Date   
Re: Packing a scope for shipping

Tom Gardner
 

On 23/02/16 23:14, 'Dennis Tillman' @Dennis_Tillman_W7pF [TekScopes] wrote:

It turns out I was very fortunate it did arrive damaged because I got to sit
with the technician while he diagnosed the problem, disassembled the scope,
replaced the CRT, and recalibrated the instrument. I was amazed, and
instantly knew I wanted to work for Tek.
I had a similar high regard of HP's customer service in the late 70s / early
80s. It had a similar effect on me in the late 80s - a decade after I had turned
down an offer from HP because they only had a measly three weeks annual holiday.

By the way, few people know that Tektronix invented the packing worms that
everybody uses today. They hold the patent on packing worms.
Thanks for reminding me of that; I had forgotten it.

Re: Packing a scope for shipping

 

Tek shipped their 453 portable scopes in a box with a specially molded
Styrofoam container that the scope sat in. It held the scope securely and
had about 2 inches of foam between the scope and the box.

My 453 arrived that way in 1968. The bad news is that my scope's CRT was bad
when my 453 arrived. The local Tek Field Engineer was horrified that that
happened. He said it was one of the few times he didn't check the instrument
first before delivering it to me, the customer.

It turns out I was very fortunate it did arrive damaged because I got to sit
with the technician while he diagnosed the problem, disassembled the scope,
replaced the CRT, and recalibrated the instrument. I was amazed, and
instantly knew I wanted to work for Tek.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

By the way, few people know that Tektronix invented the packing worms that
everybody uses today. They hold the patent on packing worms.

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 7:58 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm not
so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am interested
in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people regard as
necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The only
recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand bench PSUs.
Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new polyester bed
pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely
curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if I
ever want to reclaim storage space.

Posted by: tggzzz@...

Re: Applications for 012-0841--00 and 012-0842-00 Cables?

 

Hi Egge Siert,
I'm not sure I understand comment exactly and I never received the original
post to the forum but I will try to answer what I think was the original
question. This cable was for the 134 Current Probe Amplifier.

The reason it is a male to female cable is that the 134 was too big to plug
directly into the female BNC on the front panel of most vertical amplifiers.


Tek's solution was to provide a small plastic mounting bracket which could
be placed on the side panel of a 7000 scope with two machine screws that fit
neatly through the vent holes on the side panel. The 134 would then be
inserted into the bracket. Then you connected the female end of the short
(18inch/45cm) male to female cable into the back of the 134 and the other
end of the cable into the vertical amplifier input.
I haven't ever seen the 12 foot cable but I have a few of the 18 inch cables
that came with the 134. Since the 134 was designed to drive a 50 ohm input
it could probably drive a 12ft cable without a problem for situations where
you could not have the 134 closer to the scope.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 2:05 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Applications for 012-0841--00 and 012-0842-00 Cables?

Hi to All,
Both 50R? cables are fitted with a BNC Male on one end and a BNC Female on
the other end. They look like a extended (12ft) 012-0104-00 (Type 134
Accessoire). Does anybody known why these are made or to which instrument
they belong?
Greetings,
Egge Siert
------------------------------------
Posted by: eggeja2@...
------------------------------------

Re: Need Help - Tektronix 7844 Dual Beam Scope

tweedradio00
 

So both beams have the same intensity problems?



It appears so. I feed the Calibrator to both inputs of a 7A26 Vertical
module (left slot). BEAM 1 and 2 are set to LEFT. Using the Vertical
positioning on the vertical module, I can moving either beam on and off
screen. They both appear to be the correct display (Vertical Gain and Time
Base working normally) but the brightness is very high and I have no control
over either BEAM INTENSITY or FOCUS ON EITHER CHANNEL.



Using the BEAM FINDER (with both beams positioned off screen) BEAM 1
produces a soft display - not really bright, and both INTENSITY and FOCUS
sort of work poorly. BEAM 2 Beam Finder produces a very bright display with
no control of INTENSITY or FOCUS.


What about the readout intensity?

No readout is visible.



Excessive beam current should cause the power supply to reset instead
of just affecting the 17 volt output.



I was just monitoring the 17 volt line - others may change as well. This
effects seems intermittent as I just tried to monitor the other supply
voltages under the same conditions and the power supply was not affected.
I'm cautious about leaving the display on very long - don't want to burn the
CRT or possibly fry the power supply.



Those amplifier outputs control the focus and not the intensity.

TP1186 and TP2086 shown on schematic 14 are the z-axis outputs which
control intensity.



INTENSITY controls seem to connect to GRID 2 - I'm missing something here -
can you give me an idea how this circuit works or where I might look it up?
I thought I remembered an old Tektronix book on CRT design but can't find
it.



I checked TP 1186 BEAM 1 (Card A21) - adjusting BEAM INTENSITY - voltage is
+9.75 CCW to + 68.5 Volts CW. So far I have not been able to get as BEAM 2
card for TP2086.



Any ideas are welcome - it's been over 40 years since I did service for a
living - brain cells are rusty.



Jim



From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2016 12:28 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Need Help - Tektronix 7844 Dual Beam Scope





So both beams have the same intensity problems?

What about the readout intensity?

Defocusing the beams will help prevent phosphor damage until the
intensity can be controlled.

On 22 Feb 2016 07:10:23 -0800, you wrote:

An old coot from the tube era needs some help with a Tek 7844.

Trace Intensity seems to be at maximum with no Intensity control response.

Power supply voltages seem normal so long as the Beams are positioned off
screen. Moving the beams just barely on the edge of screen to see the trace
indicates vertical and time base appear to be working.

Moving the Beams on screen momentarily results in the fan slowing down and
the 17 volt rail dropping (excessive CRT beam current?).

Excessive beam current should cause the power supply to reset instead
of just affecting the 17 volt output.

On the A23 Board TP2445 Beam 1 - Beam Intensity varies voltage from CCW 126
to CW 64 and at TP 2472 Beam 2 Intensity varies the voltage from CCW 127 to
CW 17. This suggests the Intensity control circuit is working.

Those amplifier outputs control the focus and not the intensity.

TP1186 and TP2086 shown on schematic 14 are the z-axis outputs which
control intensity.

Anyone have any suggestions as to where to go from here?

Board A23 seems virtually impossible to access - anyone know how to get to
it to replace components?

another 221 with fault transomer, Resin aging has broken the core

Miguel Work
 

Hi

Is the second 221 that I bought with the same fault transformer, this time I
managed to remove the resin and change only the core. Resin aging has broken
the core. The first time I made a new transformer, If any has the same
problem I know the turns to make a new one.



http://imageshack.com/a/img923/7690/jIf9eN.jpg



http://imageshack.com/a/img921/792/GFvFO0.jpg



http://imageshack.com/a/img921/662/3wAEJ7.jpg



http://imageshack.com/a/img922/7984/GNl5zb.jpg



Regards

Re: Help to find CRT part number

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

There is a CRT/instrument database here http://www.reprise.com/host/tektronix/reference/crt.asp

The 7854 takes a 154-0644-05 CRT. The only bits that can be seen are 154-64

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: 23 February 2016 18:40
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Help to find CRT part number

Hi, Thank you for the help.
Unfortunately I have no access to the part, so these are the pictures the guy have and are
available
for now.
I will try to convince him to take one close up of the label, but I don't know if he will do it.








------------------------------------
Posted by: @rodd
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


New file uploaded to TekScopes

TekScopes@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the TekScopes
group.


File : /Unknown CRT/CRT4.jpg
Uploaded by : rogerio414 <@rodd>
Description : now I can read 154-064....


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/files/Unknown%20CRT/CRT4.jpg


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


rogerio414 <@rodd>

Re: Help to find CRT part number

 

I don't know if he will do it.
If he doesn't, he doesn't want to disclose what he's selling. Unless you like to pay a few $$ for a nice looking (?) unknown crt, stay away from it then.

Raymond

Re: Help to find CRT part number

 

Hi, Thank you for the help.
Unfortunately I have no access to the part, so these are the pictures the guy have and are available for now.
I will try to convince him to take one close up of the label, but I don't know if he will do it.

Re: Tektronix 585

Albert Otten
 

Hi Antoine,

I missed your message from a week ago, so it's nice that Matt took over. May I add: remove *both* wires from the power transformer terminals and keep these well insulated.
Some 3 or 4 of my old tube scopes had such a leaking heater winding. A dedicated replacement transformer is fine, but ideally it should have low capacitance between primary and secondary winding. Otherwise you may get 50 or 60 Hz intensity ripple on the trace (I reported this for a 564 long ago). Check that the AC heater voltage with a new transformer is not too high, you can't rely on a transformer spec.

Albert


---In TekScopes@..., <matt8@...> wrote :

pleas remove CRT-heater wire to main transformer and let it running and looking , if it is1,35kV .
Then, transformer is not good, but not dead. a blue potting transformer is a good solution for CRT heater winding problem.

best regards
matt

Re: Applications for 012-0841--00 and 012-0842-00 Cables?

James Brines
 

http://w140.com/tek_134_1971_cat.pdf http://w140.com/tek_134_1971_cat.pdf


The bottom paragraph of the first column has a matching part number. If its the same item as is listed on the PDF it is probably for a P6021 AC Current Probe.

Re: Tektronix 585

mattko87
 

pleas remove CRT-heater wire to main transformer and let it running and looking , if it is1,35kV .
Then, transformer is not good, but not dead. a blue potting transformer is a good solution for CRT heater winding problem.

best regards
matt

Re: Packing a scope for shipping

Richard Solomon <dickw1ksz@...>
 

Tektronix shipped scopes that arrived
with no damage. What did they do ??

Also, some local UPS Stores will do
foam-in-place packing.

73, Dick, W1KSZ

On Tue, Feb 23, 2016 at 9:24 AM, jerry massengale @jmassen418
[TekScopes] <TekScopes@...> wrote:



Hi,

There is no really safe way to do it. I once send a 7704a scope covered
with over 2 inches of bubble rap in a box reinforced with extra cardboard
panels, The box arrived in perfect condition with no damaged corners. The
scope had extensive sheet metal damage. The buyer could not believe it. You
can get many pack and ship houses to pack it for you if you can afford it.
I have no idea how successful that might be. Double boxing is recommended
for domestic. A must for overseas. Have everything packed tight enough that
shaking the box will not rattle it. I have had good and bad results with
USPS,UPS, and FEDEX. If you have room to do it, save received packing
materials.

Jerry Massengale

-----Original Message-----
From: tggzzz@... [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@...>
Sent: Tue, Feb 23, 2016 9:57 am
Subject: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm
not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am
interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people
regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The
only recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand bench
PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new polyester
bed pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional
circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely
curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if I
ever want to reclaim storage space.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Packing a scope for shipping

Dave Daniel
 

The trick is to pack the instrument so that the packing is compliant
enough so that it cushions the instrument without letting the instrument
punch through the packing material and also dampening the shock from an
impact so that the instrument does not suffer high acceleration when it
is dropped or whacked sideways on the shipper's conveyer belt. To this
end, the only way to pack a large, heavy instrument that will survive
rough handling is as follows:

First of all, if practical, double-box.

Use closed-cell foam. This is often used for packing large objects and I
always save it when I receive a package that uses it. I also keep an eye
out for boxes that have been discarded with the foam still inside and
nab the foam when I can. Here is a link to a visual example :

http://tinyurl.com/zryzlhf

It is expensive to buy new, but can be reused. Like I wrote, the best
thing is to keep an eye out for it when people throw away boxes with the
foam still inside and grab the foam.

If the instrument is a box without protrusions, one can line the (inner)
box with this kind of foam on all six sides (two to four thick inches
depending on the weight of the instrument) and then either ship that or
package that box in a larger box. In the latter case, I have found that
a few inches of bubble wrap seems to be sufficient between the boxes.
Never, ever use peanuts or newspaper or expanded packing paper when
shipping a heavy object. They don't work. Period. The instrument will
work it's way through those types of material into a corner of the
package, and then if the instrument is dropped on that corner it will be
damaged.

If the instrument has protrusions, one needs to make corner blocks s for
the instrument that look like this:

http://tinyurl.com/jq5yodt

only using much thicker foam. This works well for portable 'scopes that
have carrying handles. It also works well as a means to protect the
front panel of the instrument.

In either case, you want to make sure that the instrument is not able to
move in the (inner) box - the foam should hold it securely in position
in the center of the box.

I always first wrap the instrument in a plastic bag that is taped shut
with a tab on the end of each piece of tape so that the tape may be
removed easily just by pulling the tab. This helps in cases where the
package is exposed to light moisture while it is en route.

DaveD
**
***

*

On 2/23/2016 8:57 AM, tggzzz@... [TekScopes] wrote:

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it?
I'm not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I
am interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do
people regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and
techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items.
The only recent experience I've had was when I received three
second-hand bench PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was
several new polyester bed pillows, which have since been useful in
more conventional circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm
merely curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite
future, if I ever want to reclaim storage space.








Re: Packing a scope for shipping

Dave Seiter
 

While I haven't shipped a scope in a few years, I've always double boxed, whether domestic or international, and never had any damage beyond cables coming loose.  I also preferred foam planking, and usually design the outer box to be somewhat sacrificial if the shipment is dropped.  That said, the box can get rather large, and therefore $$$.
-Dave From: "Neganur neganur@... [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes@...
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 8:36 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

  I have good experience with scavenged styrofoam frames (10-20cm thick), the kind that monitors are being shipped in. Unless the item is very heavy (30kg+) this is usually sufficient as long as you make sure there is at least 10cm of it on all sides. Use a sturdy double layered cardboard box and strong textile tape.

Keysight sends their 20k EUR scopes this way. They do foam bigger instruments in place though.

Chris

Sent from my cell phone

On 23.2.2016, at 18.24, jerry massengale @jmassen418 [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...> wrote:

Hi,

There is no really safe way to do it. I once send a 7704a scope covered with over 2 inches of bubble rap in a box reinforced with extra cardboard panels, The box arrived in perfect condition with no damaged corners. The scope had extensive sheet metal damage. The buyer could not believe it. You can get many pack and ship houses to pack it for you if you can afford it. I have no idea how successful that might be. Double boxing is recommended for domestic. A must for overseas. Have everything packed tight enough that shaking the box will not rattle it. I have had good and bad results with USPS,UPS, and FEDEX. If you have room to do it, save received packing materials.

Jerry Massengale

-----Original Message-----
From: tggzzz@... [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@...>
Sent: Tue, Feb 23, 2016 9:57 am
Subject: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The only recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand bench PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new polyester bed pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if I ever want to reclaim storage space.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752 -- #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px 0;padding:0 10px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp hr {border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp #yiv1342469752hd {color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px 0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp #yiv1342469752ads {margin-bottom:10px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp .yiv1342469752ad {padding:0 0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp .yiv1342469752ad p {margin:0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mkp .yiv1342469752ad a {color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-sponsor #yiv1342469752ygrp-lc {font-family:Arial;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-sponsor #yiv1342469752ygrp-lc #yiv1342469752hd {margin:10px 0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-sponsor #yiv1342469752ygrp-lc .yiv1342469752ad {margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752actions {font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752activity {background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752activity span {font-weight:700;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752activity span:first-child {text-transform:uppercase;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752activity span a {color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752activity span span {color:#ff7900;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752activity span .yiv1342469752underline {text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752attach {clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px 0;width:400px;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752attach div a {text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752attach img {border:none;padding-right:5px;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752attach label {display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752attach label a {text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 blockquote {margin:0 0 0 4px;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752bold {font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752bold a {text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 dd.yiv1342469752last p a {font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}#yiv1342469752 dd.yiv1342469752last p span {margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}#yiv1342469752 dd.yiv1342469752last p span.yiv1342469752yshortcuts {margin-right:0;}#yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752attach-table div div a {text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752attach-table {width:400px;}#yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752file-title a, #yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752file-title a:active, #yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752file-title a:hover, #yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752file-title a:visited {text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752photo-title a, #yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752photo-title a:active, #yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752photo-title a:hover, #yiv1342469752 div.yiv1342469752photo-title a:visited {text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 div#yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg #yiv1342469752ygrp-msg p a span.yiv1342469752yshortcuts {font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752green {color:#628c2a;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752MsoNormal {margin:0 0 0 0;}#yiv1342469752 o {font-size:0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752photos div {float:left;width:72px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752photos div div {border:1px solid #666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752photos div label {color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752reco-category {font-size:77%;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752reco-desc {font-size:77%;}#yiv1342469752 .yiv1342469752replbq {margin:4px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg {font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg table {font-size:inherit;font:100%;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg select, #yiv1342469752 input, #yiv1342469752 textarea {font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv1342469752 code {font:115% monospace;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg * {line-height:1.22em;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-mlmsg #yiv1342469752logo {padding-bottom:10px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-msg p a {font-family:Verdana;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-msg p#yiv1342469752attach-count span {color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-reco #yiv1342469752reco-head {color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-reco {margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-sponsor #yiv1342469752ov li a {font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-sponsor #yiv1342469752ov li {font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-sponsor #yiv1342469752ov ul {margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-text {font-family:Georgia;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-text p {margin:0 0 1em 0;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-text tt {font-size:120%;}#yiv1342469752 #yiv1342469752ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {border-right:none !important;}#yiv1342469752



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Packing a scope for shipping

n4buq
 

Discarded (or new if you want to buy it) carpet padding (the kind made from composite bits of foam) makes very good packing material. Several layers provides a sufficient amount of shock absorbing ability for almost anything test equipment related. Used is pretty much free. It is a bit heavy, though; however, it's a small price to pay for the protection it gives.

Supposedly, while expensive, bubblewrap is one of the better padding materials though it must be layered thickly enough.

Regards,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Neganur neganur@... [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes@...
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2016 10:36:26 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

I have good experience with scavenged styrofoam frames (10-20cm thick), the
kind that monitors are being shipped in. Unless the item is very heavy
(30kg+) this is usually sufficient as long as you make sure there is at
least 10cm of it on all sides. Use a sturdy double layered cardboard box and
strong textile tape.

Keysight sends their 20k EUR scopes this way. They do foam bigger instruments
in place though.

Chris

Sent from my cell phone

On 23.2.2016, at 18.24, jerry massengale @jmassen418 [TekScopes]
<TekScopes@...> wrote:

Hi,

There is no really safe way to do it. I once send a 7704a scope covered
with over 2 inches of bubble rap in a box reinforced with extra cardboard
panels, The box arrived in perfect condition with no damaged corners. The
scope had extensive sheet metal damage. The buyer could not believe it.
You can get many pack and ship houses to pack it for you if you can afford
it. I have no idea how successful that might be. Double boxing is
recommended for domestic. A must for overseas. Have everything packed
tight enough that shaking the box will not rattle it. I have had good and
bad results with USPS,UPS, and FEDEX. If you have room to do it, save
received packing materials.

Jerry Massengale

-----Original Message-----
From: tggzzz@... [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@...>
Sent: Tue, Feb 23, 2016 9:57 am
Subject: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm
not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am
interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people
regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and
techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The
only recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand
bench PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new
polyester bed pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional
circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely
curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if
I ever want to reclaim storage space.








Tek 176 high current fixture - need schematic

Ed Breya
 

I can't seem to find any info on the 176 other than the operating manual. I don't have or want a 176 - just need to see how they handled the readout interface to the 576.

Ed

Re: Packing a scope for shipping

Neganur <neganur@...>
 

I have good experience with scavenged styrofoam frames (10-20cm thick), the kind that monitors are being shipped in. Unless the item is very heavy (30kg+) this is usually sufficient as long as you make sure there is at least 10cm of it on all sides. Use a sturdy double layered cardboard box and strong textile tape.

Keysight sends their 20k EUR scopes this way. They do foam bigger instruments in place though.

Chris

Sent from my cell phone

On 23.2.2016, at 18.24, jerry massengale @jmassen418 [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...> wrote:

Hi,

There is no really safe way to do it. I once send a 7704a scope covered with over 2 inches of bubble rap in a box reinforced with extra cardboard panels, The box arrived in perfect condition with no damaged corners. The scope had extensive sheet metal damage. The buyer could not believe it. You can get many pack and ship houses to pack it for you if you can afford it. I have no idea how successful that might be. Double boxing is recommended for domestic. A must for overseas. Have everything packed tight enough that shaking the box will not rattle it. I have had good and bad results with USPS,UPS, and FEDEX. If you have room to do it, save received packing materials.

Jerry Massengale

-----Original Message-----
From: tggzzz@... [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@...>
Sent: Tue, Feb 23, 2016 9:57 am
Subject: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The only recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand bench PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new polyester bed pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if I ever want to reclaim storage space.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Packing a scope for shipping

 

Hi,


There is no really safe way to do it. I once send a 7704a scope covered with over 2 inches of bubble rap in a box reinforced with extra cardboard panels, The box arrived in perfect condition with no damaged corners. The scope had extensive sheet metal damage. The buyer could not believe it. You can get many pack and ship houses to pack it for you if you can afford it. I have no idea how successful that might be. Double boxing is recommended for domestic. A must for overseas. Have everything packed tight enough that shaking the box will not rattle it. I have had good and bad results with USPS,UPS, and FEDEX. If you have room to do it, save received packing materials.


Jerry Massengale

-----Original Message-----
From: tggzzz@... [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@...>
Sent: Tue, Feb 23, 2016 9:57 am
Subject: [TekScopes] Packing a scope for shipping






When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The only recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand bench PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new polyester bed pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if I ever want to reclaim storage space.

Packing a scope for shipping

Tom Gardner
 

When people ship "portable" oscilloscopes around, how do they do it? I'm not so much interested in which shipping company to choose, but I am interested in how it needs to be protected in transit. So, what do people regard as necessary and sufficient w.r.t. packing materials and techniques?

I have absolutely zero experience with packing fragile heavy items. The only recent experience I've had was when I received three second-hand bench PSUs. Amusingly, the main outer packing material was several new polyester bed pillows, which have since been useful in more conventional circumstances :)

N.B. currently this is a _completely_ academic question for me. I'm merely curious since I might want to do it sometime in the indefinite future, if I ever want to reclaim storage space.