Date   

Re: OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

Paul Amaranth
 

One of the neat tricks a drywall guy taught me was to cut a piece of
drywall a couple inches larger than your hole on all sides. Then score
the back so the center piece will fit the hole. Crack the dryall on
the score and peel the core off the back. You'll be left with a piece
of dryall that fits the hole with paper that overlaps all around on the
front. Gook it up with compound and flatten it in with a drywall
knife. A good drywall guy can make that disappear with one try, but it
might take some sanding and a touch up pass or two for us mere mortals.

Paul

On Fri, Jan 12, 2018 at 05:06:15PM -0500, Chuck Harris wrote:
Before you do something heroic, remember that nobody can see
the drywall behind your fridge. Break out a small section,
sweat solder the old fitting in a direction that makes coupling
easy, screw a new piece of drywall over the work, and you are
done.

-Chuck Harris

Ed Breya via Groups.Io wrote:
The old Sub-Zero frig recently crapped out, and despite my fixing it a number of times over twenty years, we finally decided it was time for a new one. It used to be fairly simple parts replacement or refilling, but too many big things were problematic this time. Anyway, the new one will be here in about three weeks. The dealer's guys came over today to pull the old carcass and check for the fit of the fresh one, and set up a loaner frig for the interim. It turns out that the water supply line valve box in the wall is in a bad spot, and bad orientation, so will have insufficient clearance to the back of the new frig for the water line connection. The valve outlet faces straight out, and it can't be rotated without grief (sweated to Cu tubing in wall). The new line is the braided flex type with 1/4" tube compression fittings, and if it's put on the valve directly, would get sharply kinked getting squeezed into the 1" or so clearance. I found that the same problem existed even with the original frig - it had Cu tubing all the way, and it was kinked badly right at the compression nut, but fortunately never leaked. So much for re-using the old line.




!DSPAM:5a592e0f281277836616861!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Rochester MI, USA
Aurora Group, Inc. | Security, Systems & Software
paul@... | Unix & Windows


Re: OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

Leon Robinson
 

How about soldering a short piece of tubing with a bead and nut into the elbow and go from there, Leon Robinson    K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.

From: Ed Breya via Groups.Io <edbreya=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Friday, January 12, 2018 3:29 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

The old Sub-Zero frig recently crapped out, and despite my fixing it a number of times over twenty years, we finally decided it was time for a new one. It used to be fairly simple parts replacement or refilling, but too many big things were problematic this time. Anyway, the new one will be here in about three weeks. The dealer's guys came over today to pull the old carcass and check for the fit of the fresh one, and set up a loaner frig for the interim. It turns out that the water supply line valve box in the wall is in a bad spot, and bad orientation, so will have insufficient clearance to the back of the new frig for the water line connection. The valve outlet faces straight out, and it can't be rotated without grief (sweated to Cu tubing in wall). The new line is the braided flex type with 1/4" tube compression fittings, and if it's put on the valve directly, would get sharply kinked getting squeezed into the 1" or so clearance. I found that the same problem existed even with the original frig - it had Cu tubing all the way, and it was kinked badly right at the compression nut, but fortunately never leaked. So much for re-using the old line.

So, there are a number of solutions possible, and some quite easy if I can find the right kind of feed line or fittings. The simplest would be a hose with a low-profile 90 degree connection at one end, that can go out of the valve and immediately turn parallel to the wall. Next would be a right-angle elbow with compression fits both ends, but the tricky part is it would need a special end. Adding any kind of a nipple in between the valve and the elbow would defeat the purpose. Lastly, I could  make a tube section with a very sharp pre-bend and then cut to size and bead it, to use as the elbow/adapter.

I have searched quite a bit for various fittings and hoses with 90 deg ends, but no luck so far. These are compression type brass fittings for 1/4" Cu tube, with the bead style ferrules. The problem is that most are made to take Cu tubing with the bead and nut, but I need the opposite - the elbow must have one end with these features as if it's the end of a tube. The other end can be compression or 1/8" NPT - no problem once the initial 90 deg is turned, since there's plenty of clearance for adapting downstream. I know these opposite ones exist in the type of fitting that uses the conical ferrule (I have some), but don't know about the bead type. So far. it looks like no.

So, after this long and fascinating story, does anyone know of such fittings, or adapters, or 1/4" water supply hoses with one 90 degree end (they appear to be available in the bigger sizes)? It's not an emergency, but I'd like to have a solution in-hand well before the new frig arrives.

Ed


Re: OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

Bill Riches
 

Hi Ed,

Could you forget about the existing pipe and stub a new one up through the floor outside the wall (inside the room) or cut a channel out of the wall board and run a new stub inside the wall through the floor and stick a valve on it and connect fridge to the valve with a long flex hose. Good luck!

73,

Bill, WA2DVU
Cape May

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Ed Breya via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, January 12, 2018 4:30 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

The old Sub-Zero frig recently crapped out, and despite my fixing it a number of times over twenty years, we finally decided it was time for a new one It used to be fairly simple parts replacement or refilling, but too many big things were problematic this time. Anyway, the new one will be here in about three weeks. The dealer's guys came over today to pull the old carcass and check for the fit of the fresh one, and set up a loaner frig for the interim. It turns out that the water supply line valve box in the wall is in a bad spot, and bad orientation, so will have insufficient clearance to the back of the new frig for the water line connection. The valve outlet faces straight out, and it can't be rotated without grief (sweated to Cu tubing in wall). The new line is the braided flex type with 1/4" tube compression fittings, and if it's put on the valve directly, would get sharply kinked getting squeezed into the 1" or so clearance. I found that the same problem existed even with the original frig - it had Cu tubing all the way, and it was kinked badly right at the compression nut, but fortunately never leaked. So much for re-using the old line.

So, there are a number of solutions possible, and some quite easy if I can find the right kind of feed line or fittings. The simplest would be a hose with a low-profile 90 degree connection at one end, that can go out of the valve and immediately turn parallel to the wall. Next would be a right-angle elbow with compression fits both ends, but the tricky part is it would need a special end. Adding any kind of a nipple in between the valve and the elbow would defeat the purpose. Lastly, I could make a tube section with a very sharp pre-bend and then cut to size and bead it, to use as the elbow/adapter.

I have searched quite a bit for various fittings and hoses with 90 deg ends, but no luck so far. These are compression type brass fittings for 1/4" Cu tube, with the bead style ferrules. The problem is that most are made to take Cu tubing with the bead and nut, but I need the opposite - the elbow must have one end with these features as if it's the end of a tube. The other end can be compression or 1/8" NPT - no problem once the initial 90 deg is turned, since there's plenty of clearance for adapting downstream. I know these opposite ones exist in the type of fitting that uses the conical ferrule (I have some), but don't know about the bead type. So far. it looks like no.

So, after this long and fascinating story, does anyone know of such fittings, or adapters, or 1/4" water supply hoses with one 90 degree end (they appear to be available in the bigger sizes)? It's not an emergency, but I'd like to have a solution in-hand well before the new frig arrives.

Ed


Re: OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

Chuck Harris
 

Before you do something heroic, remember that nobody can see
the drywall behind your fridge. Break out a small section,
sweat solder the old fitting in a direction that makes coupling
easy, screw a new piece of drywall over the work, and you are
done.

-Chuck Harris

Ed Breya via Groups.Io wrote:

The old Sub-Zero frig recently crapped out, and despite my fixing it a number of times over twenty years, we finally decided it was time for a new one. It used to be fairly simple parts replacement or refilling, but too many big things were problematic this time. Anyway, the new one will be here in about three weeks. The dealer's guys came over today to pull the old carcass and check for the fit of the fresh one, and set up a loaner frig for the interim. It turns out that the water supply line valve box in the wall is in a bad spot, and bad orientation, so will have insufficient clearance to the back of the new frig for the water line connection. The valve outlet faces straight out, and it can't be rotated without grief (sweated to Cu tubing in wall). The new line is the braided flex type with 1/4" tube compression fittings, and if it's put on the valve directly, would get sharply kinked getting squeezed into the 1" or so clearance. I found that the same problem existed even with the original frig - it had Cu tubing all the way, and it was kinked badly right at the compression nut, but fortunately never leaked. So much for re-using the old line.


Re: OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

John Griessen
 

On 01/12/2018 03:29 PM, Ed Breya via Groups.Io wrote:
Lastly, I could make a tube section with a very sharp pre-bend and then cut to size and bead it, to use as the elbow/adapter.
That's likely to work best. To bend it you can put fine sand in first, get hot below dull red, bend tightly.

If it doesn't want to go all the way 90 deg at first try, just anneal by getting to dull red and water
quench to pop off some of the scale. Then go at it again, and when annealed you can tap on it and
smooth plier it to reshape to get your ferrule on. Remember to blow out any trace of that sand with compressed air both directions.


OT: need special water line adapter or fittings

Ed Breya
 

The old Sub-Zero frig recently crapped out, and despite my fixing it a number of times over twenty years, we finally decided it was time for a new one. It used to be fairly simple parts replacement or refilling, but too many big things were problematic this time. Anyway, the new one will be here in about three weeks. The dealer's guys came over today to pull the old carcass and check for the fit of the fresh one, and set up a loaner frig for the interim. It turns out that the water supply line valve box in the wall is in a bad spot, and bad orientation, so will have insufficient clearance to the back of the new frig for the water line connection. The valve outlet faces straight out, and it can't be rotated without grief (sweated to Cu tubing in wall). The new line is the braided flex type with 1/4" tube compression fittings, and if it's put on the valve directly, would get sharply kinked getting squeezed into the 1" or so clearance. I found that the same problem existed even with the original frig - it had Cu tubing all the way, and it was kinked badly right at the compression nut, but fortunately never leaked. So much for re-using the old line.

So, there are a number of solutions possible, and some quite easy if I can find the right kind of feed line or fittings. The simplest would be a hose with a low-profile 90 degree connection at one end, that can go out of the valve and immediately turn parallel to the wall. Next would be a right-angle elbow with compression fits both ends, but the tricky part is it would need a special end. Adding any kind of a nipple in between the valve and the elbow would defeat the purpose. Lastly, I could make a tube section with a very sharp pre-bend and then cut to size and bead it, to use as the elbow/adapter.

I have searched quite a bit for various fittings and hoses with 90 deg ends, but no luck so far. These are compression type brass fittings for 1/4" Cu tube, with the bead style ferrules. The problem is that most are made to take Cu tubing with the bead and nut, but I need the opposite - the elbow must have one end with these features as if it's the end of a tube. The other end can be compression or 1/8" NPT - no problem once the initial 90 deg is turned, since there's plenty of clearance for adapting downstream. I know these opposite ones exist in the type of fitting that uses the conical ferrule (I have some), but don't know about the bead type. So far. it looks like no.

So, after this long and fascinating story, does anyone know of such fittings, or adapters, or 1/4" water supply hoses with one 90 degree end (they appear to be available in the bigger sizes)? It's not an emergency, but I'd like to have a solution in-hand well before the new frig arrives.

Ed


Source for long chassis mount BNC connector

 

Does anyone know a source for the chassis mount BNC connector that was used as the Word Recognizer BNC on the back of a 2465B? It is about 1/8 inch longer than a standard chassis mount BNC. I’m sure Tektronix must have used them in other equipment. The AMP part number is 222541-1.


Re: Repairing a 466 oscilloscope

Fabio Trevisan
 

Hello Nikolai,
I own a 464, whose storage board is the same as your 466.
I have dissassembled, cleaned and lubed all the AB pots of my scope,
including this one which combos with the erase button.
To your misery though, my erase button block was working well and I never
needed to disassemble it.
But I did have to disassemble some of the other pots that, due to the fact
they're single, they're not screwed, but heat riveted.
In my case, I cut the molten rivets' heads, so releasing the other end and
allowing the "sandwich" to be opened.
Although I don't remember how the erase switch block is kept closed, I
suspect AB should have used the same strategy, so probably there are some
molten rivet head that can be cut off to allow it be opened.
The challenge after will be to put it back together, without the - now cut
- rivet heads...
In my case, I carved around the pins, enough to clear an adittional mm and
then melt the pin head again, so the block ended up closed the same way as
it originally was.

Now, talking about the way to release the storage board, I think that the
way you decided to do, by desoldering the wires from the pot and erase
button combo, taking it out, and then leaving space to slide the board
towards the front panel.
I think that Ten only too late realized that if this combo pot would be
directly solded to the board, it would be impossible to remove the board,
and only then they decided to fix this combo pot to the panel, and connect
it to the board using wires.
If you look at the board, you will notice that the pads where the wires are
soldered, were meant for the combo pot to be soldered directly onto, but
still Tek mounted sideways and connected it using wires.

Brgrds,

Fabio

On Jan 12, 2018 12:17 PM, "Nikolay Belikov" <nbelikov86@...> wrote:

For future reference, the front panel (which I called faceplate by
mistake), is indeed held by two scale factor lampholders, see photo <
https://imgur.com/GzGPXGb >. They must be slid to release the front
panel. Well, it was a PITA to unscrew the nuts that hold the attenuators to
the front subpanel (#40 on the mechanical view), but in the end turned out
to be a rewarding experience.

The reason why I wanted to remove the panel so badly is not only for the
purpose of cleaning, but mainly to remove the storage board. The procedure
for its removal is pretty simple (comparing to the other ones) in the
service manual: desolder one wire, remove several shafts and knobs, detach
a cable header, unscrew some screws, and then just pull the board to front
to detach it from the connector on the interface board. The pitfall is that
the View Time potentiometer and Erase button combo is secured to the front
plate with a long hexagonal shaft, that screws onto the potentiometer and
to a (I don't know how to call it properly) a threaded bushing on the other
side of the front plate at the same time (see photo <
https://imgur.com/AWdI7HC >). This was probably done to prevent damage to
the PCB if someone desires to erase his display too vigorously. The shaft
is just a bit too long, and even when fully screwed onto the potentiometer,
there is still not enough clearance to unplug the connector. My device is
one of the early ones, and I don't know if the issue was fixed in later
iterations. So my options were to either remove the front plate and the
subpanel to let the board move (and also clean everything), or to remove
the interface board (no, thank you), or to desolder the pins one by one (I
will probably choose this way if I'll ever have to take this board out
again).

And the reason why I had to remove this board is the mechanical failure of
the Erase pushbutton. It sticks in depressed position more often than not
and isopropanol does not help at all. I hoped to desolder the assembly and
unscrew four screws holding it together to see the internals of the button,
but this scope just decided to give me one more problem to solve. The
button's case is either glued or melted together (<
https://imgur.com/rXpNafS >) and I cannot open it with moderate prying
with a scalpel. This part was made by Allen-Bradley corp and I found it
impossible to google anything about this particular button. At least, P/N
search gives nothing, and generic queries are useless there given that how
huge was and is their catalog.

So here comes yet another question (probably I ask too many of them and
just get too annoying, comparing to how many answers I get). Did anybody
have experience with these switches and was able to open them without
destroying, or I just have to look for a replacement part or 3D-print one
myself with a modern button inside?

Thank you,
Nik




Re: Transistor Cross Reference - Now N101 transistor info

Dave Wise
 

What manufacturer? I can't remember who I got my 2N1304's from. They were made in West Germany and have a logo I haven't been able to match. And they beat the JEDEC voltage and current specs by a country mile.

Dave Wise
________________________________________
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> on behalf of Jim Reese via Groups.Io <nfeinc=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 12, 2018 9:31 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transistor Cross Reference - Now N101 transistor info

Hello to all,
The Tek Xref doc shows this as P/N GA1392, NPN Germanium, TO-5 package.
Note Germanium, not Silicon. May have some affect on operation/performance if Silicon is used. Don't know for sure.
I have plenty of 2N1308 (NPN Germanium, TO-5, 25Vceo) transistors if anybody needs some. I have them on evil-bay, but will sell them for much less than listed!

Jim

From: David Hess <@DWH>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Friday, January 12, 2018 11:07 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transistor Cross Reference

Q444 and Q454 are common base cascodes for the differential signal.
They present a fixed voltage of about -12.4 volts to the preceding
current switching diodes and the transconductance amplifier composed
of Q424 and Q434. The difference in base-emitter voltage should not
matter but the much faster 2N3904s may produce a slightly different
transient response or even better performance.

Q583 is operating as an emitter follower and again I doubt if the
slightly higher base-emitter voltage will matter because the sync
pulses look to be much higher than that.

I was more worried that the maximum collector to emitter voltage of
the 2N3904 would be exceeded but all of the circuits operate at low
voltage as far as these transistors are concerned.

On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 17:13:35 -0800, you wrote:

Dave: The N101 is used in the 3A74 Plug-In (a four-trace plug-in good to 2
MHz) They are transistors Q444, Q454, Q583 Position Range and Sync In. I
have attached the schematic for your use.

Gary


Re: Transistor Cross Reference - Now N101 transistor info

Jim Reese
 

Hello to all,
The Tek Xref doc shows this as P/N GA1392, NPN Germanium, TO-5 package.
Note Germanium, not Silicon.  May have some affect on operation/performance if Silicon is used. Don't know for sure.
I have plenty of 2N1308 (NPN Germanium, TO-5, 25Vceo) transistors if anybody needs some. I have them on evil-bay, but will sell them for much less than listed!

Jim

From: David Hess <@DWH>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Friday, January 12, 2018 11:07 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transistor Cross Reference

Q444 and Q454 are common base cascodes for the differential signal.
They present a fixed voltage of about -12.4 volts to the preceding
current switching diodes and the transconductance amplifier composed
of Q424 and Q434.  The difference in base-emitter voltage should not
matter but the much faster 2N3904s may produce a slightly different
transient response or even better performance.

Q583 is operating as an emitter follower and again I doubt if the
slightly higher base-emitter voltage will matter because the sync
pulses look to be much higher than that.

I was more worried that the maximum collector to emitter voltage of
the 2N3904 would be exceeded but all of the circuits operate at low
voltage as far as these transistors are concerned.

On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 17:13:35 -0800, you wrote:

Dave: The N101 is used in the 3A74 Plug-In (a four-trace plug-in good to 2
MHz)  They are transistors Q444, Q454, Q583 Position Range and Sync In.  I
have attached the schematic for your use.

Gary


Re: 577 connectors in service manual

 

On Thu, 11 Jan 2018 11:23:13 -0500, you wrote:

Your friend had something else going on other than
simply stress. Cigars wouldn't have done anything
for her, other than add poor health, brown teeth,
and bad breath to her severe depression problem.
Tobacco does have useful medicinal qualities. For instance it is a
very effective treatment for IBS.

It always amazes me when I see a smoker trying to hide
the evidence of their smoking by waving their hand
through the air. I've got a news flash: Non smokers
can smell your smoke a city block away. We can smell
your tobacco induced body odor when you walk into the
room.
I can smell it on my own clothes even days after walking through a
room or even cloud of tobacco smoke which is annoying if it gets on
something I would not normally wash like my leather jacket.

When I ordered parts from Q-Service in Greece, the padded envelope and
its inside smelled strongly of tobacco. It reminded me of my
grandfather.

And, there is simply no hiding tobacco's affects from
the scopes and other test equipment on your bench.
The brown stain of tar and niccotine is all over
every part. The ash is ubiquitous.
It leaves a residue on every surface but at least it is easy to clean
with detergent and water. It makes a horrible mess though where
forced air circulation is used.


Re: Transistor Cross Reference

 

Oh, and the schematic did not come through. I think the forum strips
and ignores attachments.

I must have studied the 3A74 in the past as I have a scan of the
manual in my notes.

On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 17:13:35 -0800, you wrote:

Dave: The N101 is used in the 3A74 Plug-In (a four-trace plug-in good to 2
MHz) They are transistors Q444, Q454, Q583 Position Range and Sync In. I
have attached the schematic for your use.

Gary


Re: Transistor Cross Reference

 

Q444 and Q454 are common base cascodes for the differential signal.
They present a fixed voltage of about -12.4 volts to the preceding
current switching diodes and the transconductance amplifier composed
of Q424 and Q434. The difference in base-emitter voltage should not
matter but the much faster 2N3904s may produce a slightly different
transient response or even better performance.

Q583 is operating as an emitter follower and again I doubt if the
slightly higher base-emitter voltage will matter because the sync
pulses look to be much higher than that.

I was more worried that the maximum collector to emitter voltage of
the 2N3904 would be exceeded but all of the circuits operate at low
voltage as far as these transistors are concerned.

On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 17:13:35 -0800, you wrote:

Dave: The N101 is used in the 3A74 Plug-In (a four-trace plug-in good to 2
MHz) They are transistors Q444, Q454, Q583 Position Range and Sync In. I
have attached the schematic for your use.

Gary


Large qty of Tektronix (and HP) manuals, TekScope, Service Scope, etc - UK Ebay

toby@...
 

Hi

A friend pointed this seller out to me.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/ultractmri?_trksid=p2047675.l2559

A huge library for sale, might be worth rifling through if you're
looking for specific manuals.

--Toby


Re: Repairing a 466 oscilloscope

Nikolay Belikov
 

For future reference, the front panel (which I called faceplate by mistake), is indeed held by two scale factor lampholders, see photo < https://imgur.com/GzGPXGb >. They must be slid to release the front panel. Well, it was a PITA to unscrew the nuts that hold the attenuators to the front subpanel (#40 on the mechanical view), but in the end turned out to be a rewarding experience.

The reason why I wanted to remove the panel so badly is not only for the purpose of cleaning, but mainly to remove the storage board. The procedure for its removal is pretty simple (comparing to the other ones) in the service manual: desolder one wire, remove several shafts and knobs, detach a cable header, unscrew some screws, and then just pull the board to front to detach it from the connector on the interface board. The pitfall is that the View Time potentiometer and Erase button combo is secured to the front plate with a long hexagonal shaft, that screws onto the potentiometer and to a (I don't know how to call it properly) a threaded bushing on the other side of the front plate at the same time (see photo < https://imgur.com/AWdI7HC >). This was probably done to prevent damage to the PCB if someone desires to erase his display too vigorously. The shaft is just a bit too long, and even when fully screwed onto the potentiometer, there is still not enough clearance to unplug the connector. My device is one of the early ones, and I don't know if the issue was fixed in later iterations. So my options were to either remove the front plate and the subpanel to let the board move (and also clean everything), or to remove the interface board (no, thank you), or to desolder the pins one by one (I will probably choose this way if I'll ever have to take this board out again).

And the reason why I had to remove this board is the mechanical failure of the Erase pushbutton. It sticks in depressed position more often than not and isopropanol does not help at all. I hoped to desolder the assembly and unscrew four screws holding it together to see the internals of the button, but this scope just decided to give me one more problem to solve. The button's case is either glued or melted together (< https://imgur.com/rXpNafS >) and I cannot open it with moderate prying with a scalpel. This part was made by Allen-Bradley corp and I found it impossible to google anything about this particular button. At least, P/N search gives nothing, and generic queries are useless there given that how huge was and is their catalog.

So here comes yet another question (probably I ask too many of them and just get too annoying, comparing to how many answers I get). Did anybody have experience with these switches and was able to open them without destroying, or I just have to look for a replacement part or 3D-print one myself with a modern button inside?

Thank you,
Nik


Re: Smoking - Was: 577 connectors in service manual

Tam Hanna
 

Hello,
thank you all so much for your totally unselfish concern for my health, which is much appreciated but will still be ignored.

As for Depression: I once talked one of my cadets out of capping her snout...and suggested her to start smoking. And she is still at it, now in beautyful Macao, happily smoking away her (overpriced) Davidoffs.

As for Kopi Luwak: dont remind me. Yikes...

But, my dear Stephan, may I ask what makes you so confident that all the TMI will end up in your handy? I am pretty sure that there will be an auction of sorts :).
---
With best regards
Tam HANNA (emailing on a BlackBerry PRIV)

Enjoy electronics? Join 6500 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/


Re: TM500 plugin side cover retaining latch 105-0869-00.

Edward Oscarson <scskits@...>
 

Dave:
Attached 3 pics of the latches I have and 4 more of the pull tabs...
ed

On Thursday, January 11, 2018 8:41 PM, Dave Casey <polara413@...> wrote:


I think that's what we're all talking about. You may have been confused by
Siggi's shapeways link for a bracket he drew to replace a different piece
of TM500 plastic.

Dave Casey

On Thu, Jan 11, 2018 at 7:18 PM, Edward Oscarson via Groups.Io <
scskits=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

No, was thinking of the 1/4 turn fasteners on the newer TM500 plug
ins.Never ad any with the cover latches like those shown.ed


    On Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:55 PM, Rick <rpbale@...> wrote:


  Edward, were you thinking of the plugin pull tabs rather than the latches?

Rick









Re: TM500 plugin side cover retaining latch 105-0869-00.

Dave Casey
 

I think that's what we're all talking about. You may have been confused by
Siggi's shapeways link for a bracket he drew to replace a different piece
of TM500 plastic.

Dave Casey

On Thu, Jan 11, 2018 at 7:18 PM, Edward Oscarson via Groups.Io <
scskits=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

No, was thinking of the 1/4 turn fasteners on the newer TM500 plug
ins.Never ad any with the cover latches like those shown.ed


On Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:55 PM, Rick <rpbale@...> wrote:


Edward, were you thinking of the plugin pull tabs rather than the latches?

Rick









Re: TM500 plugin side cover retaining latch 105-0869-00.

Edward Oscarson <scskits@...>
 

No, was thinking of the 1/4 turn fasteners on the newer TM500 plug ins.Never ad any with the cover latches like those shown.ed

On Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:55 PM, Rick <rpbale@...> wrote:


Edward, were you thinking of the plugin pull tabs rather than the latches?

Rick


Re: TM500 plugin side cover retaining latch 105-0869-00.

Rick
 

Edward, were you thinking of the plugin pull tabs rather than the latches?

Rick