Date   

Re: Can capacitors

BobH
 

Another source is Tubes and More / Antique Electronic Supply https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/capacitors?filters=Type%3DMulti-Section%20/%20Can%20Type

I have no conection with this company, but have bought a few things from them through the years and it has been good.

BobH


Re: Tek 2236 and the CTM Board

Alex
 

Just for future reference, instead of using two screwdriver shafts there is another way of pushing the knobs off the shaft by using a pair of thin long nose pliers, by positioning each leg on opposite sides of the shaft and under the knob. Then slowly and gently start using leverage action against the front panel to push the knob off the shaft, moving it a little at a time of each stroke until it comes off. Be careful not to scratch the front panel, protect the area of contact with the pliers with a rag of a piece of thin cardboard.


Re: Yet another use for a curve tracer

Daveolla
 

Thanks, "- " (or can I call you "Dash"?...........Prince used a symbol for a bit also, so at least your in good company) I have a B&K 501A and manual but just never got around to using it. I did spend a bit of time making a triple banana plug to 2 bnc plugs cord to use for it, but thats as far as I got. I have been meaning to make the missing scope graticule . There is a pic in the manual of it that should be easy to fix up the image and copy onto a clear transparency. Perhaps a scan of the original maybe handy if someone wants to copy it, but I have done enuf image fixing that I shouldn't need it.. Presently I am fixing a manual I downloaded from the Amprobe site that has all the pages crooked, some near off by 45 degrees. You would think a company would want to represent them selves a little more dignity, I would be embarrassed if I did a scan a like this to show it to anyone, let alone the whole world!!!!!

Dave

At 10:33 PM 12/04/2020, you wrote:
I don't have a BK 501 but I do have a B&K 540 "Component tester". It's a
small AC powered unit with about a 2 1/2" CRT. The whole thing is about 7
inches wide and about 2 1/2" tall and about 10" deep. IIRC it has two
current ranges and two voltage ranges and it's strictly an I-V tester so
it's not nearly as accurate as the Tektronix curve tracers but it is a
*very* *handy* device to keep on the bench for quick testing of
semiconductors and for identifying passive devices. IIRC it's the same or
very similar to the Polar T1200 component tester.

I have the manual for a B&K 501A and it looks like a decent unit but it
doesn't the capabilities of a Tektronix Curve Tracer but it will display
multiple current steps. It would also be easy to add a variac to it to get
the continuously variable collector voltage capability.

I also have a Hicock unit similar to the B&K 501 but it also has the
capability of testing vacuum tubes. I'm looking for a manual or even just
the specs for it if anyone has them.

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 10:19 PM Daveolla <grobbins@netflash.net> wrote:

Does it not need a minimum load. I just hook them up to the AC cord
and a light bulb. I guess I'm stupid for keeping it simple (KISS)

There were opinions earlier on other brand Curve Tracers, EICO
and Heath, any opinions from the group on the BK 501A Curve Tracer?

Dave


Can capacitors

ken chalfant
 

Greetings,

From time to time I see that someone is working to repair or restore an instrument with the old multi capacitor metal can components and that appears to be a never ending struggle.

The other night I reconnected with an old friend with whom I had not spoken in a couple of years.

He has always had an interest in restoring old audio equipment. As we visited he mentioned a company that still builds Mallory style metal can capacitors. My friend said they even use the old, original equipment.

I was very surprised and actually found that a little hard to believe, but it turns out to be true.

While I do not know about configurations, minimum quantities or pricing it appears this company makes those old style metal can multi-unit capacitors.

www.cemfg.com <http://www.cemfg.com/>

I have no financial interest - or really - any other interest in this - just hoping it helps some of our group.

Regards,

Ken


Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Tom Gardner
 

A simulator should show you the timing range of digital signals, which can be experimentally verified with a logic analyser.

For the corresponding analogue waveforms, simulation requires the i/o IBIS models plus a Spice, and verified with an oscilloscope.

On 05/12/20 01:02, Harvey White wrote:
I remember trying that, and yes, the restrictions are relaxed.  I think it needs either some extra pins to get the signal out or something that uses the programmer.

I sometimes use extra pins for signal tapoffs, and that's after I've simulated it.  Be aware that the simulator generates *perfect* signals and does very little to simulate a real world input.

Harvey


On 12/4/2020 7:18 PM, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 04/12/20 20:54, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
Caveat: I'm a circuit designer by background. I've been pushing CMOS W&L values around my whole career, so I'm no Verilog/System expert.

However, I am a design engineer at Xilinx and have dabbled a little in our software, Vivado. My understanding is that there is a lot of soft IP that comes included with the SW, including logic analyzers. And when it comes to logic analyzers, I only know that they exist and can guess their purpose and functions to some order. I'll have to take a look at this link above, and this thread gets my head going on possible "projects". For example, they love for us to get to know our products at a user level, and do things like giving us a mini Arduino-like system. Like a Raspberry-PI. I wonder if I can install the above on it. Or look at existing LAs included and see what they can and can't do. But then there's the 23 other "projects" I have going on.

As noted by Tom above: "there is a steep learning curve w.r.t. both the HDL and the toolchain." The system level and toolchain are typically what keep me from getting into this, not the underlying code. Could be fun to bridge the worlds of my past and present.
For Xilinx, the search term is "ChipScope". It is intended to enable you to debug internal nodes in your design, but not much imagination  is necessary to see how it could be used for external nodes.

I've lost track of how to what extent it can be freely inserted in your design, but ISTR they relaxed the requirements a year or so ago.

I presume other manufacturers have a similar "product".








Re: 465 B sweep switch cam

Dave Peterson
 

My glue job on the B-delay switch cam was doing really well. I reassembled the switch assembly, attached the A and B knobs (B knob now solid as a rock after re-gluing the plastic and body), and figured out how to align it all. It was working like a charm.

Over the last several days I've gotten my blown C1419 replaced, reassembled the vertical input assembly and so on. Today I was trying to get the A7 board back in and it was giving me a devil of a time, but I got it in. Only lost a little blood. Reattached the A Time/Div knobs, and while attaching the B knob things started going bad. I don't know what did it - I wasn't being harsh with it all. But I realized it had failed again, so I had to take the A7 out again for the 3rd time. Disassembled the Time/Div switch cams and sure enough: the B cam was gone.

All my glue work held fine. It was the rest of the plastic cylinder that crumbled. The good thing is that it's all fallen out of the cam now, including the spring. So I can now see how it's put together. I'll have to build something. I'm not really sure where to begin, but I'll sleep on it. I'll document what I do for posterity.

I haven't had a chance to review the part numbers and variations with serial number. I did find another difference between the manual I have and this scope. It's quite apparent there were a lot of changes. If I want to know this model well there's a lot of history I'm going to have to learn. I would like to learn the part number variations for this cam. It seems a common failure, so it'd be good to know what to look for. I'll keep the "wrong" one I got. The seller is willing to take it as a return, but I have to pay shipping. Might as well keep it. Maybe I'll sell it myself down the road, if I don't end up using it some day.

Dave


Tek blue (and gray) paint

stevenhorii
 

I just found a seller on eBay who has some cans of Tek blue (and a can of
old Tek gray) paint:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tektronix-spray-paint-Tek-blue/184184194077

I bought a couple of cans. I figured the rest would also go quickly.

Steve Horii


Re: Tek 2236 and the CTM Board

greenboxmaven
 

Great job! As for the power supply cover, my scope (2230) was a totally dismantled basket case when I got it, so I had to figure out how to manuver the shield back in place, especially with all of the wiring in disarray. Two of the hinge halves mounted on the chassis for the top board were cracked and the screws could not be tightened. I removed them, super glued the cracks, and tried re-installing them. They broke again at moderate tension. I super glued them again, and began looking for another way to use them. I removed the two mating halves from the circuit board because they are all the same and in excellent condition. I countersunk the screw holes enough so the taper of the flathead screws holding them to the chassis would not bottom out and try to expand the holes. Now the halves on the chassis were secure. I took the repaired ones, drilled out the threads, and ground the heads of two flathead 4-40 bolts to a "D" shape, so they would go into the holes without strain and fit flat on the side tab of the hinges. I put a few drops of super glue on the circuit board, and immediately installed, aligned, and tightened the nuts I applied to the bolts. After a few minutes. I loosened the front chassis hinge half for clearance, installed the board, and tightened the chassis half. This was all before I made other repairs and got the scope working. After trying to install the power supply cover, I realized I had to remove the top board once again to get it in place, this time the hinges were fine and everything went back together after the cover was in place. Can you read the voltage of an input on yours with the digital multimeter while observing it's waveform? That could be a big help for troubleshooting an intermittent problem. The 22XX is light and feature packed, but I don't get the sense of physical ruggedness the older scopes had, even though mine was utterly filthy before I restored it. That has to count for something.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 12/4/20 23:04, Jeff Dutky wrote:
I got the 2236 reassembled, but I had to unmount the CTM board in order to get the power supply cover back in place (the CTM board and its back hinge interfered with getting the power supply cover back in, and this was only made more difficult by the fact that the alt sweep board is not removable, at least not without unsoldering a couple dozen pins). The fan sounds a little better than it did, but I've ordered a replacement anyway, because I figure its going to fail eventually, and the replacement was only $5.

After buttoning everything up and playing around with all the toys (it's awfully nice to have a multi-meter/counter-timer that can read what you've got on the screen!) I realized that the x10 mag wasn't working. At all. So I unbuttoned everything (except the power supply) and had a good slow wander through the service manual again. It turns out that the x10 mag function is supported by a handful of passive components hanging off of one IC, and you can pretty much test them all because the x10 mag switch breaks the loop in the circuit. I found that the trim pot was reading 3x what its maximum value should be (it's a 100K pot, but was reading almost 300K). I figured that there was no harm in fiddling with it to see if it could be brought into trim, because I'd have to adjust it anyhow if I replaced it, but when I twiddled it just a little bit it came back into trim. I ginned up a signal that spanned 10 cycles across the reticule, pulled the 10x mag, and trimmed it to show exactly one cycle. Good enough for government work.

I also cross checked the counter-timer against two of my other DMMs that have a Hz measurement feature, and everyone agrees to within 1% so I'm feeling pretty confident in the 2236 CTM features.

So now I've got a 100MHz scope with multi-meter that I can use to check the 475 and 475A, which both still need some attention.

I really feel like I'm getting my sea legs now. I think I'm beginning to really understand a bunch of things that were only the vaguest theory to me before this (transistor circuits are just coming into focus, for example), and I'm getting a lot more confident in both my ability to diagnose problems, and manually perform the work to fix them. I'm also feeling confident enough in my abilities to tackle the two scopes that belonged to my dad without fear that I'll do something stupid and destroy one of them. It's a good feeling.

-- Jeff Dutky





Re: Yet another use for a curve tracer

-
 

I don't have a BK 501 but I do have a B&K 540 "Component tester". It's a
small AC powered unit with about a 2 1/2" CRT. The whole thing is about 7
inches wide and about 2 1/2" tall and about 10" deep. IIRC it has two
current ranges and two voltage ranges and it's strictly an I-V tester so
it's not nearly as accurate as the Tektronix curve tracers but it is a
*very* *handy* device to keep on the bench for quick testing of
semiconductors and for identifying passive devices. IIRC it's the same or
very similar to the Polar T1200 component tester.

I have the manual for a B&K 501A and it looks like a decent unit but it
doesn't the capabilities of a Tektronix Curve Tracer but it will display
multiple current steps. It would also be easy to add a variac to it to get
the continuously variable collector voltage capability.

I also have a Hicock unit similar to the B&K 501 but it also has the
capability of testing vacuum tubes. I'm looking for a manual or even just
the specs for it if anyone has them.

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 10:19 PM Daveolla <grobbins@netflash.net> wrote:

Does it not need a minimum load. I just hook them up to the AC cord
and a light bulb. I guess I'm stupid for keeping it simple (KISS)

There were opinions earlier on other brand Curve Tracers, EICO
and Heath, any opinions from the group on the BK 501A Curve Tracer?

Dave



At 08:18 PM 12/04/2020, you wrote:
I've been cleaning up and organizing lots of stuff lately, and I
found I had a couple dozen various AC light dimmers and fan controls
piled up. After I eliminated the obvious junkers - marked bad, taken
apart, busted parts, etc - I had about a dozen left, to save for
possible re-use. I decided to check them out on the curve tracer, to
eliminate any more bad ones from stock.

I set up the 576 for AC, 350 V peak range, series R 680 ohms, H 50
V/div, V 100 mA/div, and started testing. It worked great, and all
of the two-terminal types checked OK. There are some three- and
four-terminal ones that need further study to figure out appropriate
hookup. Here's the process, for two-terminal types:

1. Set collector supply to zero.
2. Hook up dimmer.
3 Set collector to about 175 V peak.
4. Run dimmer knob through OFF and full range.
5. Display appearance should change according to dimmer setting,
from a flat line or small "+" to a large "+," indicating proper operation.
6. Turn collector back to zero.
7. Disconnect dimmer, and connect the next one.
Repeat as needed.

Ed









Re: Tek 2236 and the CTM Board

 

I got the 2236 reassembled, but I had to unmount the CTM board in order to get the power supply cover back in place (the CTM board and its back hinge interfered with getting the power supply cover back in, and this was only made more difficult by the fact that the alt sweep board is not removable, at least not without unsoldering a couple dozen pins). The fan sounds a little better than it did, but I've ordered a replacement anyway, because I figure its going to fail eventually, and the replacement was only $5.

After buttoning everything up and playing around with all the toys (it's awfully nice to have a multi-meter/counter-timer that can read what you've got on the screen!) I realized that the x10 mag wasn't working. At all. So I unbuttoned everything (except the power supply) and had a good slow wander through the service manual again. It turns out that the x10 mag function is supported by a handful of passive components hanging off of one IC, and you can pretty much test them all because the x10 mag switch breaks the loop in the circuit. I found that the trim pot was reading 3x what its maximum value should be (it's a 100K pot, but was reading almost 300K). I figured that there was no harm in fiddling with it to see if it could be brought into trim, because I'd have to adjust it anyhow if I replaced it, but when I twiddled it just a little bit it came back into trim. I ginned up a signal that spanned 10 cycles across the reticule, pulled the 10x mag, and trimmed it to show exactly one cycle. Good enough for government work.

I also cross checked the counter-timer against two of my other DMMs that have a Hz measurement feature, and everyone agrees to within 1% so I'm feeling pretty confident in the 2236 CTM features.

So now I've got a 100MHz scope with multi-meter that I can use to check the 475 and 475A, which both still need some attention.

I really feel like I'm getting my sea legs now. I think I'm beginning to really understand a bunch of things that were only the vaguest theory to me before this (transistor circuits are just coming into focus, for example), and I'm getting a lot more confident in both my ability to diagnose problems, and manually perform the work to fix them. I'm also feeling confident enough in my abilities to tackle the two scopes that belonged to my dad without fear that I'll do something stupid and destroy one of them. It's a good feeling.

-- Jeff Dutky


Re: Yet another use for a curve tracer

Ed Breya
 

The old-fashioned way would work too, but this was simplest for me to turn it on and set up. The whole thing took only a few minutes to check them all. It would take me much longer just to find a bulb socket - I know I should have one somewhere around here.

Ed


Re: Yet another use for a curve tracer

Daveolla
 

Does it not need a minimum load. I just hook them up to the AC cord and a light bulb. I guess I'm stupid for keeping it simple (KISS)

There were opinions earlier on other brand Curve Tracers, EICO and Heath, any opinions from the group on the BK 501A Curve Tracer?

Dave

At 08:18 PM 12/04/2020, you wrote:
I've been cleaning up and organizing lots of stuff lately, and I found I had a couple dozen various AC light dimmers and fan controls piled up. After I eliminated the obvious junkers - marked bad, taken apart, busted parts, etc - I had about a dozen left, to save for possible re-use. I decided to check them out on the curve tracer, to eliminate any more bad ones from stock.

I set up the 576 for AC, 350 V peak range, series R 680 ohms, H 50 V/div, V 100 mA/div, and started testing. It worked great, and all of the two-terminal types checked OK. There are some three- and four-terminal ones that need further study to figure out appropriate hookup. Here's the process, for two-terminal types:

1. Set collector supply to zero.
2. Hook up dimmer.
3 Set collector to about 175 V peak.
4. Run dimmer knob through OFF and full range.
5. Display appearance should change according to dimmer setting, from a flat line or small "+" to a large "+," indicating proper operation.
6. Turn collector back to zero.
7. Disconnect dimmer, and connect the next one.
Repeat as needed.

Ed



Yet another use for a curve tracer

Ed Breya
 

I've been cleaning up and organizing lots of stuff lately, and I found I had a couple dozen various AC light dimmers and fan controls piled up. After I eliminated the obvious junkers - marked bad, taken apart, busted parts, etc - I had about a dozen left, to save for possible re-use. I decided to check them out on the curve tracer, to eliminate any more bad ones from stock.

I set up the 576 for AC, 350 V peak range, series R 680 ohms, H 50 V/div, V 100 mA/div, and started testing. It worked great, and all of the two-terminal types checked OK. There are some three- and four-terminal ones that need further study to figure out appropriate hookup. Here's the process, for two-terminal types:

1. Set collector supply to zero.
2. Hook up dimmer.
3 Set collector to about 175 V peak.
4. Run dimmer knob through OFF and full range.
5. Display appearance should change according to dimmer setting, from a flat line or small "+" to a large "+," indicating proper operation.
6. Turn collector back to zero.
7. Disconnect dimmer, and connect the next one.
Repeat as needed.

Ed


Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Harvey White
 

analog or digital?

TTL 5 volt levels?

74LS logic ok?

Can you live with a dual polarity supply or do you have only 5 volts available?

Harvey

On 12/4/2020 7:52 PM, Tony Fleming wrote:
Where can I find some schematics that someone like me can follow?
Thanks.

Have a Happy Holidays and wishing you and your family lots of health, love
and no problems!

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 6:42 PM Chris Wilkson via groups.io <cwilkson=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 09:38 AM, Harvey White wrote:
Essentially, I got 8 traces time multiplexed onto 1 trace. Worked for
TTL only, but that's what I needed.
I've done that too. It also works with analog signals. You just need
some analog switches/muxes instead of the TTL digital mux.
In either case, if you run the scope in X/Y mode with the counter driving
"Y" through a DAC you can see all of the traces at once, similar to the
standard "ALT" mode display.

There are a lot of similar tricks you can play by running in X/Y mode with
external helper circuits.








Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Harvey White
 

I remember trying that, and yes, the restrictions are relaxed.  I think it needs either some extra pins to get the signal out or something that uses the programmer.

I sometimes use extra pins for signal tapoffs, and that's after I've simulated it.  Be aware that the simulator generates *perfect* signals and does very little to simulate a real world input.

Harvey

On 12/4/2020 7:18 PM, Tom Gardner wrote:
On 04/12/20 20:54, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
Caveat: I'm a circuit designer by background. I've been pushing CMOS W&L values around my whole career, so I'm no Verilog/System expert.

However, I am a design engineer at Xilinx and have dabbled a little in our software, Vivado. My understanding is that there is a lot of soft IP that comes included with the SW, including logic analyzers. And when it comes to logic analyzers, I only know that they exist and can guess their purpose and functions to some order. I'll have to take a look at this link above, and this thread gets my head going on possible "projects". For example, they love for us to get to know our products at a user level, and do things like giving us a mini Arduino-like system. Like a Raspberry-PI. I wonder if I can install the above on it. Or look at existing LAs included and see what they can and can't do. But then there's the 23 other "projects" I have going on.

As noted by Tom above: "there is a steep learning curve w.r.t. both the HDL and the toolchain." The system level and toolchain are typically what keep me from getting into this, not the underlying code. Could be fun to bridge the worlds of my past and present.
For Xilinx, the search term is "ChipScope". It is intended to enable you to debug internal nodes in your design, but not much imagination  is necessary to see how it could be used for external nodes.

I've lost track of how to what extent it can be freely inserted in your design, but ISTR they relaxed the requirements a year or so ago.

I presume other manufacturers have a similar "product".





Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Tony Fleming
 

Where can I find some schematics that someone like me can follow?
Thanks.

Have a Happy Holidays and wishing you and your family lots of health, love
and no problems!

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 6:42 PM Chris Wilkson via groups.io <cwilkson=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 09:38 AM, Harvey White wrote:

Essentially, I got 8 traces time multiplexed onto 1 trace. Worked for
TTL only, but that's what I needed.
I've done that too. It also works with analog signals. You just need
some analog switches/muxes instead of the TTL digital mux.
In either case, if you run the scope in X/Y mode with the counter driving
"Y" through a DAC you can see all of the traces at once, similar to the
standard "ALT" mode display.

There are a lot of similar tricks you can play by running in X/Y mode with
external helper circuits.






Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Chris Wilkson
 

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 09:38 AM, Harvey White wrote:

Essentially, I got 8 traces time multiplexed onto 1 trace. Worked for
TTL only, but that's what I needed.
I've done that too. It also works with analog signals. You just need some analog switches/muxes instead of the TTL digital mux.
In either case, if you run the scope in X/Y mode with the counter driving "Y" through a DAC you can see all of the traces at once, similar to the standard "ALT" mode display.

There are a lot of similar tricks you can play by running in X/Y mode with external helper circuits.


Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Tom Gardner
 

On 04/12/20 20:54, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
Caveat: I'm a circuit designer by background. I've been pushing CMOS W&L values around my whole career, so I'm no Verilog/System expert.

However, I am a design engineer at Xilinx and have dabbled a little in our software, Vivado. My understanding is that there is a lot of soft IP that comes included with the SW, including logic analyzers. And when it comes to logic analyzers, I only know that they exist and can guess their purpose and functions to some order. I'll have to take a look at this link above, and this thread gets my head going on possible "projects". For example, they love for us to get to know our products at a user level, and do things like giving us a mini Arduino-like system. Like a Raspberry-PI. I wonder if I can install the above on it. Or look at existing LAs included and see what they can and can't do. But then there's the 23 other "projects" I have going on.

As noted by Tom above: "there is a steep learning curve w.r.t. both the HDL and the toolchain." The system level and toolchain are typically what keep me from getting into this, not the underlying code. Could be fun to bridge the worlds of my past and present.
For Xilinx, the search term is "ChipScope". It is intended to enable you to debug internal nodes in your design, but not much imagination  is necessary to see how it could be used for external nodes.

I've lost track of how to what extent it can be freely inserted in your design, but ISTR they relaxed the requirements a year or so ago.

I presume other manufacturers have a similar "product".


Re: Historical Analog Scope Triggering Techniques

Harvey White
 

I've used Xilinx, the Coolrunner2 (X2Cxxx) CPLD, and Spartan 3AN, and Spartan 6 FPGAS.  I started out in hardware and switched to software, then went over to systems design.

Vivado, unfortunately, will not (as I understand) any of the above chips, you'll need ISE design suite.  The soft ISP available is somewhat limited, and Xilinx (naturally) wants money for this. (That's on the free versions, I can't afford the more expensive ones).

For a logic analyzer, you are likely to need a trigger recognizer (based on the inputs), to start capture.  You'll need an incrementing counter that stores data into the internal memory. The source for this counter can be either an internal clock (derived from a timebase) or an external clock (state machine). I'd suggest an SPI  interfaced register structure (read/write), which requires something like the spartan 6 (it takes space!) to control the system operation.

I've got such, written in VHDL.  I do have eventual plans to build a logic analyzer, running with an ARM processor, color touchscreen display, and battery powered (I have a fondness for portable equipment).  Same processor/interface could easily support a sensor platform and an IC checker.

Most of the problems I've had are to understand the tools, what some of the equivalences there are between the built in (hardware) primitives and the VHDL itself.  VHDL is somewhat a mixture of Pascal, C++, and Basic.  Not too difficult.

There are some nice designs on opencores which can be used, I did find a very nice SPI interface that can be installed with only a few tweaks.

If you're not doing your own PC boards, buying one that has all the bypass caps and as much I/O as possible is a good idea.  If you can get one with a built in programmer (will be needed!), that's a plus.

Again, the major hardware issue, system wise, is the interface levels.  The Xilinx parts that I use are not 5.0 volt tolerant, so that's a problem to solve.  On an individual pin basis, as long as you're doing 3.3 volt only, you can implement the equivalent of a 6820 parallel I/O port.

It's possible to re-engineer some of the Tektronix digital parts using CPLDs or FPGAs (the more the better) for retrofitting, if that's needed.

Harvey

On 12/4/2020 3:54 PM, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
Caveat: I'm a circuit designer by background. I've been pushing CMOS W&L values around my whole career, so I'm no Verilog/System expert.

However, I am a design engineer at Xilinx and have dabbled a little in our software, Vivado. My understanding is that there is a lot of soft IP that comes included with the SW, including logic analyzers. And when it comes to logic analyzers, I only know that they exist and can guess their purpose and functions to some order. I'll have to take a look at this link above, and this thread gets my head going on possible "projects". For example, they love for us to get to know our products at a user level, and do things like giving us a mini Arduino-like system. Like a Raspberry-PI. I wonder if I can install the above on it. Or look at existing LAs included and see what they can and can't do. But then there's the 23 other "projects" I have going on.

As noted by Tom above: "there is a steep learning curve w.r.t. both the HDL and the toolchain." The system level and toolchain are typically what keep me from getting into this, not the underlying code. Could be fun to bridge the worlds of my past and present.

Dave





Re: Peter Keller book payments PayPal won't release

Roy Thistle
 

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 09:54 AM, Tam Hanna wrote:


everyone misunderstands me at the moment.
Tam, I can safely say, I've never really understood your posts; but, I always read, and enjoy, reading them.
I also did offer to help out, here in the colonies.
Best regards.

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