Date   

Fan mounts from an old flip-flop

Trey Greer
 

After a bit of head-scratching, I came up with a decent source of rubber for repairing those old deteriorated fan mounts in 60 year old scopes.

One of my wife's old flip-flops did the trick nicely, with a near perfect match on rubber hardness. Made my day, so I thought I would share.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=28602

-- Trey


Re: Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

 

Hi Bob,
Thanks that jogged my memory.
This is described in a construction article written by Warren Collier who was the Program Supervisor for TM Marketing at Tek in 1977.

The construction article is called "TM500 Power Module Construction Note" (AX-3557).

Among other things it has a clever phase detection circuit in it that detects when the phases of the AC windings of the TM5xx Mainframes were wired incorrectly which happened because no one at Tek realized in the early years of the TM line that anyone would try to connect the AC windings in series to get as much as 100V DC from a TM mainframe.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Robert Hay
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2018 5:41 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

Dennis,

There are two related documents here:
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/067-1201-99

Bob.

On 2/22/2018 4:43 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:
There are two calibration fixtures catalogs I know about. The first
one is July 1968 and the last one I know about is 1980.



I have a 067-1201-99 TM500 plugin that does not appear in the 1980
Calibration Fixtures Catalog which is the last cal fixture catalog I
know about. It ends with Cal fixture 067-0962-xx.



Does anyone know what the 067-1201-99 does or if there is a more
recent Cal Fixtures catalog?



Dennis Tillman W7PF










--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Tek High Amplitude Pulse Generator TM500 manual needed

Ed Breya
 

Dennis, I never saw a version of this plug-in with GR-874 connectors. The one we used had SMA for the output, and the .141" charge line (which took up most of the plug-in's volume) and step attenuator built in. I don't recall the pre-trigger connector, but it was probably BNC. I also vaguely recall that I did post an image of the original diazo-blue schematic section to the group photos back then (but maybe not). I recall seeing my original recently during my large scale garage cleanup, but it quickly got buried again. I would never have thrown it out, so I know it's still around here somewhere. As far as I know, there was never a manual - only the schematic, which is self-explanatory. The original was B- or C-size, and had the entire plug-in circuit including power supplies, but I had only saved the generator part, torn off from the big one. When I eventually find it again, I can send it up, but it seems like you're really only looking for documents about an even older version.

Ed


Tek High Amplitude Pulse Generator TM500 manual needed

 

Does anyone know of a manual for the TM500 Plugin Tek made. I am referring
to the first one in the list below. To the best of my knowledge I don't
think there is a schematic for any of them..

Instead all it says on the front panel is "High Amplitude Pulse Generator".



This plugin evolved over time into at least 4 different variants. I am
looking for the schematic for the first one that came out. It is the first
one in this list. I already have the manual for the 4th one in the list but
it is not the same schematic at all.

* It first appears in the anodized aluminum front panel as the "High
Amplitude Pulse Generator". It has a GR connector on it and you can lengthen
the pulse by plugging in lengths of GR jumper cables.

* Then it appears years later in the beige plastic front panel as
the "High Amplitude Pulse Generator" but in addition to the new front panel
it has a completely newly designed PC Board and a pre-Trigger BNC connector
where the GR Connector was. There is a fixed length of 0.141" coiled up hard
line inside to set the width of the pulse at a fixed length. The PC Board is
dated 1982.

* Next it appears as the 067-1094-99 Pulse Generator which does away
with the expensive step attenuator in favor of a fixed 25V 50Ω output SMA
connector and a PreTrigger BNC. Thee PC Board in this is yet another
completely different board. It is pretty ugly because it has no silk screen.
This plugin weighs a lot because it has a fixed length of 0.25" hard line in
it which is the first time I have seen this size hardline anywhere. I have
no idea why they switched to this hard line from the smaller and lighter
hard line. It can't be to speed up the pulse edges since they still use a
BNC connector for output. This plugin has three tiny pin jacks at the
bottom.

* Finally there is the PG509. I don't have one of these so I can't
compare it to the previous 067-1094-99 above. But from the picture in the
PG509 manual it must be different again since it has two pin jacks at the
bottom of the front panel. The PC Board layout is completely different as
well.



Thanks in advance,

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-------------------------------------------------

From Ed Breya: 8:51AM, Oct 16 2010

The un-named plug-in you referred to was called a Bratz Generator - named
after Dennis Bratz, the guy who designed it. It was used inside Tek to check
fast-rise performance of scopes. They probably had these at field offices
and repair/calibration centers for internal use only, and over time disposed
of some on the surplus market. I don't think it was offered as a product
(see PG509 below). I would guess that fewer than one thousand units exist in
the world.

It was a charge-line/avalanche transistor type design built into a TM500
plug-in. The nice things about it were that it was a triggered pulser
(rather than free-running relaxation oscillator), so it could provide a
pre-trigger signal, it had a good repetition rate, and a 50 ohm step
attenuator and charge line were built-in.

I may still have one of the boards, and a schematic for it, buried in my
papers. If I run across it (eventually) I will post it. It's not much
different from designs you have probably seen. I don't remember what type of
transistor it used - probably a 2N2369A (which is what I usually use for
this type of application) - but it was a standard Tek part-numbered device,
triggered from an oscillator via a small pulse transformer, which would then
dump the charge line energy into the load. You need about 60 to 100 V on the
charge line to be in the avalanche region, but since the transistor was
driven, rather than broken down, there was some variable range available,
so, in conjunction with the step attenuator, you could set any step size.

The PG509 appears to be a commercialized version, without the step
attenuator (which probably cost more than the whole rest of the unit), and
with a fixed repetition rate.

By the way, this type of pulser signal is inherently big and fast, and is OK
with scope and probe inputs, but should not be applied to frequency domain
equipment without lots of attenuation. It can also cause RF burns if you
touch the exposed signal.

Regards,
Ed Breya


Parts kits/transistors

Brendan
 

Anyone know any good transistor kits that I can order? I just ordered a large resistor kit and a a large capacitor kit from ebay. Im just unsure of a good transistor kit that will have a good amount of useful parts. The caps and resistors were easy. I would like to build an inventory of components to have on hand.


Re: Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

Artekmedia <manuals@...>
 

wHAT BROWSER ARE YOU USING?

On 2/22/2018 9:27 PM, David C. Partridge wrote:
Hmmm "w140.com is taking too long to respond" seems to occur every time I try to connect to TekWiki these days ...

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Robert Hay
Sent: 23 February 2018 01:41
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

Dennis,

There are two related documents here:
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/067-1201-99

Bob.



--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


Re: Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

 

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Robert Hay
Sent: 23 February 2018 01:41
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

Dennis,

There are two related documents here:
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/067-1201-99

Bob.

On 2/22/2018 4:43 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:
There are two calibration fixtures catalogs I know about. The first
one is July 1968 and the last one I know about is 1980.



I have a 067-1201-99 TM500 plugin that does not appear in the 1980
Calibration Fixtures Catalog which is the last cal fixture catalog I
know about. It ends with Cal fixture 067-0962-xx.



Does anyone know what the 067-1201-99 does or if there is a more
recent Cal Fixtures catalog?



Dennis Tillman W7PF






Re: Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

 

Hmmm "w140.com is taking too long to respond" seems to occur every time I try to connect to TekWiki these days ...

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Robert Hay
Sent: 23 February 2018 01:41
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

Dennis,

There are two related documents here:
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/067-1201-99

Bob.


Re: Opto Coupler Help?

David Berlind
 

Created my 9-volt test rig (the 1K resistor is inside the shrink tubing).

https://photos.app.goo.gl/bGgU9k9ATKqp7W2h1

It is quite remarkable to watch the resistance of a photocell go from high
to low resistance just by energizing the LED. I'll post a video of that.
But I'm still not sure what to make of the results across all 5 OCs. One
thing I did figure out: The switch actually works.


Re: Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

bobh@joba.com
 

Dennis,

There are two related documents here: http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/067-1201-99

Bob.

On 2/22/2018 4:43 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:
There are two calibration fixtures catalogs I know about. The first one is
July 1968 and the last one I know about is 1980.


I have a 067-1201-99 TM500 plugin that does not appear in the 1980
Calibration Fixtures Catalog which is the last cal fixture catalog I know
about. It ends with Cal fixture 067-0962-xx.


Does anyone know what the 067-1201-99 does or if there is a more recent Cal
Fixtures catalog?


Dennis Tillman W7PF




Re: To Recap -or- Not to Recap

Harvey White
 

On Thu, 22 Feb 2018 15:09:56 -0800, you wrote:

Hello the Tek forum,

Well, in the past, I just considered repair. Now, when I have restored a 30'3s vintage radio then recapping was the way to go. My scopes have been idle for years. On two 7603 scopes I repaired.

Yet I am reading here of some recapping the whole scope! That is a lot of work. So my question, where is the break even point?
What do you choose to do, at what year of production do you change your mind. Is this generally overkill?

I am looking at Tektronix stuff of late 70's vintage thru to the end of the 80's.
Three approaches:
1) recap everything, you get the maximum life
2) recap only what you think will fail, you get minimal effort
3) recap when something breaks.

The recap of tek digital scopes, far beyond your time range for what
you have, is likely to stop somewhere in what, 2004? 2005? Depends
on the model number too.

Harvey




Thanks, Stan



Re: To Recap -or- Not to Recap

Richard R. Pope
 

Stan,
I replaced any bulging or discolored Electrolytic capacitors and all of the Tantalum Capacitors in my Tektronix TM-5006. Another Capacitor went bad about 6 months later. It was not one that I had replaced. These machines are very difficult to get into and entails an almost complete tear down to access the capacitors. If this had been a clients machine it would not have been a good thing. Being that I am retired and it is my own machine it wasn't that big a deal. So to recap or not. This is a judgement call that I believe can only be made by the person doing the work. Of course if this is someone elses machine then that needs to be be presented to the client for his opinion.
GOD Bless and Thanks,
rich!

On 2/22/2018 5:09 PM, brasscat wrote:
Hello the Tek forum,

Well, in the past, I just considered repair. Now, when I have restored a 30'3s vintage radio then recapping was the way to go. My scopes have been idle for years. On two 7603 scopes I repaired.

Yet I am reading here of some recapping the whole scope! That is a lot of work. So my question, where is the break even point?
What do you choose to do, at what year of production do you change your mind. Is this generally overkill?

I am looking at Tektronix stuff of late 70's vintage thru to the end of the 80's.

Thanks, Stan



Re: Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

Dave Casey
 

Dennis -

There is a PDF of a 1989 catalog floating around out there. The 067-1201-xx
is not listed but is within the range of the catalog. Since it has the -99
suffix, I believe that means it was built for use in-house at Tek and thus
there may not be a version of it listed in any calibration fixture catalog.

Dave Casey

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 5:43 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

There are two calibration fixtures catalogs I know about. The first one is
July 1968 and the last one I know about is 1980.



I have a 067-1201-99 TM500 plugin that does not appear in the 1980
Calibration Fixtures Catalog which is the last cal fixture catalog I know
about. It ends with Cal fixture 067-0962-xx.



Does anyone know what the 067-1201-99 does or if there is a more recent Cal
Fixtures catalog?



Dennis Tillman W7PF







Re: To Recap -or- Not to Recap

Dale H. Cook
 

At 06:09 PM 2/22/2018, Stan wrote:

Now, when I have restored a 30'3s vintage radio then recapping was the way to go.
...
Yet I am reading here of some recapping the whole scope!
There is an immense difference between the caps used in consumer electronics of any vintage and those used in high-end instrumentation such as Tek, HP and GR. In consumer electronics price is very important so the quality of the caps used has generally been at the lower end of the price (and quality) range. Tek, HP and GR instruments were made with the highest quality parts available for performance and reliability, and price was a secondary consideration. I have Tek instruments from the '60s (and HP from the '50s and GR from the '30s) that still work fine with the original caps, and I have seldom had to replace Tek, HP or GR caps in the 40-odd years that I have been using those instruments. I would not suggest shotgunning caps in a high-end instrument. If one fails it must be replaced with one of equal quality, but high-end instrument caps seldom fail.

On the other hand I sometimes have to shotgun caps in other professional electronics (such as broadcast electronics) that is twenty years old or older. Most of that stuff wasn't built like Tek, HP or GR, and many broadcasters are notorious for spending as little on equipment as possible (buy cheap, get cheap).

Dale H. Cook, GR / HP Collector, Roanoke/Lynchburg, VA
http://plymouthcolony.net/starcity/radios/index.html


Re: To Recap -or- Not to Recap

Chuck Harris
 

You are working on a whole different class of beast
with the 7000 series scope, than you were with a
consumer grade 1930's radio.

Radios of a non military nature generally used whatever
was cheapest for parts.

7000 series scopes, generally used whatever was most
expensive for parts. Custom hybrid circuitry, tantalum
slug capacitors, metal film resistors, mylar capacitors,
gold plated circuit boards... custom wound transformers,
expense wasn't generally spared.

My philosophy with the 7000 series is to oil up the
fans, switches and the pots, clean the vertical and
horizontal plugin's ribbon switches, and enjoy.

Occasionally, they will cough up a furball in the form of
a shorted tantalum capacitor, but that usually only costs
a few bucks in parts and a little time, and if you use a
modern tantalum to replace it, it will never happen again
in your lifetime...

Anyway, that is what I do.

-Chuck Harris

brasscat wrote:

Hello the Tek forum,

Well, in the past, I just considered repair. Now, when I have restored a 30'3s vintage radio then recapping was the way to go. My scopes have been idle for years. On two 7603 scopes I repaired.

Yet I am reading here of some recapping the whole scope! That is a lot of work. So my question, where is the break even point?
What do you choose to do, at what year of production do you change your mind. Is this generally overkill?

I am looking at Tektronix stuff of late 70's vintage thru to the end of the 80's.

Thanks, Stan


Calibration Fixture Catalog after 1980

 

There are two calibration fixtures catalogs I know about. The first one is
July 1968 and the last one I know about is 1980.



I have a 067-1201-99 TM500 plugin that does not appear in the 1980
Calibration Fixtures Catalog which is the last cal fixture catalog I know
about. It ends with Cal fixture 067-0962-xx.



Does anyone know what the 067-1201-99 does or if there is a more recent Cal
Fixtures catalog?



Dennis Tillman W7PF


Re: Re-introduction to the group

Chuck Harris
 

Hi Ian,

I am not all that familiar with TEM's, but more so with
SEM's. I wish to become very much more familiar, which
is why I own one.

Some of the fondest times of my life were working (playing?)
in research labs.

In school, I was always ducking out of this or that seminar,
event, or party, to go commune, well into the wee hours of
the morning, in my lab... with all my vacuum pumps, lasers,
high voltage supplies... scope fans...

I expect that our resident TEM owners will chime in
sooner or later.

Do you qualify for the club? I don't know. I would say
that if, after all of the hours you spent staring at
the glowing phosphor flap, listening to the dibble-dabble
of the roughing pumps, and smelling all of the characteristic
odors of the TEM, you can still think of it fondly, then
you definitely belong in the club!

Every time I smell hot pump oil, hot teletype oil, or eau
de warm electronics, my mind wanders off to a simpler time...

-Chuck Harris



tinkera123 wrote:

Hi Chuck,

Sounds like you are very familiar with 'modern' TEM's etc ..... :) I used and maintained a JOEL TEM 200kv in mid 1970's to study crystal structures .... no rasters, no computer imaging etc .... viewing screen was a phosphor(?) flap, which when raised, exposed a photographic glass plate to the electron beam ... preparing samples and using the 'beast' was a skill set in itself.

Hundreds of hours in an air con, darkened lab, the smell of vacuum pump oil and cleaning alcohol is still with me ...... do I qualify for the Club'? .... :)

And now I'm trying to fix a Tek scope of that era ..... :)

Cheers,
Ian


Re: To Recap -or- Not to Recap

Richard Knoppow
 

I am by no means a Tektronix expert. However, I think the period when these scopes were built was one where plastic film caps were being used in place of paper caps. I am not sure how you tell for certain from the packaging other than waxed cardboard cases are definitely paper.
Plastic film caps will still be good and will continue to be for years to come. You may have to lift and test a couple. Paper caps of that age may still be good but its iffy.
Electrolytic caps should probably be replaced although many last for surprisingly long periods. Again, nothing takes the place of testing. Ceramic and mica are probably good, although both can fail the failures are rare.
I have a fair amount of Drake Radio gear from about 1970, all the caps are either plastic, mica or ceramic except for the electrolytics. For the most part all the caps are good except all electrolytics needed to be replaced.
I also have an RCA AR88 receiver. It was made without electrolytic caps but mine had a lot of oil filled paper caps and some flat Micamold paper caps. All were bad and the oil had leaked out of the oil filled ones with the exception of the oil filled paper filter cap which is still good. This is WW-2 vintage. Also lots of ceramic and mica caps all of which are still good.

On 2/22/2018 3:09 PM, brasscat wrote:
Hello the Tek forum,
Well, in the past, I just considered repair. Now, when I have restored a 30'3s vintage radio then recapping was the way to go. My scopes have been idle for years. On two 7603 scopes I repaired.
Yet I am reading here of some recapping the whole scope! That is a lot of work. So my question, where is the break even point?
What do you choose to do, at what year of production do you change your mind. Is this generally overkill?
I am looking at Tektronix stuff of late 70's vintage thru to the end of the 80's.
Thanks, Stan
--
Richard Knoppow
dickburk@...
WB6KBL


To Recap -or- Not to Recap

brasscat
 

Hello the Tek forum,

Well, in the past, I just considered repair. Now, when I have restored a 30'3s vintage radio then recapping was the way to go. My scopes have been idle for years. On two 7603 scopes I repaired.

Yet I am reading here of some recapping the whole scope! That is a lot of work. So my question, where is the break even point?
What do you choose to do, at what year of production do you change your mind. Is this generally overkill?

I am looking at Tektronix stuff of late 70's vintage thru to the end of the 80's.

Thanks, Stan


Re: Re-introduction to the group

tinkera123
 

Hi Chuck,

Sounds like you are very familiar with 'modern' TEM's etc ..... :) I used and maintained a JOEL TEM 200kv in mid 1970's to study crystal structures .... no rasters, no computer imaging etc .... viewing screen was a phosphor(?) flap, which when raised, exposed a photographic glass plate to the electron beam ... preparing samples and using the 'beast' was a skill set in itself.

Hundreds of hours in an air con, darkened lab, the smell of vacuum pump oil and cleaning alcohol is still with me ...... do I qualify for the Club'? .... :)

And now I'm trying to fix a Tek scope of that era ..... :)

Cheers,
Ian