Date   

Re: 7623a with cracked crt. Any hope at all?

Paul Read <paulr@...>
 

Hi E,

 

I had a similar problem a few years ago, the scope arrived wrapped in card, no packing at all. Even before I opened the package I could hear the tinkle of broken glass.

 

I ended up helping to finance another mainframe by parting out the PCB, pots and knobs etc and recycling the aluminium.

The next mainframe that turned up was unused old stock.....yum !

Best of luck.

 

73  

Paul

 


Re: designspark

Don Black <donald_black@...>
 

Aww, you can't spell it properly. It's www,work.com ;)

Don Black.

On 14-Jan-13 9:54 PM, Mark Wendt wrote:
On 01/13/2013 01:42 PM, Ray wrote:
When I try to call up http://www.kicad-pcb.org, all I get is a "System
Error". Is anyone else having a similar problem?

Ray, W4BYG
Ray,

That link looks to be working this morning here at, uh, w-w-w-work.
Gawd, I hate that word. ;-)

Mark


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: designspark

Mark Wendt <mark.wendt@...>
 

On 01/13/2013 01:42 PM, Ray wrote:
When I try to call up http://www.kicad-pcb.org, all I get is a "System
Error". Is anyone else having a similar problem?

Ray, W4BYG
Ray,

That link looks to be working this morning here at, uh, w-w-w-work. Gawd, I hate that word. ;-)

Mark


Re: 7854 waveform calculator

Mark Wendt <mark.wendt@...>
 

On 01/13/2013 01:22 PM, Herbert wrote:
Hi out there ,
I am looking for a 7854 waveform calculator keyboard for a reasonable price. Hoping, that someone has and wants to sell ?!

Herbert

Herbert,

Ebay has three or four of them up right now. This is the cheapest one at US$109.99: 120958149830

Mark


Re: Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

Gala Dragos
 

When I did this I managed to remove almost all vias from the pcb, just replaced them with thick wire. Also, the new capacitors may not mate with the old holes, so a little improvisation is necessary.
 


From: Don Black
To: TekScopes@...
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2013 7:55 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

 
Does anyone know how Tektronix would remove it?

Don Black.

On 14-Jan-13 8:16 AM, David wrote:
 
My 42 watt temperature controlled iron with its largest but short 1/4
inch screwdriver tip was barely adequate when I last did this and I
separated one of the pads from the board. Since then, I bought a 100
watt temperature controlled iron with a 3/8 inch tip but have not yet
had a chance to try it for can capacitor removal.

Just to be clear, a higher power iron is not needed for higher
temperatures but instead for higher heating capability. The lower the
temperature you can use the better.




Re: Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

Don Black <donald_black@...>
 

Does anyone know how Tektronix would remove it?

Don Black.

On 14-Jan-13 8:16 AM, David wrote:
 

My 42 watt temperature controlled iron with its largest but short 1/4
inch screwdriver tip was barely adequate when I last did this and I
separated one of the pads from the board. Since then, I bought a 100
watt temperature controlled iron with a 3/8 inch tip but have not yet
had a chance to try it for can capacitor removal.

Just to be clear, a higher power iron is not needed for higher
temperatures but instead for higher heating capability. The lower the
temperature you can use the better.



Re: 7844 - are 8 traces possible?

Rob <rgwood@...>
 

Concerning my earlier post on this subject. Please see the following link.
Clicking on it will download a PDF file of approximately 4Meg. The file is
the instruction manual for the 7A42.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/37757545/tektronix_7a42_vol1_sm.pdf

Once I finally got a chance to read it, I cannot decide if my earlier post
concerning the7844 and the 7A42 was correct or not. I'll let you be the
judge. Hopefully you'll understand the jargon better than I.

In any event, hopefully helpful. As always, thanks for the bandwidth and I
hope this finds you well.
Rob


Tek 561A

Robert Simpson
 

I wonder if this is the same one that was sold about a year ago with a letter from the actual Maranz engineer?

http://sacramento.craigslist.org/ele/3543273337.html


Re: designspark

scott_dixon
 

Sadly, KiCAD is pretty poor on Macs. I just last week gave it another try with the latest Mac build I could find. I didn't try the schematic capture but I did try to do some track routing in the PCB module and found it crashed every few minutes even when doing very simple things. There seems to be little work on getting KiCAD working well on Macintoshes so I have given up on it again.
-scott

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, Don & Karen Patterson wrote:

Can anyone advise on how well kicad runs on Macintosh?

Thanks and take care,

Don


On Jan 13, 2013, at 5:01 PM, Veronica Merryfield wrote:

Try the original home… http://iut-tice.ujf-grenoble.fr/kicad/
O
n 2013-01-13, at 10:53 AM, Michael Shiloh wrote:

Yep; looks like a problem at the site.

By the way, I'm planning on using KiCad for a class I'm teaching next
week; I've tested it over the past couple of weeks and am quite happy.

I'll be happy to share my experiences and observations as my class
progresses, if there is interest.

Michael

On 01/13/2013 10:42 AM, Ray wrote:
When I try to call up http://www.kicad-pcb.org, all I get is a "System
Error". Is anyone else having a similar problem?

Ray, W4BYG


On 1/12/2013 11:51 AM, Gordon wrote:
On 12/01/2013 15:51, jerry massengale wrote:
What free stuff do most use? Sorry again.
Tried Design Spark, didn't like it. It might have improved but I found
the footprint editor primitive to say the least. I use Kicad which does
pretty much everything I want. The Kicad footprint editor isn't
fantastic but it's adequate. http://iut-tice.ujf-grenoble.fr/kicad/ and
it's free:) You probably won't find all the footprints/symbols you want
in any package but personally, despite the amount of time it takes I
prefer to do my own. You probably won't need *that* many and at least
you'll know whether they've been marked up for insertion or not and that
they're the right size. Any time I screw a board up it's almost always
down to using someone else's footprint/symbol marked up with pin names
instead of numbers.

FWIW

Gordon


------------------------------------

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Re: 7854 - more info on how it works? (minor correction)

Glydeck
 

Lyle,

Thanks for the link to this. Great article !!

George

On Jan 13, 2013, at 10:12 AM, Lyle Bickley <lbickley@bickleywest.com> wrote:

Lyle


Re: P6137 probe and 475 oscilloscope

honolulusnowwhite
 

After you've fixed whatever is wrong with the probe, you may find that it has insufficient range to work with the 475. I believe the 475 has a 20 pf input capacitance, while the P6137 has the ability to set compensation between 12 - 18 pf.

Patrick Wong AK6C

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "ukchastuck" wrote:

Does anyone know if a P6137 probe will work in a Tek 475 oscilloscope?


Re: 7844 - are 8 traces possible?

 

There is a jumper on each one of the 7xxxP plugins which you can switch so
they will work in non-programmable mainframes.

The location of the jumpers is different in each plugin but there have been
several TekScopes threads (see the archives) over the years on how to change
the jumper to get the plugin to work.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of David
Sent: Saturday, January 12, 2013 8:53 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: 7844 - are 8 traces possible?

I found the 7A16P service manual schematics a little difficult to follow but
see now that the 7854 does not connect the GPIB control lines and the GPIB
data lines are the same as the readout time slot lines so presumably the
plug-in could have readout or GPIB but not both. The 7854 GPIB connector
dead ends directly into the 7854 GPIB controller so there is no pass
through.

I guess it is just as well that I never picked up any of those programmable
plug-ins for my 7854.

On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 19:49:03 -0800, "Dennis Tillman"
<dennis@ridesoft.com> wrote:

Hi David,
This is a misconception about the 7854. The 7854 mainframe (mainframe
ONLY!) is GPIB enabled which gives you access to all the data the MF
captures from digitizing the analog output of a vertical amp and horiz
timebase. But no programming information is passed to or from the
plugins. This is one of the biggest advantages of the 7854: it can use
all the analog plugins and timebases that predate the GPIB.

Even in the case of the Programmable plugins (the ones with the letter
P as a suffix) the 7854 does not have a way to pass software commands to
them.
Although they will work in a 7854 (or any 7000 MF) the user has to
press the front panel buttons manually to change settings. In this case
the microcontrollers inside the programmable plugins are simply
scanning the front panel buttons for user input.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: David, Sent: Saturday, January 12, 2013 5:34 PM

<snip>
The 7854 passes the IEEE bus through to the plug-ins which have their
own microcontrollers.

------------------------------------

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Re: P6137 probe and 475 oscilloscope

 

In the front of the probe, there is a replaceable tip that unscrews. It contains the 9 meg resistor. You might remove it and test it with the ohm meter. Rarely, they go bad. I believe the cable can be replaced if necessary.
 
Good luck, it is a very nice probe good to 400+ MHz.
 
 
Regards,
Tom
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: ukchastuck
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 5:30 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: P6137 probe and 475 oscilloscope

 

Thanks for your help. Discovered the probe lead is broken somewhere. No wonder it wass given to me!

--- In TekScopes@..., "Tom Miller" wrote:
>
> It should work fine with the 475. Take your ohmmeter and measure from the BNC center pin to the probe pin. You should measure 9 megohms.
>
> If it is open, it may have a bad cable. The P6137 probes are usually not something one would get for free as they go for north of $100 on a good day.
>
> Best,
> Tom
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: ukchastuck
> To: TekScopes@...
> Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 11:55 AM
> Subject: [TekScopes] P6137 probe and 475 oscilloscope
>
>
>
> Does anyone know if a P6137 probe will work in a Tek 475 oscilloscope? I believe the P6137 was originally designed for the 2400 series of oscilloscopes. I've been given one of these, but it doesn't seem to pick up anything in my 475. I'm wondering whether the probe is faulty or if it just isn't compatible with the 475.
>


Re: designspark

Don & Karen Patterson <rarebear4@...>
 

Can anyone advise on how well kicad runs on Macintosh?

Thanks and take care,

Don

On Jan 13, 2013, at 5:01 PM, Veronica Merryfield wrote:

Try the original home… http://iut-tice.ujf-grenoble.fr/kicad/
O
n 2013-01-13, at 10:53 AM, Michael Shiloh <michaelshiloh1010@gmail.com> wrote:

Yep; looks like a problem at the site.

By the way, I'm planning on using KiCad for a class I'm teaching next
week; I've tested it over the past couple of weeks and am quite happy.

I'll be happy to share my experiences and observations as my class
progresses, if there is interest.

Michael

On 01/13/2013 10:42 AM, Ray wrote:
When I try to call up http://www.kicad-pcb.org, all I get is a "System
Error". Is anyone else having a similar problem?

Ray, W4BYG


On 1/12/2013 11:51 AM, Gordon wrote:
On 12/01/2013 15:51, jerry massengale wrote:
What free stuff do most use? Sorry again.
Tried Design Spark, didn't like it. It might have improved but I found
the footprint editor primitive to say the least. I use Kicad which does
pretty much everything I want. The Kicad footprint editor isn't
fantastic but it's adequate. http://iut-tice.ujf-grenoble.fr/kicad/ and
it's free:) You probably won't find all the footprints/symbols you want
in any package but personally, despite the amount of time it takes I
prefer to do my own. You probably won't need *that* many and at least
you'll know whether they've been marked up for insertion or not and that
they're the right size. Any time I screw a board up it's almost always
down to using someone else's footprint/symbol marked up with pin names
instead of numbers.

FWIW

Gordon


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: P6137 probe and 475 oscilloscope

ukchastuck
 

Thanks for your help. Discovered the probe lead is broken somewhere. No wonder it wass given to me!

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Miller" wrote:

It should work fine with the 475. Take your ohmmeter and measure from the BNC center pin to the probe pin. You should measure 9 megohms.

If it is open, it may have a bad cable. The P6137 probes are usually not something one would get for free as they go for north of $100 on a good day.

Best,
Tom


----- Original Message -----
From: ukchastuck
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 11:55 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] P6137 probe and 475 oscilloscope



Does anyone know if a P6137 probe will work in a Tek 475 oscilloscope? I believe the P6137 was originally designed for the 2400 series of oscilloscopes. I've been given one of these, but it doesn't seem to pick up anything in my 475. I'm wondering whether the probe is faulty or if it just isn't compatible with the 475.


Re: designspark

Veronica Merryfield
 

Try the original home… http://iut-tice.ujf-grenoble.fr/kicad/
O
n 2013-01-13, at 10:53 AM, Michael Shiloh <michaelshiloh1010@gmail.com> wrote:

Yep; looks like a problem at the site.

By the way, I'm planning on using KiCad for a class I'm teaching next
week; I've tested it over the past couple of weeks and am quite happy.

I'll be happy to share my experiences and observations as my class
progresses, if there is interest.

Michael

On 01/13/2013 10:42 AM, Ray wrote:
When I try to call up http://www.kicad-pcb.org, all I get is a "System
Error". Is anyone else having a similar problem?

Ray, W4BYG


On 1/12/2013 11:51 AM, Gordon wrote:
On 12/01/2013 15:51, jerry massengale wrote:
What free stuff do most use? Sorry again.
Tried Design Spark, didn't like it. It might have improved but I found
the footprint editor primitive to say the least. I use Kicad which does
pretty much everything I want. The Kicad footprint editor isn't
fantastic but it's adequate. http://iut-tice.ujf-grenoble.fr/kicad/ and
it's free:) You probably won't find all the footprints/symbols you want
in any package but personally, despite the amount of time it takes I
prefer to do my own. You probably won't need *that* many and at least
you'll know whether they've been marked up for insertion or not and that
they're the right size. Any time I screw a board up it's almost always
down to using someone else's footprint/symbol marked up with pin names
instead of numbers.

FWIW

Gordon


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



D10 in San Diego

sipespresso <sipespresso@...>
 

I have no affiliation with the seller.
http://sandiego.craigslist.org/nsd/ele/3542764706.html
-Kurt


Re: Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

 

My 42 watt temperature controlled iron with its largest but short 1/4
inch screwdriver tip was barely adequate when I last did this and I
separated one of the pads from the board. Since then, I bought a 100
watt temperature controlled iron with a 3/8 inch tip but have not yet
had a chance to try it for can capacitor removal.

Just to be clear, a higher power iron is not needed for higher
temperatures but instead for higher heating capability. The lower the
temperature you can use the better.

On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 12:50:46 -0800 (PST), Gala Dragos
<gala_dragos@yahoo.com> wrote:

well you need a very good iron, or otherwise you will lift the traces and/or the via plating.

I could barely remove them with a 30W temp controlled iron.

________________________________
From: ukchastuck <charles.tucker@ntlworld.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 7:00 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

Anyone had experience of removing the big power supply caps from a 475? They are soldered in 4 places with big hefty solder joints - 3 negative and one positive terminal. I need to replace two of the caps which have gone faulty. It looks so difficult I was thinking of cutting off the cans and leaving the bases. I could then solder some new radials onto the existing base. Any ideas out there please?


Re: Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

Gala Dragos
 

well you need a very good iron, or otherwise you will lift the traces and/or the via plating.

I could barely remove them with a 30W temp controlled iron.


From: ukchastuck
To: TekScopes@...
Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 7:00 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

 
Anyone had experience of removing the big power supply caps from a 475? They are soldered in 4 places with big hefty solder joints - 3 negative and one positive terminal. I need to replace two of the caps which have gone faulty. It looks so difficult I was thinking of cutting off the cans and leaving the bases. I could then solder some new radials onto the existing base. Any ideas out there please?




Re: Removing the Sprague power supply electrolytic capacitors from a 475

Brad Thompson <brad.thompson@...>
 

On 1/13/2013 1:54 PM, Jim wrote:
If you're brave, you can use a Dremel and cut-off wheel to do this
cutting*, and notch into the solder retaining the tabs in the holes.
<snip>

Incidentally, there's a product on the market whose name escapes me
right now that's basically a bismuth-based solder alloy that
dramatically lowers the melt temp of solder when alloyed in. Melt the
joint and dab the solder wire with flux onto the joint, and when it's
cooled, the overall melt point is dramatically lowered. This is
intended for SMT ICs -- <snip>
Hello, Jim--
Were you thinking of "Chip Quik (tm)"?

<snip>
I haven't looked for plain bismuth wire, but I know that bismuth is
ductile enough that you could make bismuth bar into bismuth wire at home
with just a smooth hammer and a hard, smooth flat surface. It'll
work-harden, but you could try annealing it in boiling water :)
Our colleagues in the U.K. refer to the process as, "Sync the bismuth"<g>

<snip>

* If you are a destructive maniac, a Sawzall with a metal-cutting blade
also works.
The only drawback involves flying metal chips and dust. If there's
sufficient clearance around the capacitor's unsoldered end, perhaps
one could use a tubing cutter to "de-cap" that end, extract the
innards and then split the can's sides with metal shears, eventually
reaching the base and cutting that into small pieces around the tabs.
73--

Brad AA1IP

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