Date   

Re: ++Processor error on TDS 754D on startup

Harvey White
 

Looking at what I think is going on, it's possible that the processor was in the middle of writing to NVRAM and corrupted the process.  (it's write, and then write a checksum to validate the data).  *if* that happened, then the NVRAM should be electrically fine, but might have corrupted data.  In theory, the NVRAM itself is not likely bad, but the data could be corrupted.  A CRC is (one crude method), add all the data up to make a number, chop off part of it, then find a number that when added to what you have, makes the result zero.  Write that number into the last locations in the NVRAM.  When the processor checks it, the sum of all the data (corrected for the part you lopped off....) should be zero.  Not, and there are errors.

It's perhaps rare that this process could be interrupted, but it is possible.

Harvey

On 7/15/2021 6:22 PM, pmoyle111 via groups.io wrote:
Last winter we had a power outage where the power co would turn power on for 15 min ever hour or so. The scope was soft turned off by the front button. Since then I have been getting the error message above. I ran SPC but that didn't change anything. Looking at the log there are lots of (loosely quoting) nvRam crcc errors. I am getting a gpib interface from Prologix that someone wrote a nice interface for that I found searching this topic. I also got a copy of the nvram file.

Should I be able to fix this by writing a new file, or will the nvRams need replacing? I assume that if I don't cycle power, the SPC should not have that error after uploading new image?

This seems to be a common problem. Anyone have any comments advice?






FIXED! Shock Mount Replacement for Type D and Type H 500-series plugins (was [TekScopes] Another interesting Tektronix web site)

Dave Wise
 

FIXED!

"DJI ZH3-3D Damping Rubber Set (Part 42)", less than $10 at ebay.
This is four bags of four different isolators, for an RC helicopter camera mount, one of DJI’s “Zenmuse” series.
The ridged ones are too soft.
The ball shaped ones (two bags, gray marked "A40" and white "30")
are, as far as I can tell, *perfect* drop-in replacements.

From my repair notes:

These are 348-0007-00.
348-0087-00 plus 361-0113-00 (used in 1A6 and 1A7) might work too.

One of the three replaced way back
when is now severely crazed. Bad batch of rubber?
I tried Julian Bunn's fan mount rejuvenation procedure
(see "Another interesting Tektronix web site" at Tekscopes
at groups.io). Soak in olive oil 1/2 hour, boil in water
5 minutes. No effect, must be a different rubber.

Original part 348-0007-00 is a hollow rubber ball approx
15mm dia across equator, with a 12mm OD flange at each end.
Rubber is about 1.5mm thick. Neck OD 9mm, neck to neck 11mm.
Clearance hole for #8 screw. Chassis holes are 5/16" (8mm).

Dave Wise

From: David Wise
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 5:12 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Another interesting Tektronix web site

Maybe 275-1N or 7110-0.5 or 7110-1.0 .  The latter can be had for $8 each at https://www.shopbdproduct.com/product_p/7110-1.0.htm .

Dave Wise

From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of stevenhorii via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2021 3:52 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Another interesting Tektronix web site

All on this thread,

There are Barry mounts which come in various sizes and damping abilities:

https://novibration.com/

Scroll down the pages of this distributor’s Web site until you get to “Ball
mount series” which sounds like what you are looking for.

I have no conflict of interest with this company. I have seen Barry mounts
used quite a bit in various pieces of equipment when isolation from
vibration is important.

Steve Horii



On Mon, Jun 21, 2021 at 14:34 Dave Wise <david_wise@phoenix.com> wrote:

Thank you, Daniel, for your research and ideas.

The natural shape is a hollow ball. It must have been molded.
The screw plays no role in normal use; it limits motion extremes to keep
the cushions from tearing or coming out of the mounting holes.

I replaced all the cushions in my D and H, maybe ten years ago, with
new-old-stock I bought from Stan Griffiths. (They all have the same orange
paint stripe.) Most are fine but one is a mosaic of cracks. I’ve read
that making rubber is not 100% science. I figure there was a bad batch.

A solid ball with a hole through the middle would be too stiff unless the
rubber was exceptionally soft.

Another TekScopes member created a photo album, "541 Flip-flop fan
mounts", in which he created fan mounts from the sole of an old sandal. It
seems to me that I could combine that with your tubing idea.

- Long screw or stud, nuts, washers
- Thick-wall latex or silicone tubing, with 5/16” outside diameter (slip
fit in the mounting hole) when the screw is in
- Three foam rubber disks with 5/16” hole

- Put screw through tubing
- Thread first disk onto it
- Slide into first mounting hole
- Thread second disk onto it
- Slide through second mounting hole
- Thread third disk onto it
- Add washer and nut just snug

The foam rubber disks cushion axial motion, the tubing cushions radial
motion, and the screw holds it all together.

I will look around for an old mouse pad. Cut into disks with scissors and
hole with a paper punch. This just might work!

Dave Wise

From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Daniel Koller via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 5:42 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Another interesting Tektronix web site

Hi all,
I took a look at my D. My shock mounts are not gray - they are black.
They are just so oxidized on the surface they look grey, but they darkened
up with rubbing.
They have the consistency of latex surgical tubing, which makes me
wonder if A) that is what they are made of, and B) maybe that is what they
can be made of. I think if allowed to expand fully, they would be closer
to "I" shaped - a tube with flanges on the ends, rather than "ball
shaped". They take on the ball shape because they are compressed in their
mounts. You might be able to approximate them with surgical tubing. I
don't know if latex can be formed like thermoplastics, but if so, you could
try heating a section of tubing and blowing into it to bulge it out.
Donno. But making a flange would be hard. That might have to be molded.
Regarding molding hollow things - maybe mold the solid part, then
freeze it and drill out the center in a drill press? Keep it frozen in the
mold until drilled. Might be able to cast it in RTV that way. But the
resulting part will still be stiffer, in my opinion, than the original,
just based on poking at the ones I have on the chassis.
Another possible option is to 3D print. I have been playing with a very
soft thermoplastic polyeurethane (TPU) in my 3D printer. One needs a
special extruder with very little clearance between the extruder gears and
the feed tube, OR a direct extruder that goes right into the print head, in
order to be able to "push" the plastic through. But it does work, and I
have successfully printed lens caps and gaskets. I have not yet tried
stand-offs and vibration mounts, but I do plan on printing a door bumper
for a car, which has some of the features of the D's mounts. In the end,
the consistency will be a bit stiffer than RTV I think. There is
"Ninjaflex" TPU available, which is even softer, but I have not tried it
yet.
Ok, and lookie here:
https://www.plasticballsupply.com/1-2-in-0-5-black-buna-rubber-resin-balls/?utm_campaign=shopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&gclid=CjwKCAjwzruGBhBAEiwAUqMR8HA-hPxNS7QI8J9bTUim39oKHQD8fSUIEJESdlbOjltfInNCf-jM_xoCt7EQAvD_BwE
<
https://www.plasticballsupply.com/1-2-in-0-5-black-buna-rubber-resin-balls/?utm_campaign=shopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&gclid=CjwKCAjwzruGBhBAEiwAUqMR8HA-hPxNS7QI8J9bTUim39oKHQD8fSUIEJESdlbOjltfInNCf-jM_xoCt7EQAvD_BwE
Rubber balls. You still need to put a hole through them. The
dermatologist can provide the answer. Just go have a mole removed and ask
them for the hole-punching razor tool they use to circumscribe the mole.
I saved one or two and they are about 3 and 5 mm in diameter or so, with
various sizes available. This is cheap if insurance pays for the
service. Otherwise, you can get biopsy punches on amazon.


https://www.amazon.com/Biopsy-Punch-Sterile-Stainless-Steel/dp/B07R25NHBR/ref=pb_allspark_dp_session_sims_pao_desktop_5/141-2449543-9055469?pd_rd_w=4kBMY&pf_rd_p=3ac2ce50-9d75-4bd3-868d-72b252a0623c&pf_rd_r=1B8PSTPQSFTG3WBK8GEW&pd_rd_r=59842b2f-725a-4e66-90d4-d34a3844db5d&pd_rd_wg=wZjGh&pd_rd_i=B07R25NHBR&psc=1
<
https://www.amazon.com/Biopsy-Punch-Sterile-Stainless-Steel/dp/B07R25NHBR/ref=pb_allspark_dp_session_sims_pao_desktop_5/141-2449543-9055469?pd_rd_w=4kBMY&pf_rd_p=3ac2ce50-9d75-4bd3-868d-72b252a0623c&pf_rd_r=1B8PSTPQSFTG3WBK8GEW&pd_rd_r=59842b2f-725a-4e66-90d4-d34a3844db5d&pd_rd_wg=wZjGh&pd_rd_i=B07R25NHBR&psc=1
I think careful use of one of those punches can put a neat hole through
a rubber ball, and rubber washers seem to be available in plenty of sizes
on the interwebs! Good luck.
I'd be curious to know how you replace these. My 503 has latex
isolation mounts in parts of the circuitry. I'm betting they are getting
pretty dried up.
Dan

On Sunday, June 20, 2021, 04:16:31 PM EDT, teamlarryohio <
larrys@teamlarry.com> wrote:

Been far too long, but the ones I used were the same type generally as the
fan mounts. Otoh, McMaster has a huge variety of hardware bits.
G'luck!
-ls-














Re: Members in Germany, Brussels, and the Netherlands affected by the floods

Heinz-Peter Deutsch
 

Dennis,
in the affected regions is no power, no internet, no water, no food.

So it will take some time to reach the people.

Peter
==============

On 15.07.2021 23:35, Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:
If you are in the region affected by the flooding in Germany, Brussels, or
The Netherlands pleased contact me (dennis at ridesoft dot com) if there is
anything I can do or TekScopes can do to help.
Dennis


++Processor error on TDS 754D on startup

pmoyle111
 

Last winter we had a power outage where the power co would turn power on for 15 min ever hour or so. The scope was soft turned off by the front button. Since then I have been getting the error message above. I ran SPC but that didn't change anything. Looking at the log there are lots of (loosely quoting) nvRam crcc errors. I am getting a gpib interface from Prologix that someone wrote a nice interface for that I found searching this topic. I also got a copy of the nvram file.

Should I be able to fix this by writing a new file, or will the nvRams need replacing? I assume that if I don't cycle power, the SPC should not have that error after uploading new image?

This seems to be a common problem. Anyone have any comments advice?


Members in Germany, Brussels, and the Netherlands affected by the floods

 

If you are in the region affected by the flooding in Germany, Brussels, or
The Netherlands pleased contact me (dennis at ridesoft dot com) if there is
anything I can do or TekScopes can do to help.
Dennis


Re: A high-priced Tektronix RM504

Harvey White
 

And Cordwainer Bird is still collecting residuals.....

Harvey

for "Io" (as in Jupiter's moon) on Netflix
Yup... humanity escapes a toxic Earth (where it's still possible to live) to go to Io to die for certain... where the razor thin atmosphere is almost all sulphur dioxide, and Jupiter's intense radiation will cook you.
Harlan Ellison is somewhere throwing up.


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Jim Ford
 

My deepest condolences on your loss, Gordon.   It's hard enough to have to put a dog to sleep, as we did last weekend, but to lose your wife wow, I can only imagine!  Feel free to PM me if you want to talk.       Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Gordon Smith <gfsmith@cox.net> Date: 7/15/21 12:10 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Smoke damage 7704A Hi All,For cigarette smoke smell and tar removal, I can most enthusiastically recommend Simple Green. My dearly departed wife was a 2 pack a day smoker (Yep, the smoking was the root cause of her passing away) and left our home a smokey mess. After finding out I was allergic to smoke tar (I have always been a non-smoker and having smoke allergies can happen to people who live with smokers or are around tobacco products) I have been slowly decontaminating the home. I have seen smoke/tar covered items literally drip off the smoke/tar from their surfaces after being sprayed with Simple Green. It works far better than soap and water. In the case of electronics, I believe that Simple Green can be slightly corrosive to the components if left on, so a liberal rinse with water and DI water afterwards with internal pots protected from the Simple Green I think would be called for. YMMV. GordonOn Thu, Jul 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM, greenboxmaven wrote:>> Trisodium phosphate is indeed a good cleaner. It can be difficult to


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Roy Thistle
 

On Thu, Jul 15, 2021 at 07:48 AM, Tom Norman wrote:


Tek used something called Kellite in their wash station
Nope.
It was Kelite (not Kellite)... lot's of stuff pops up including the logo "Scientific Cleaning Through PH Control."
Anyway... it was just a buffered alkaline detergent... nothing special.

--
Roy Thistle


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

greenboxmaven
 

I use Simple Green all the time when giving a rig a bath. It doesn't always get rid of tobacco stench, but if followed by another rinse with ammonia everything smells great. I collect water from my dehumidifier or central air conditioner, filter it, and use it for a final rinse. After removing motors, loudspeakers, and meters, I have never damaged anything in forty years of cleaning rigs this way. I dry everything with several hours in a hotbox heated with a blow dryer blowing hot air through.

    Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 7/15/21 15:10, Gordon Smith wrote:
Hi All,
For cigarette smoke smell and tar removal, I can most enthusiastically recommend Simple Green. My dearly departed wife was a 2 pack a day smoker (Yep, the smoking was the root cause of her passing away) and left our home a smokey mess. After finding out I was allergic to smoke tar (I have always been a non-smoker and having smoke allergies can happen to people who live with smokers or are around tobacco products) I have been slowly decontaminating the home. I have seen smoke/tar covered items literally drip off the smoke/tar from their surfaces after being sprayed with Simple Green. It works far better than soap and water. In the case of electronics, I believe that Simple Green can be slightly corrosive to the components if left on, so a liberal rinse with water and DI water afterwards with internal pots protected from the Simple Green I think would be called for. YMMV. Gordon

On Thu, Jul 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM, greenboxmaven wrote:
Trisodium phosphate is indeed a good cleaner. It can be difficult to


Re: A high-priced Tektronix RM504

Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 10:03 PM, stevenhorii wrote:


look
for "Io" (as in Jupiter's moon) on Netflix
Yup... humanity escapes a toxic Earth (where it's still possible to live) to go to Io to die for certain... where the razor thin atmosphere is almost all sulphur dioxide, and Jupiter's intense radiation will cook you.
Harlan Ellison is somewhere throwing up.
--
Roy Thistle


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Gordon Smith
 

Hi All,
For cigarette smoke smell and tar removal, I can most enthusiastically recommend Simple Green. My dearly departed wife was a 2 pack a day smoker (Yep, the smoking was the root cause of her passing away) and left our home a smokey mess. After finding out I was allergic to smoke tar (I have always been a non-smoker and having smoke allergies can happen to people who live with smokers or are around tobacco products) I have been slowly decontaminating the home. I have seen smoke/tar covered items literally drip off the smoke/tar from their surfaces after being sprayed with Simple Green. It works far better than soap and water. In the case of electronics, I believe that Simple Green can be slightly corrosive to the components if left on, so a liberal rinse with water and DI water afterwards with internal pots protected from the Simple Green I think would be called for. YMMV. Gordon

On Thu, Jul 15, 2021 at 10:13 AM, greenboxmaven wrote:

Trisodium phosphate is indeed a good cleaner. It can be difficult to


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 10:33 PM, Ed Breya wrote:


possibly limonene
It doesn't dissolve in water... it's a terpine oil... dissolves in alcohols (among other things.)
It also "eventually?" attacks brass, copper, cast iron, rubber, silicone... and some plastics... but, were mainly talking about not storing the pure oil in containers made of those.
I don't know what adding a few drops of limonene to some emulsifier does in a detergent water solution... beyond making you green, smelling fruity clean, and fleecing one of even more money.

--
Roy Thistle


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Roy Thistle
 

On Thu, Jul 15, 2021 at 07:48 AM, Tom Norman wrote:


Alconox
It's just a fancy detergent... it has an effective surfactant (wetting agent), and works well with hard/er water. Less harsh than TSP (although it uses that) because of the TSPP buffer in it.
Save your money... a mild solution of dish detergent (detergent is not soap, just because it's used like soap) and distilled water (or softened water) is just as good for safe cleaning. Use the more specialised, and possibly harsher stuff, if'n you have to.

--
Roy Thistle


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Roy Thistle
 

TSP... available at any painter's (not artist... or maybe not artists) jobber/supplier.
TSP available at BLowes, Home Despot. N.A. wide.
Should you use a very powerful de-greaser on a something that has no grease on it?
Not only that the phosphate attacks/etches, at least, glass,aluminium, and paint.
Roy Thistle


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 07:16 PM, - wrote:


But if it was me, I would bring it up on a variac
What happens when you bring the 7704's SMPS up on a variac? Is it going to be a good happening?
What happens when you bring up and old byzantine design SMPS up on a variac?

--
Roy Thistle


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

greenboxmaven
 

Trisodium phosphate is indeed a good cleaner. It can be difficult to obtain directly in many places because it is also a powerful fertilizer and causes water pollution if it is dumped down the sewer. Fortunately, it can be had via internet suppliers.  For smoke damage that doesn't come from building fires, cleaners that contain ammonia are quite effective in removing the residue and stench. I have a 555 that I couldn't bring into the house because it stunk so badly. No question as to why the previous owner was SK! I fear a totally new kind of damage as addicts try using vaporizers, their exhaust doesn't stink, but it contains a great deal of polyethylene glycol mist. I can imagine it will affect plastics, and it draws moisture from the air. Who knows what leakage paths will be created. Considering the indoor pollution that was constant in repair shops and broadcast stations decades ago, and the cooling fans circulating it through everything, Tektronix gear stood up to it very well.

    Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 7/15/21 11:46, Torch wrote:
One of the most effective cleaners for removing smoke residue and smell from the exterior is a dilute solution of Tri-sodium Phosphate (TSP) in water. Available in most hardware stores, usually in the paint department. Wear gloves -- it will dehydrate your hands. Wipe on, wipe off, then wipe again with a clean cloth wetted with plain water. Start at the top and work down.

Smoke in a house fire will follow air movement. There is a very good chance that none entered the case itself if it was not hit by water during suppression. Of course, if it got wet, the water can carry residue into the interior. Rinsing with pure (distilled) water is usually the best thing to use inside electronics. Allow to dry thoroughly, preferably with a fan blowing dry air over all surfaces for a few days to be sure.

(Lessons learned from 34 years of firefighting experience)




OT: Looking for a Pentium M765 (or maybe M780 - not sure it that will work)

 

I have a scope (not Tektronix or HP/K/A) that uses the BCM MX855 mobo with a
1.3 Celeron.

I'd like to give a late life performance boost and an told a Pentium M765
will do the job and maybe even an M780 (though that may depend on BIOS
levels).

Can anyone help? If you also have stick on PC2700/PC3200 1GB Ram that would
be great too!

Thanks
David


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Torch
 

One of the most effective cleaners for removing smoke residue and smell from the exterior is a dilute solution of Tri-sodium Phosphate (TSP) in water. Available in most hardware stores, usually in the paint department. Wear gloves -- it will dehydrate your hands. Wipe on, wipe off, then wipe again with a clean cloth wetted with plain water. Start at the top and work down.

Smoke in a house fire will follow air movement. There is a very good chance that none entered the case itself if it was not hit by water during suppression. Of course, if it got wet, the water can carry residue into the interior. Rinsing with pure (distilled) water is usually the best thing to use inside electronics. Allow to dry thoroughly, preferably with a fan blowing dry air over all surfaces for a few days to be sure.

(Lessons learned from 34 years of firefighting experience)


Re: Tek 2230 Repair and Maintenance

Albert Otten
 

Hi Charlie,
My question is, how do these operate to form the signal for the A11A1U6106 MUX?
The cursor pot itself does nothing special. The wipers are wired to separate MUX input lines. My interpretation is that the processor does the job to find out the direction (and also speed?) of knob rotation based on changes in successive voltage readings.
On start up of the "good" scope I keep seeing this image on the CRT
https://photos.app.goo.gl/GwUdDxu25jh4APwZ6
You noticed perhaps that this is the display shown by ADV Funct -> Cal -> Box -> Run. Normally you would return from this by once more pressing AD Funct. But the scope is stuck and doesn't listen any more to buttons pressed?

Albert


Re: Smoke damage 7704A

Tom Norman
 

Tek used something called Kellite in their wash station. Tekwiki has an article about it in it's maintenance section under "cleaning", and I think there are threads on TekScopes as well. Kellite, seems to be no longer available, and I've not found much information about it, except that it may have been a buffered phosphate type cleaner (no chemist here, so be kind!). I remembered using Alconox in a couple of chem classes for cleanup, and it is phosphate based as well. I've used it to clean two 500 series plugins and a 575 at this point and it worked very well, and doesn't seem as harsh as straight TSP but that is a subjective evaluation (TSP absolutely lights my hands up, the Alconox didn't). I use the same type of siphon gun as Tek, and follow up the Alconox with DI water, and then IPA through the siphon gun. I think the same cautions Ed recommends with respect to it being potentially corrosive to aluminum if not thoroughly rinsed are appropriate. Initial cost of a four pound carton is a bit steep, but it will last you forever.

Tom

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