Date   

Re: New file posted

Greyhawk <greyhawkeng@...>
 

I Would Send You Some Files, But All Your E-Mail Addresses Bounce.

Greyhawk

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Lane
To: tekscopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2004 22:49
Subject: [TekScopes] New file posted


With thanks to Fred de Vries, I've posted a ZIPfile containing EPROM images for the devices in the 7D20. They're version 81.1, F1.03.

Filename is 7d20.zip at the usual location and path.

Contributions always welcome! ;-)


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Bruce Lane, Owner & Head Hardware Heavy,
Blue Feather Technologies -- http://www.bluefeathertech.com
kyrrin (at) bluefeathertech do/t c=o=m
"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped with surreal ports?"


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Advice wanted first time servicing a scope Techronics 549

Christian <christianfletcher@...>
 

Dear Friends

I have a small collection of test equipment and recently been
donated a Techtronics 549 storage oscilloscope. The unit has had
little use but many years of storage makes me think a tune up is in
order. Can anybody please help me with service manual and operating
instruction. The display screen makes a very good alternative to a
lava lamp but not so good for storage of a waveform.

So far I have done a few essential safety test and powered up the
scope. The circuit boards have many small neon tubes on them. Are
these being used as some kind of voltage regulator I have not seen
this before ?

My knowledge of scopes really only extends to using them, any advice
for cleaning up the scope and servicing it and any known bugs with
this scope.

The unit also has the fan guard missing off the back and a broken
selector switch. Can anybody help me with spares. I have some
pictures of the scope and my other items. Please visit my site and
look at the museum and bench view pages.

Best regards Christian Fletcher. www.christianfletcher.org


Re: lethality of HV

 

In message <051a01c4034e$adc5cb90$0300a8c0@LianLi>, Robert Morein <morepub@comcast.net> writes
A friend of mine is afraid to work on a three gun projector, which coincidentally has the same anode voltage as the 7704, 7904, etc, 24 KV.
Well he should be cautious. Isn't the point here that it isn't just the static charge on the scope we are talking about but the capability of the PSU to deliver as no matter how small the energy charge that the tube will hold I'll bet you a pound to a penny that the PSU has more than enough oomph to kill you.

I don't blame him. It scares me too. To the point that I have a number of separate meters to dangle round stuff before I power it up (when it is very high volts) so I don't have to dab round any more than necessary. Paranoia I know but there's only one of me and components are easily replaced.

Robin

It is my understanding that this voltage is not lethal, primarily because the CRT is too small to store a lethal charge.

Elsewhere, I have read that the lethal threshold, at least as far as TV tubes are concerned, is around 32 inches.

Comments? Any reassuring words for my friend?






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Robin Birch


Re: Oscilloscopes 101 - eBay

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

-- whereas
one of their last new kits created, the Model IG-4244: beats out Tek's
and HP's expensive spread, while also providing a clean typ. 700 pSec Tr
into 50 ohms. Not a 284, but plenty fine for sum-squares verification
to 350 MHz.
My favourite is the Tek 111 pretrigger pulse generator. This is an
avalanche pulser, and gives a really clean 400ps rise time. Since it has an
adjustable delay between a pretrigger pulse and the main output you can kick
a timebase into action well in advance of the main event. This is OK for
testing things using a 7T11/7S11/S1 set up with 1GHz bandwidth (using sum of
squares). Or (and I haven't tried this) use the 400ps edge to trigger a
tunnel diode pulser to generate a really fast event, but with an adjustable
pretrigger.

Craig


Re: lethality of HV

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

Bet that would blow the gate on a MOSFET ;-)

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: Rex W. Athey [mailto:mister_twister@panetwork.com]
Sent: 07 March 2004 02:26
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com; Craig Sawyers
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] lethality of HV


Speaking of High Voltage - check this out....

http://www.unf.edu/~lsnedden/500Kv.mpg

and the explanation.....

http://www.wiseguysynth.com/larry/day.htm

DEFINITELY LETHAL!!!!!!!!!


4xx Portable Feet Repros Available

Howard Matthews
 

OK folks,

I think I have the process in pretty good control. I am willing to
cast some replacement feet for 453, 454, -A, 464, and I think they
also fit the 465, 475, 485 series of scopes. (These are the bottom
feet, not the rear feet!)

I cannot do a lot. I can cast and cure one set of 4 feet per day,
if I'm not distracted by something else. I'm not doing this for any
profit, just to help some of you fellow Tek junkies. And to recoup
some of my $75 investment in casting chems.

To see what the recast feet look like, please see:

http://home1.gte.net/web22rvf/Oscilloscopes_files/Tek4xxFeet.JPG

These are pretty close reproductions of Tek part 348-0080-00 or -
01. The original models are unused NOS that Stan provided. The
rubber is a little softer than the originals, and quite a bit
blacker. A quick abrasion test with 200 grit sandpaper indicates
they are about as abrasion resistant as the originals. They are
more suseptable to cuts, though. Very, very usable, but not 100%
authentic. Replace the entire set of 4 if you want to resell the
scope, due to the noticable color difference.

The deal would be - $6.00 (that is $5.00 and about $1.00 S&H) plus a
set of nuts (alloy inserts) that I can use for the next set of 4
feet. I would also consider 2 sets of the nuts plus $1.00 S&H for
one set of repros.

If anyone is interested, please contact me here first.

Good scoping,
-Howard


New file posted

Bruce Lane
 

With thanks to Fred de Vries, I've posted a ZIPfile containing EPROM images for the devices in the 7D20. They're version 81.1, F1.03.

Filename is 7d20.zip at the usual location and path.

Contributions always welcome! ;-)


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Bruce Lane, Owner & Head Hardware Heavy,
Blue Feather Technologies -- http://www.bluefeathertech.com
kyrrin (at) bluefeathertech do/t c=o=m
"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped with surreal ports?"


Re: Oscilloscopes 101 - eBay

Ashton Brown <ashton@...>
 

Have seen some unbuilt Heathkits (scopes and other pretty trivial gadgets) go for astronomical prices, though I'm not not looking often now. Ego-bid war between two will do it: $900 IIRC, and several >500.

People will also pay lots for Heath's earlier (green case) calibrator, with not very impressive specs; unuseable for fast Tr check. -- whereas one of their last new kits created, the Model IG-4244: beats out Tek's and HP's expensive spread, while also providing a clean typ. 700 pSec Tr into 50 ohms. Not a 284, but plenty fine for sum-squares verification to 350 MHz. These have occasionally shown up and slipped through the cracks - I bought a spare for my hand-assembled one for ~$50.

'Course too, *cough* one of those Warz got me ~$420 for a Tek 453! (admittedly pristine, calibrated, photographed Tr.) in about '00 or '01.

Call it Psych 101A?


{cackle}

Ashton

Tony Denning wrote:

It pays to research...must be someone new to the hobby. This is probably the highest bid I've ever seen on a older service grade EICO 460 scope (C$230!) and no guarantee it even works. Could have any number of nice Tek models for this price. Anyway, the seller must be happy...

http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dllViewItem&item=2594925082

Cheers,
Tony


Re: lethality of HV

Rex W. Athey <mister_twister@...>
 

Speaking of High Voltage - check this out....

http://www.unf.edu/~lsnedden/500Kv.mpg

and the explanation.....

http://www.wiseguysynth.com/larry/day.htm

DEFINITELY LETHAL!!!!!!!!!


Re: lethality of HV

regman10
 

Ironically it was at Siemens where I was working for when one fellow got
electrocuted. It seems he grabbed on to a 480VAC 3 phase buss while pulling
himself up from underneath a linear accelerator. Instant death.

Good point about being tired. It's best to come back another day. I have
worked for many companies that had the "2 man rule". Of course nothing
could save you from 480V 3 phase.

A little fear, like fear of God is healthy - respect a requirement.


Re: lethality of HV

Miroslav Pokorni
 

Twenty years ago, when I worked for Siemens in Munich, after hours, if there
was no one in the lab we were not allowed to work with anything electrical,
that included 5 V lab supply, soldering iron etc. We used to joke that in
such circumstances we should put a seat belt while seating in desk chair, in
case that someone falls asleep, falls out of chair and gets hurt, but we
were only our thirties, still feeling immortal.

Regards

Miroslav Pokorni

----- Original Message -----
From: "Greyhawk" <greyhawkeng@hotmail.com>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>; "Fred Olsen" <fwolsen@execpc.com>
Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2004 11:40 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] lethality of HV


I Was Working On A High Energy Strobe System On The Bench, Late At Night
26 Years Ago Using A 500v Regulated Supply, I Was Tired, And Had The Supply
Set To Max Current, And Voltage. Being Tired, I Had The Single Meter Set To
Current (Thought 0 Volts), Clipped The Ground Lead To The PCB, And Held Onto
The Ground Lead To Steady The PCB, And Grabbed The Positive Lead. At Full
Voltage, And 500 Mils For A Minute (A Lead In Each Hand), After Getting My
Thoughts To What Was Happening (Very Difficult Under The Present
Circumstances)Stood Up And Walked Backwards, And Pulled The Leads Out. The
Doctor Said I Should Have Been Dead On The Spot. I Guess The Great Spirit
Was On My Side That Night. I Hope No One Here Has To Learn The Hard Way As I
Did, Not Only Should Safety Be A Concern, But Mental Awareness, And Another
Person In The Vicinity (In Case). Also. As You Get Tired, Dangerous Mistakes
Are Made. I Still Have The Scars On Both Hands 26 Years Later As A Reminder
Of My Stupidity.

Greyhawk
----- Original Message -----
From: Fred Olsen
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2004 14:15
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] lethality of HV


Robert Morein wrote:
> A friend of mine is afraid to work on ... 24 KV.
> Comments?

War stories aside for a moment, I think the essence of the question is
"afraid". It's my non-humble opinion that his fear is born of
inexperience at that level, perhaps also a lack of proper training, and
is therefore a 'good thing'. In such situations it's quite common for
someone to make a mistake due to the distraction caused by their fear.

I would submit that if your friend has no means (or need) to acquire the
training, then the experience, which would change the fear to a rational
respect - then he has no business messing about where he shouldn't and
needs to have it done for him. He's not silly, he's not a coward; he's
being quite sensible. Certain situations don't allow for mistakes - not
even one.

I also have practiced 'one hand only' around high voltage, for something
like .......... years. (Hmmm. Where in the world did those number keys
go?) Always careful, and I still have the marks to show the effects of
an unexpected breakdown, or of waiting six months for an RF burn to
heal, or simply of a lapse in concentration.
Yes, Craig, we're old. ;<))

Fred
--
<><
--
Outgoing checked by Norton AV



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Re: lethality of HV

Brian Goldsmith <brian.goldsmith@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Greyhawk"

I Was Working On A High Energy Strobe System On The Bench, Late At Night
26 Years Ago Using A 500v Regulated Supply, -- Also. As You Get Tired,
Dangerous Mistakes Are Made. I Still Have The Scars On Both Hands 26
Years Later As A Reminder Of My Stupidity.

**** Is that why the Shift key gets depressed for each word that is
typed?

Brian Goldsmith.


Re: lethality of HV

Miroslav Pokorni
 

One of the better (and readily available) devices to painlessly dissipate
static charge is a quarter coin. I hold on the most of the surface of the
coin and touch grounded surface with exposed part of coin. That way,
discharge current gets distributed over larger skin area and I do not feel
it as a shock, as a matter of fact, do not feel it at all.

Regards

Miroslav Pokorni

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gary Allsebrook" <regman10@comcast.net>
To: "Craig Sawyers" <c.sawyers@tech-enterprise.com>;
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2004 8:44 AM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] lethality of HV


Some components like JFETS can be damaged at potentials under 100V.
MOSFET is even more sensitive, junction can take more abuse than oxide layer
at gate of transistor.


Regards

Miroslav Pokorni


Re: lethality of HV

Greyhawk <greyhawkeng@...>
 

I Was Working On A High Energy Strobe System On The Bench, Late At Night 26 Years Ago Using A 500v Regulated Supply, I Was Tired, And Had The Supply Set To Max Current, And Voltage. Being Tired, I Had The Single Meter Set To Current (Thought 0 Volts), Clipped The Ground Lead To The PCB, And Held Onto The Ground Lead To Steady The PCB, And Grabbed The Positive Lead. At Full Voltage, And 500 Mils For A Minute (A Lead In Each Hand), After Getting My Thoughts To What Was Happening (Very Difficult Under The Present Circumstances)Stood Up And Walked Backwards, And Pulled The Leads Out. The Doctor Said I Should Have Been Dead On The Spot. I Guess The Great Spirit Was On My Side That Night. I Hope No One Here Has To Learn The Hard Way As I Did, Not Only Should Safety Be A Concern, But Mental Awareness, And Another Person In The Vicinity (In Case). Also. As You Get Tired, Dangerous Mistakes Are Made. I Still Have The Scars On Both Hands 26 Years Later As A Reminder Of My Stupidity.

Greyhawk

----- Original Message -----
From: Fred Olsen
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, March 06, 2004 14:15
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] lethality of HV


Robert Morein wrote:
> A friend of mine is afraid to work on ... 24 KV.
> Comments?

War stories aside for a moment, I think the essence of the question is
"afraid". It's my non-humble opinion that his fear is born of
inexperience at that level, perhaps also a lack of proper training, and
is therefore a 'good thing'. In such situations it's quite common for
someone to make a mistake due to the distraction caused by their fear.

I would submit that if your friend has no means (or need) to acquire the
training, then the experience, which would change the fear to a rational
respect - then he has no business messing about where he shouldn't and
needs to have it done for him. He's not silly, he's not a coward; he's
being quite sensible. Certain situations don't allow for mistakes - not
even one.

I also have practiced 'one hand only' around high voltage, for something
like .......... years. (Hmmm. Where in the world did those number keys
go?) Always careful, and I still have the marks to show the effects of
an unexpected breakdown, or of waiting six months for an RF burn to
heal, or simply of a lapse in concentration.
Yes, Craig, we're old. ;<))

Fred
--
<><
--
Outgoing checked by Norton AV



Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
ADVERTISEMENT





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a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
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b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
TekScopes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


Re: lethality of HV

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

Most old
timers put one
hand in their pocket so that there is no path. You will still get an
alarming little shock but it won't be lethal.
Oh dear - maybe I now class as an old timer ;-)

I learnt respect for hight voltage in the 1970's when I built an
experimental pulsed carbon dioxide laser. This thing had an array of high
voltage ceramics totalling 20nF charged up to 20kV (4 Joules). In the dark
you could see any sharp corner glowing blue with corona discharge. Boxed
the thing up in a copper foil lined perspex box with a hefty strap to ground
to make sure that any unpleasant event went somewhere safe.

And yes - while measuring anything on this lethal beast (using a P6015) one
hand was very firmly in the pocket. I nearly gave a colleague a heart
attack with one episode - I managed to get the probe tip half way between
the top and bottom plate that sandwiched the capacitors - and it arced
across top plate-probe-bottom plate with a huge BANG. Gave me such a fright
that I yelped, and my colleague ran in with a white face expecting to find
me on the floor. It really stuffed the screw-on tip of the probe too....

Although that was bad enough, this thing spat 0.5 Joule pulses of light out
(in the infrared) with a pulse length of about 100ns - a peak power of 5MW.

Of course over the years I have had the odd lapse of concentration - like
the belt from the 7704A HT supply - but fortunately I've got away with it so
far. Might have to revisit the care I take now the years are passing.

Craig


Re: lethality of HV

regman10
 

In the Tektronix book "Biophysical Measurements" book, it states that it
only takes 10mA of current to stop the human heart if a circuit path through
it is created (like hand to hand or hand to foot). Most old timers put one
hand in their pocket so that there is no path. You will still get an
alarming little shock but it won't be lethal.

The threshold of pain is about 1 mA.

Conversely most pacemakers only generate 10 microamps to pace the heart.

Your friend is wise to be afraid. I have worked in more than one shop where
a person was electrocuted due to carelessness. One must respect high
voltage and electricity 24/7.

I also belong to a Hammond organ technical group and it never ceases to
amaze me the risks some people take. I am constantly telling people to hire
a professional technician if they are not absolutely certain of what they
are doing. Vintage tube equipment has many different lethal voltages.

You will notice that in almost every manual, even for the TM series,
warnings about lethal voltages inside.

I know that most of you are seasoned technicians - this is more directed to
newbies and persons more used to CMOS and TTL voltages in digital equipment.


Re: lethality of HV

regman10
 

More about static electricity - it takes 5kV to even have a sensation from
it, due to skin resistance, etc. That is why static damage is so easy. Some
components like JFETS can be damaged at potentials under 100V.

I use an antistatic workstation and wriststrap all the time. If you live in
a dry environment there is even more risk of static damage (or have nylon
carpets in your shop area). I even have a static locator to identify and
remove static generating materials from my "protected area". Some of the
worst offenders are packing materials. Very few people use antistatic
packing materials. Bubble wrap and styrofoam peanuts (& coffee cups) are
the worst. Even your clothing can generate dangerous levels of ESD. Stick
with natural fibers.

Static damage is rarely immediate - it creates a "walking wounded" component
that can fail a year or more out. The carbon generated from the ESD strike
can cause a transistor junction to "grow" over time, temperature and other
conditions in IC's.

Antistatic straps have a 10Mohm resistor built in for safety reasons.

In my car I use an insulated key as a lightning rod which lessens the shock
immensely.

I used to set up and train employees in medical manufacturing companies
about ESD control.


Re: lethality of HV

mwcpc7@...
 

When I was in technical school I spent many evenings and weekends repairing
50s TV sets and never had a problem keeping away from the HV.

Then I spent 20 years working on solid state electronics, mostly audio. I
got quite used to using my fingers as signal tracers.

Finally I decided to work on one of the old TV sets. I was amazed at how hard
it was to keep my fingers out of the set. I kept wanting to touch a tube
socket to see if that would effect the signal.

Perhaps the more experience one has with modern electronics, the more
dangerous it might be for them to work on an old 500 series scope!

Mike Csontos


Teknet manuals

George Headley
 

Hi guys:
If you read the info on the site there is a disclaimer that says that there may be omissions and that they are asking for information from the users to point out these problems. I believe they say that they will make sure you get a corrected copy. For a free service I don't know how much further they should go. They do have original copies for sale. Another point is that I have been to their facility and found that they are a very well qualified team of technical people. I was impressed with the people, the technical lab and the management. They are in the process of moving from the Chicago area to Atlanta. From my experience in technical management, I know that you don't relocate marginal people. They have a good inventory of equipment for sale. I may have missed the point but I was not aware that the primary business was rental.
George
Atlanta

Sign up for Internet Service under $10 dollars a month, at http://isp.BlueLight.com


eBay snip

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

Anyone interested, item 3802128271 is for "TM503 DM501 PS501-2 DM501" at $99
buy it now. The seller says sold for parts, but at least the displays are
lit, so maybe there is little wrong with it.

Craig

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