU test

 

The fan motor can become seized by hardened lubricant. Or there may be internal mechanical damage.  Hard lubricant will prevent it from turning on its own but you should be able to turn it by hand.  Mechanical damage can be about anything. There is a small "set screw" in the rear of the fan motor that is used to adjust end play of the armature.  The set screw is usually accessible through a hole in the PCB directly behind and centered on the fan motor.  A fine screw driver can reach it and allow you to loosen the screw to see if the motor can turn on its own.  I removed the set screw on mine and dropped a couple drops of quality oil down there.  A few turns and it was loose.  I put the set screw back and adjusted it snug, then backed off a half turn or so.  The motor started on its own after that.  I let it run a while, adjusted the set screw for minimum noise, and its been fine since.  I was cautioned not to put locktite on the set screw as it can migrate to the motor bearings and seize them all over again.

From: "Ryan Stasel rstasel@uoregon.edu [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: "TekScopes@yahoogroups.com" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2016 2:44 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 2465 PSU test

Just figured out that the fan motor is completely seized. Yay, another thing to fix!  :p

Ryan Stasel
IT Operations Manager, SOJC
University of Oregon

Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2016, at 00:35, Ryan Stasel rstasel@uoregon.edu [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Thanks!

Going by that I bit the bullet and hooked everything up. And it powered up! Except the fan. No spin.

I assume it should run all the time, or is there a temp sensor?

Lastly, I got the sticker off probably 98% with just pealing slowly. The rest I'll try some of the suggestions. :)

Ryan Stasel
IT Operations Manager, SOJC
University of Oregon

Sent from my iPhone

On May 12, 2016, at 23:42, machine guy machineguy59@yahoo.com<mailto:machineguy59@yahoo.com> [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:



You must have a load for the PSU to operate.  Its a Switch Mode Power Supply (SMPS) and that technology demands a load within a certain range, a wide range, but not zero.  The manual escribes the minimum load required for operation.  Otherwise, the hissing you hear was the switching transistors running nearly wild.
I just hooked mine up and gave it a go.  But I was meticulous in the recapping job.

From: "Ryan Stasel rstasel@uoregon.edu<mailto:rstasel@uoregon.edu> [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>>
To: "TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>>
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2016 1:21 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek 2465 PSU test

  All,

First, thanks for all the suggestions for removing the sticker. I’ll try what I can and respond back soon.

First though, I thought since I just finished up the PSU (recapping, and replacing a few resistors), I wanted to test it. I put the PSU back together, screwed it into the case, reinstalled the fan but left all the connections unplugged. Hit the power button, and it didn’t blow up. But, it did make a bit of a hissing sound occasionally, and the fan did not spin.

Looking at the manual (which my grandfather, Russ, may have written at least part of), it seems I have to have the unit hooked up to test, or go out and buy/build myself some test loads. Is that the case? Anyone have tips on this? Or should I just hook things up and give it a go? Should the fan power up even when other things are disconnected, or is the whole board just not powering on because there’s no load?

Thanks much!

-Ryan Stasel

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Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

Ed Breya
 

OK, here's a new one. We've talked many times about washing of the old 500 series and such (with water, detergents, and walnut shell blasting, etc), but I don't recall anything about the newer (<30-40 years old) models. Some of my 7K series mainframe units could use a good internal cleaning of dust and debris. What's the current philosophy on washing/cleaning them? It's not a restoration or failure-fix issue - just internal cosmetics and visibility. Some are quite filthy inside, and it would be nice to clean them up for easier maintenance. I have done a lot with a toothbrush and compressed air, where accessible, but there's a certain level of grime that just needs something a little more intense. I'm talking here about whole-scope cleaning - individual boards or subassemblies are no problem in the sink.

Ed


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

R. Stasel
 

All,

I was able to clean the blue filter. I removed it (easy, just slide "up" then lift out). A little bit of WD40 removed the worst of the sticker residue, and then a good cleaning with Novus 1 (cleaner) removed the remainder, and the WD40 residue. Novus (3 through 1) is amazing stuff if you ever need to re-finish something like a Fluke 8000 series screen protector.

I was also able to get the fan running on this 2465 by desoldering, and then adding a drop or two of 3-in-1 oil to the back and front of the shaft. Then once it was back together, and the cage just started to barely spin, I hit it with a blast from the air compressor (very very briefly) to get it unstuck, and it's worked since. I'm going to let it sit for a week or so and then make sure the fan still starts.

Thanks for all the help and advise. Amazing how much traffic my question produced. :) awesome list!

Ryan Stasel
IT Operations Manager, SOJC
University of Oregon

Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2016, at 15:43, Valentin val72ua@gmail.com [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi All.
Ronsonol lighter fuel my choice.

Valentin.


On Flat painted panels, If gunk is really stuck on I have had good luck with
a wet (with water or other cleaner) popsicle stick cut square or a bamboo
chopstick going close to flat on painted surfaces wood grain end into the
goo.

But at that stick level you are always at risk of some paint scratching. But
I have had stuff that was sort of take off with a screwdriver gouging before
I get things and then the stick will take off what's left with out more
damage.

John

To get the leftover gummy stuff off, try hot tap water and some Dawn dish
soap. If you have to do any scraping, use a credit card like someone else
mentioned.

Vince.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Yahoo Groups Links



unidentified 560-series test plug-in

Kurt Rosenfeld
 

I picked up an unusual plug-in for 560-series scopes. I can't figure out who made it. Its construction is similar to Tek gear from the period, but the work is not as clean. It is the only plug-in I've seen that has a power lamp and a fan (blades missing). Anybody have any idea where it came from?

Here are some photos:
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B-Q3jyZPb-C1X3hhQ3hoY1FHVUU&;amp;usp=sharing https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B-Q3jyZPb-C1X3hhQ3hoY1FHVUU&;amp;usp=sharing


Yahoo for sale - UPDATE!

Vince Vielhaber
 

This just came in minutes ago.

Warren Buffet and Dan Gilbert (Quicken Loans) are teaming up to buy
Yahoo!'s assets.

Vince.
--
Michigan VHF Corp. http://www.nobucks.net/ http://www.CDupe.com/
http://www.foggymist.com The Foggy Mist Emporium


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

Valentin
 

Hi All.
Ronsonol lighter fuel my choice.

Valentin.


On Flat painted panels, If gunk is really stuck on I have had good luck with
a wet (with water or other cleaner) popsicle stick cut square or a bamboo
chopstick going close to flat on painted surfaces wood grain end into the
goo.

But at that stick level you are always at risk of some paint scratching. But
I have had stuff that was sort of take off with a screwdriver gouging before
I get things and then the stick will take off what's left with out more
damage.

John

To get the leftover gummy stuff off, try hot tap water and some Dawn dish
soap. If you have to do any scraping, use a credit card like someone else
mentioned.

Vince.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

ykochcal
 

On Flat painted panels, If gunk is really stuck on I have had good luck with
a wet (with water or other cleaner) popsicle stick cut square or a bamboo
chopstick going close to flat on painted surfaces wood grain end into the
goo.

But at that stick level you are always at risk of some paint scratching. But
I have had stuff that was sort of take off with a screwdriver gouging before
I get things and then the stick will take off what's left with out more
damage.

John


To get the leftover gummy stuff off, try hot tap water and some Dawn dish
soap. If you have to do any scraping, use a credit card like someone else
mentioned.

Vince.


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

Vince Vielhaber
 

Yeah, it pops out. I thought you already had it out. I removed two last
year but don't remember where I popped it out from, I'm thinking from the
bottom.

Vince.


On Fri, May 13, 2016 6:07 pm, Ryan Stasel rstasel@uoregon.edu [TekScopes]
wrote:
Is it relatively easy to remove the blue filter so I could clean
elsewhere?

Ryan Stasel
IT Operations Manager, SOJC
University of Oregon

Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2016, at 14:41, David DiGiacomo
telists@davmar.org<mailto:telists@davmar.org> [TekScopes]
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:



On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 3:06 PM,
<chipbee40@yahoo.com<mailto:chipbee40@yahoo.com>> wrote:

On the 22xx scopes the filter is polycarbonate.
(Tried laser cutting it, miserable smoky fail)
Are you mixing up the implosion protector (clear polycarbonate) with the
display filter (clear or blue acrylic)?










--
Michigan VHF Corp. http://www.nobucks.net/ http://www.CDupe.com/
http://www.foggymist.com The Foggy Mist Emporium


Re: TEK 2455B CALIBRATION - request for tips and tricks about alignment -

bc
 

Speaking of calibration, I would think that the pairing of the A5 board with the rest of the boards would be kind of critical to maintain calibration. Does the A5 board know when it gets swapped with another and then require recalibration?

I'm still trying to think of a way to backup my ER1400 in my 2465, though I think this is a bit easier to do than the 2465A/B since the SRAM is bigger (the ER1400 only has 175 bytes in it, even if it's 100 14-bit words!) Then again -35V is another story!

I was looking at fleabay and saw an ER1400 made by Microchip? I thought the only sources are from GI and Mitsubishi, or did Microchip get rights to produce these chips? Or are these fakes like a lot of other stuff on the bay?


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

R. Stasel
 

Is it relatively easy to remove the blue filter so I could clean elsewhere?

Ryan Stasel
IT Operations Manager, SOJC
University of Oregon

Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2016, at 14:41, David DiGiacomo telists@davmar.org<mailto:telists@davmar.org> [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:



On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 3:06 PM, <chipbee40@yahoo.com<mailto:chipbee40@yahoo.com>> wrote:

On the 22xx scopes the filter is polycarbonate.
(Tried laser cutting it, miserable smoky fail)
Are you mixing up the implosion protector (clear polycarbonate) with the
display filter (clear or blue acrylic)?


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

Vince Vielhaber
 

To get the leftover gummy stuff off, try hot tap water and some Dawn dish
soap. If you have to do any scraping, use a credit card like someone else
mentioned.

Vince.

On Fri, May 13, 2016 4:53 pm, Ryan Stasel rstasel@uoregon.edu [TekScopes]
wrote:
And it won't damage the plastic? I worry about using solvents, heptane
being a pretty decent one... :/ would certainly help if we knew what
plastic the parts were. :(

Ryan Stasel
IT Operations Manager, SOJC
University of Oregon

Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2016, at 12:18, David DiGiacomo
telists@davmar.org<mailto:telists@davmar.org> [TekScopes]
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:



On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 1:01 PM, Keith Smith
<kahsmith@gmail.com<mailto:kahsmith@gmail.com>> wrote:
I've had great success with lemon oil (furniture polish), butter, peanut
butter; almost anything with fatty oils in it. Let it sit for a while
and
wipe off.
But then you have to clean the oil off your plastic :(

Not to be judgmental, but WD-40, lemon cleaner, oil, alcohol are all
the wrong answer.

Bestine Thinner (aka heptane) is the right chemical for the job. It
works well and doesn't leave a residue. Everything else mentioned is
far inferior.







--
Michigan VHF Corp. http://www.nobucks.net/ http://www.CDupe.com/
http://www.foggymist.com The Foggy Mist Emporium


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

David DiGiacomo
 

On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 3:06 PM, <chipbee40@yahoo.com> wrote:

On the 22xx scopes the filter is polycarbonate.
(Tried laser cutting it, miserable smoky fail)
Are you mixing up the implosion protector (clear polycarbonate) with the
display filter (clear or blue acrylic)?


Re: 465B traces bent out of shape -

 

I did not have any luck getting reimbursement from UPS when they
damaged my 7904 in shipping. I guess from your earlier post, the UPS
store packed it. In that case, I hope they take some responsibility.
You would hope that if they packed it that they would do it right.

On 13 May 2016 14:14:51 -0700, you wrote:

Mini update: Waiting to hear from UPS after they examine all the pictures I sent them , including the trace "before" and "after".

I also found another topic on the same subject titled "Tek 465 Trace distortion". Now I don't feel especially unlucky, just the regular amount.
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/conversations/topics/108946 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/conversations/topics/108946


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

 

On Fri, 13 May 2016 13:17:12 -0600, you wrote:

On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 1:01 PM, Keith Smith <kahsmith@gmail.com> wrote:
I've had great success with lemon oil (furniture polish), butter, peanut
butter; almost anything with fatty oils in it. Let it sit for a while and
wipe off.
But then you have to clean the oil off your plastic :(

Not to be judgmental, but WD-40, lemon cleaner, oil, alcohol are all
the wrong answer.

Bestine Thinner (aka heptane) is the right chemical for the job. It
works well and doesn't leave a residue. Everything else mentioned is
far inferior.
If it is heptane, then wouldn't it just be a purer form of naphtha,
lighter fluid, and white gas?

Not having any additives would be an advantage when cleaning plastics.


Re: 465B traces bent out of shape -

Dimitri
 

Mini update: Waiting to hear from UPS after they examine all the pictures I sent them , including the trace "before" and "after".

I also found another topic on the same subject titled "Tek 465 Trace distortion". Now I don't feel especially unlucky, just the regular amount.
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/conversations/topics/108946 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/conversations/topics/108946


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

chipbee40
 

On the 22xx scopes the filter is polycarbonate.
(Tried laser cutting it, miserable smoky fail)


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <telists@...> wrote :

On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 2:53 PM, Ryan Stasel <rstasel@... mailto:rstasel@...> wrote:
>
> And it won't damage the plastic? I worry about using solvents, heptane being a pretty decent one... :/ would certainly help if we knew what plastic the parts were. :(

No, it's fine.

The filters are acrylic.


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

David DiGiacomo
 

On Fri, May 13, 2016 at 2:53 PM, Ryan Stasel <rstasel@uoregon.edu> wrote:

And it won't damage the plastic? I worry about using solvents, heptane being a pretty decent one... :/ would certainly help if we knew what plastic the parts were. :(
No, it's fine.

The filters are acrylic.


Re: Removing sticker residue from 2465 screen cover

bc
 

Though I don't think the blue sheet is made of polystyrene , I don't think I'd try heptane, xylene, acetone, MEK, methylene chloride, etc. without testing it in an inconspicuous spot first. These chemicals have the potential of eating certain plastics, much more so than isopropanol.

I just tried some WD40 on some of the pressure sensitive adhesive residue on my 2465 (most of it is packing tape, and some paper label). Fortunately the residue was on the blue metal chassis and the WD40 did help considerably, got most of it off, at least it does not look like tape was there anymore. A lot of the results was from using elbow grease however, but the WD40 helped prevent removed stuff to not stick back down. The textured aspect unfortunately let some dirt with pressure sensitive junk end up stuck between high points in the paint.

Don't forget water is a good solvent! Perhaps even hot water!

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