Date   

Re: Open filament on CRT

greenboxmaven
 

What you describe was often used as a last resort to salvage a television picture tube. It is very unlikely to work if the break is in the middle of the heater winding. It did sometimes work when the end of the heater wire had broken loose from the strap or lead that carried the current to it. Not burned in two, but hanging loose. It was not always a permanent repair, thermal stresses to the weld would often cause it to break loose again. A similar technique was used to weld a loose connection back to the cathode cup or first grid. People have been zapping bad jugs for decades, success and longevity are very unpredictable.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 11/19/20 9:53 PM, Marvin Moss wrote:
*I wonder if anyone has tried a large capacitor and high voltage to weld an open filament in a CRT?*
*And how did it work out? Supposedly a cap with 2 or 3 hundred mfd and a high voltage to create an arc in the open filament will create a bridge in the filament and will make it conduct and form a new place where the filament can come back to life in the CRT. Your thoughts on this??
*





Re: Difference between a 475 and a 475A

 

Dr. Lee, and Harvey White,

Thanks for the informative responses, that does make more sense, especially in light of an impulse input, which I understand implies a broad spectrum of underlying frequencies including very high frequencies (in order to reconstruct the impulse from the elements of the Fourier decomposition). Those high frequencies, which are required to get a good steep rise time, will also show up as high frequency ringing after the rise and fall, which messes up the fidelity to the overall shape of the pulse.

This also makes sense to me from a mechanical analog to the electrical signal: if you have a damped spring system you can either get fast changes in the displacement, but have lots of wiggling afterwards, or you can have very little wiggling but the displacement is slowed down a lot. A loose piston attached to the spring lets the spring change length very quickly, but doesn't do much to damp overshoot and undershoot or to dissipate the energy in the spring after the change in length, but a stiff piston which will rapidly stop the under/overshoot will also make it much harder and slower the change the length of the spring.


Open filament on CRT

Marvin Moss
 

*I wonder if anyone has tried a large capacitor and high voltage to weld an open filament in a CRT?*
*And how did it work out?  Supposedly a cap with 2 or 3 hundred mfd and a high voltage to create an arc in the open filament will create a bridge in the filament and will make it conduct and form a new place where the filament can come back to life in the CRT.  Your thoughts on this??
*


Re: Difference between a 475 and a 475A

Harvey White
 

There's a subtle "gotcha" in here.  It may be best thought of as the problem when designing a filter (lowpass, highpass, bandpass, doesn't matter, but something designed to cut off a bunch of frequencies - or allow them to go though)

In general, as I remember it, the sharper the response (the better the filter is at rejecting things really close to the edge of what it thinks is ok), the more ripple in the filter passband.

To state it another way, the filters that have the flattest response across the frequencies that are "OK" are the ones with the most shallow slope on the cutoff.  That is, they're the ones that aren't sharp.  The sharper the filter (the better it is for rejecting the "out of band" frequencies), the worse it is for flatness.  You can fix that, but only at the expense of adding more parts and other compromises.  Certain filter designs are optimized for flatness, certain for edge response.

Oscilloscope wise (and I can be wrong here), you optimize an oscilloscope response (because it has a LOT of filters for adjusting response and compensating for it, so think of the entire vertical amplifier as a big filter with gain) for either flatness (good for bandwidth measurements) OR you optimize it for pulse response (which means that the gain across the bandwidth is not even).

You get one or the other, depending on what you are measuring. Since the two adjustments (pulse fidelity and frequency fidelity (so to say) are complementary, you don't get both.

Typically, pulse response accentuates the high end response of the scope (and makes the pulse edges look good) at the expense of the frequency response (which may make the flat part of the pulse look bad, depending on frequency).

Hope that I explained it well enough, and I got it right.

Harvey

On 11/19/2020 8:58 PM, Jeff Dutky wrote:
John Gord wrote:
the 475A was basically the same as the 475, but adjusted for higher bandwidth but perhaps slightly inferior pulse response
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying here: wouldn't "inferior pulse response" mean a longer rise time? Wouldn't a longer rise time necessarily mean a lower bandwidth?

I don't really understand all the math, but my impression, from evaluating my father's 475 and probes a couple months ago, was that you calculated bandwidth as the inverse of rise time multiplied by a constant (0.3-something?). Am I misunderstanding what is meant by "pulse response"?t

-- Jeff Dutky





Re: Difference between a 475 and a 475A

Tom Lee
 

You're narrowly interpreting "inferior" to mean "slow", but there are other qualities to consider, such as overshoot, ringing, "dribble" and so on. If you allow a little extra overshoot, it's possible to have a higher bandwidth, for example, but if you're fussy about the time response, then that tradeoff would be considered inferior.

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/19/2020 17:58, Jeff Dutky wrote:
John Gord wrote:
the 475A was basically the same as the 475, but adjusted for higher bandwidth but perhaps slightly inferior pulse response
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying here: wouldn't "inferior pulse response" mean a longer rise time? Wouldn't a longer rise time necessarily mean a lower bandwidth?

I don't really understand all the math, but my impression, from evaluating my father's 475 and probes a couple months ago, was that you calculated bandwidth as the inverse of rise time multiplied by a constant (0.3-something?). Am I misunderstanding what is meant by "pulse response"?

-- Jeff Dutky




Re: Difference between a 475 and a 475A

 

John Gord wrote:

the 475A was basically the same as the 475, but adjusted for higher bandwidth but perhaps slightly inferior pulse response
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying here: wouldn't "inferior pulse response" mean a longer rise time? Wouldn't a longer rise time necessarily mean a lower bandwidth?

I don't really understand all the math, but my impression, from evaluating my father's 475 and probes a couple months ago, was that you calculated bandwidth as the inverse of rise time multiplied by a constant (0.3-something?). Am I misunderstanding what is meant by "pulse response"?

-- Jeff Dutky


Re: Difference between a 475 and a 475A

 

John Gord wrote:

My unresearched recollection is that the 475A was basically the same as the 475, but adjusted for higher bandwidth but
perhaps slightly inferior pulse response. The 475A lacked the 2mV/div vertical setting.
Cool. That's something that I can verify! The scope whose faceplate reads "475A" does indeed lack a 2mV range (and it has a 100V range, which the 475s lack). That means that I should be able to see a difference in the cams for the vertical range switches (same number of cam positions, but they should engage different sets of attenuator blocks, or the blocks should have different values).

If the 475A were working better I could also check the pulse response, as I acquired the tools to do that measurement while evaluating my father's scope a few months ago. I'll be checking the pulse response of the both of these scopes under any circumstance, once I've repaired whatever is wrong with the 475A, just so I know what parts are good candidates as spares.

I suppose that this would also mean that, if you had swapped the front panel and knobs from a 475 onto the innards of a 475A, the V/div would be wrong (everything would be off by one position). That should be easy to verify on the suspect 475 (except that the V/div knob skirt is basically illegible from whatever is spattered all over the poor scope).

Any advice on what kinds of solvents are reasonable to use on the front panel and knobs of a 475?

I've tried both of the suggested cleaning agents -- detergent with water and isopropyl alcohol -- to no effect on this scope. I'd like to clean up some of the surviving knobs and skirts, but don't want to use anything that will damage the plastic or paint.


Re: 465M Wave Forms

DaveH52
 

A EXT Trigger of the 460A to the A Gate of the 465M rear panel.
Probe on channel 1 input of the 460A then use it to poke around in the 465M


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

 

Please READ my most recent post particular the part about sending me your address.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael Lloyd
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2020 7:57 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Is it too late to get on this lists?







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Broken Tektronix scopes free

Walter Hunter
 

Hi:
I m interested in the 465.
Wallaby

On Thu, Nov 19, 2020 at 9:47 AM Michael W. Lynch via groups.io <mlynch003=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I would like to hear more about the 465's

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR






[Tek2440] Java GUI feedback requested. #photo-notice

Jan de Jongh
 

Dear Tekkers,

Over the past two months or so, I've been working on a [Java] GUI for my Tek2440 accessed through a ProLogix GPIB-ETH . Since I still do not know all the Tek2440's features that well, I'm asking this group for feedback on the GUI I constructed so far. A screenshot is in Photos (don't know how to embed/refer; tips WELCOME!). In the figure, all gray rectangles pop up a dialog for controlling the particular group settings.

Main questions are:
- Should specific functions/settings now embedded in dialogs be available in the main application window?
- Should functions be moved into dialogs?

Needless to say, I cannot make all settings available on 900p/1080p, sp I have to make choices...

Thanks for your response; FYI, the code is on https://github.com/jandejongh/jinstrument although I'm planning on forking a Tek2440 specific project.

BR
jan - pa3gyf.


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

 

Is it too late to get on this lists?


Re: Difference between a 475 and a 475A

John Gord
 

Jeff,
My unresearched recollection is that the 475A was basically the same as the 475, but adjusted for higher bandwidth but perhaps slightly inferior pulse response. The 475A lacked the 2mV/div vertical setting.
--John Gord


Difference between a 475 and a 475A

 

I have a 475 that belonged to my father, manufactured in late 1974, that I have a sentimental attachment to and would like to keep running. To this end I have purchased several "for parts" scopes on eBay, both 475s and 475As, because many of the mechanical parts appear to be completely interchangeable. I had terrible luck with the first parts scope: while it is in terrible cosmetic condition (busted knobs, spattered with something that does not wash off with soap and water or with isopropyl alcohol), it appears to be operating flawlessly. Next I received a 475A which appears to be a much better donor candidate as it appears to be quite sick.

I have done thorough inspections of both scopes when I received them, and I noticed something odd: the sweep board of the first parts scope (475) does NOT look like the sweep board on my father's 475, but it DOES look almost identical to the sweep board on the 475A, which makes me wonder if it might not actually be a 475A with the faceplate of a 475.

I pulled down the schematics for both the 475 and the 475A and compared their vertical amplifier sections, on the basis that a higher bandwidth scope would require upgrades to the vertical amplifiers. I also made a thorough assay of the part numbers for the PCBs and custom ICs in all three scopes, hoping to find some definitive evidence for which scopes were 475s and which were 475As. Sadly, aside from the layout of the sweep board, I have not found anything conclusive.

The collected information on the three scopes follows:

475, vintage 1974
vertical amp board PN 670-224-01 or GH-2780-01
- switch IC PN 155-0091
- 1st pre-amp IC PN 155-0085-01
- 2nd pre-amp IC PN 434-0078-02 / 437-0078-02
main board PN 670-2239-04 or GE-2779-01
trigger board PN 670-2241-03 or GH-2781-01
- sweep IC PN 155-0059-01
- trigger ICs PN 155-0032-01
sweep board PN 670-2244 or GI-2784-05

475/475A? vintage 1976
vertical amp board PN 670-2240-08 or GH-2780-01
- switch IC PN 155-0091-00
- 1st pre-amp IC PN 155-0085-10
- 2nd pre-amp IC PN 019-0078-10 / 936-0078-10
main board PN 670-2239 or GE-2779-01
trigger board PN 670-2241-03 or GE-2781-02
- sweep IC PN 155-0049-02
- trigger ICs PN 155-0217-00
sweep board PN ? or GD-3980-02

475A, vintage 1978
vertical amp board PN 670-2240 or GH-2780-01
- switch IC PN 155-0091-00
- 1st pre-amp IC PN 155-0085-01
- 2nd pre-amp IC PN 813-0098-03
main board PN 670-2239 or GF-2779-01
trigger board PN 670-2241-02 or GA-2781-02
- sweep IC PN 155-0049-02
- trigger IC PN 155-0032-01
sweep board PN ? GD-3990-02

There are also differences between the parts in the 3rd pre-amp, but I'm not sure what to make of them because the physical circuit on the boards differs significantly from the schematics and parts lists.

Are the 475 and 475A really just the same scope with a marketing upgrade? I know that Tek over-engineered their scopes, and that a 475 may well be able to handle signals up to (and beyond) 250 MHz, but I expected to find noticeable upgrades to the vertical amplifiers. I suppose that it's possible that my father's scope was upgraded in the field (that is, by Tek field service personnel, not by my father), but other such modifications have been accompanied by option indicators, and there are not such indicators in my father's scope.

Have I been looking in the wrong place for the modifications that would distinguish a 475 from a 475A?

Are there, in fact, no such modifications, and the 475A was merely a marketing upgrade?

How would I be able to tell if a scope had had its front panel swapped with another scope? Is the scope serial number recorded anywhere other than on the plate at the bottom of the front panel?

Thanks,

Jeff Dutky


Re: Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

toby@...
 

On 2020-11-19 4:41 p.m., Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:
These are a small fraction of the total number of Application Notes that were available from Tek. I accumulated this list because they have something to do with the 7000 Series of Scopes. This list was assembled from many different sources because they were of interest to me.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

Is the content accessible anywhere?

--Toby


22W-11230-4 Telephone Access Network Measurements
25M1.0 TDR for Cable Testing
26W-7071 EMI Applications Using the Tektronix 2712 Spectrum Analyzer
35J1.0 Jitter-Free Oscilloscope Displays of Disc File Data
42AX-2686-1 Measuring Memory Core I/O Signals with Digital Accuracy
42AX-2774-1 Why Use Display-by-Events in Your Measurement Applications?
42AX-3085 Using Storage to Find Troublesome Logic Glitches
42AX-3198 Variable Persistence Storage Applications
42AX-3199 Bistable Storage Applications
42AX-3200 Fast and Multimode Storage Applications
42AX-3379-1 Pulse and Digital Timing Measurements - A Better Technique
42AX-3957 X-Y Displays with Interval Timing for Measuring SOA
42AX-4194 World's Fastest Oscilloscope Breaks the 1GHz Barrier (article)
42AX-4682 Introduction to 7854 Oscilloscope Measurements and Programming Techniques
42W-2659-3 Accurate Radar Pulse Measurements Using Digital Delay
42W-2680-3 Measuring Time Interval Between Non-Adjacent Digital Word Pulses
42W-2687-2 Measuring Disc Drive Access Time and Access Voltages
42W-3632-2 DAC Measurements: The Sampling Oscilloscope Approach
42W-3681-1 Pulse-Echo Measurements with Digital Accuracy
42W-4281-1 Measurement Variety. An Engineering Challenge Featuring the 7854
42W-4416-1 Using the 7854 in a GPIB Configuration
42W-4935 Extending Waveform Measurement Capability with Special Purpose Plug-ins
42W-5017-1 Increased Measurement Accuracy Using a 7D15 Universal Counter/Timer in any 7000 Series Oscilloscope
42W-5079-1 7D20 Programmable Digitizer: Digitizing Performance and Versatility in a Powerful Plug-in
42W-5085 The 7D20 Programmable Digitizer: Performing a Wide Range of Measurement Tasks Easier, Faster, and More Accurately
42W-5195 Sampling for High Speed Measurements
42W-5311 Human Pattern Recognition Speeds Automated Testing (article)
42W-5314 Microchannel-plate CRT Added to Oscilloscope Speeds Fault Finding (article)
42W-5315 Storage Scopes: A Variety of Techniques and Capabilities (article)
42W-5325 Measurement Techniques with Differential Amplifiers
42W-5334-1 Automated TDR Testing Made Easy with the 7854 Oscilloscope / 7S12 Sampler Plug-in
42W-5335-1 Applying Photographic Writing Rate to High Speed Signal Measurements
42W-5588 Advanced Triggering Techniques
42W-5629 Viewing Low Amplitude Pulses
42W-5630 Displaying Bus Contention
42W-5645 Using Analog Sampling and Digital Storage to Improve ECL Testing (article)
42W-5646-1 Use a Personal Computer and DFT to Extract Data from Noisy Signals (article)
42W-5700 Power Supply / Device Testing
42W-5802 Basic Software Programs for Communicating between the 7854 and IBM PC
42W-5903 Logic-Triggered Amplifier Upgrades Oscilloscopes for Digital Troubleshooting (article)
42W-5918 The Evolution of Oscilloscopes: Faster Than Any Other Type of Test Equipment (article)
42W-5926 7854 Programming Primer
42W-5947 Storage Scopes Solve Tough Signal Capture Problems (article)
42W-5968 7854 Measurement Primer
42W-5969 Sampling Primer
44L1.0 The Boxcar Integrator
45W-5280 7D20 Instrument Interfacing Guide
52AX-3221 7844-400MHz/5444-60MHz - Low Repetition-Rate pulse Pairs and the Dual Beam Oscilloscope
61AX-4803 Performance Analysis
61AX-4804 The Family Emulator
61AX-4806 Interrupt Analysis
61AX-4807 Memory Allocation
99AX-4607 Tektronix Codes and Formats for GPIB Instruments
A-2495 Measuring Distortions in the Television Signal
A-2496, TV Products App Note #4 Remote TV Transmitter Monitoring with tektronix Television Equipment
A-2509, TV Products App Note #7 Picture Monitor Color Temperature Adjustment Using the Tektronix J16
A-2588 7000 Series Oscilloscope Systems (catalog), October 1972
A-2618 3 New Probes and LED Adapter
A-2661, TV Products App Note #5 Measuring Chrominance-To-Luminance Gain and Delay
A-2663-1, TV Products App Note #6 Monitoring and Interpreting the Vertical Interval Reference Signal
A-2719, TV Products App Note #8 Using the Vertical Interval Reference Signal
A-2772 TM 500 Series Application Notes #2. FG 501 Swept Frequency Applications
A-2786, TV Products App Note #8A TV Transmitter Precorrection with the Tektronix 1440
A2912 Practical Lighting Measurements with the Tektronix J16
A-2926 Picture Monitor Color Temperature Adjustment Using the Tektronix J16
A-2935 Rapid Scanning Spectrometer Sales Guide (Company Confidential)
A-3107 The Tektronix Cookbook of Standard Audio Tests
A-3107 The Tektronix CookBook of Standard Audio Tests
A-3183 TM 500 Modular Test and Measurement Instruments (catalog)
A-3186 Suggested TM 500 Power Supply Circuits
A-3263 16 Channel Logic Analyzer
A-3269 Easier, Faster, More Accurate Oscilloscope Timing Measurements
A-3341 Tektronix Logic Analyzers (for the Digital Domain) (Color Glossy Brochure)
A-3357-3 7D01 Data Sheet
AN-3266 AM Broadcast Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-2930, TV Products App Note #10 Chrominance to Luminance Gain Correction and Delay Measurements
AX-2932, 47N1.0 R7912 Transient Digitizer… A Solution to Pulse Laser Measurement Problems
AX-2933-1 Sideband Analysis for TV
AX-2936, 45A1.0 Mechanical Measurements Using the DPO
AX-2937, 45A1.1 Engine Performance Measurements
AX-2983 Pulsed Laser Measurements Using the R7912 Transient Digitizer
AX-3074, 30U1.1 Measurement of Color Coordinates with the Tek 7J20 Rapid-Scan Spectrometer System
AX-3145, 52G1.2 Troubleshooting a Logic Circuit
AX-3170, 60M1.0 X-Ray Tube Current Measurements
AX-3187, 45F1.0 DPO Program Library Techniques
AX-3217, 75M1.0 Generating Complex Waveforms with TM 500 Instruments
AX-3218, 75M2.0 Integration Through V to F Conversion
AX-3259-1 Noise Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer, Part 2: Impulse Noise
AX-3260 Noise Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer, Part 1: Random Noise
AX-3266 AM Broadcast Measurements using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3281 The Tracking Generator/Spectrum Analyzer System
AX-3323 Television Operational Measurements; Video and RF for NTSC Systems
AX-3336, 47L.0 Windowing to Control FFT Leakage
AX-3349, 41G1.0 Using Delayed Sweep in Measuring Digital Word Trains
AX-3388, TV Products App Note #23 Multiburst Testing with the 1470
AX-3406 EMI Applications Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3428, TV Products App Note #24 A Simple Color Background Generator
AX-3433 Baseband Measurements using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3492 Analyzing A/D Activity Through Mapping
AX-3524, 57K1.0 Troubleshooting a Microprocessor
AX-3535 Crystal Device Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3582-1 FM Broadcast Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3632, 42K1.0 DAC Measurements: The Sampling Oscilloscope Approach
AX-3682 The Spectrum Analyzer as a Frequency Selective Level Meter
AX-3810 Automating Swept RF Measurements
AX-3814 7D01 Logic Analyzer Laboratory Workbook
AX-3816 Tektronix Logic Analyzers Features Description and Glossary
AX-3903 Keeping Pace with Changing Needs in Optical Fiber Evaluation
AX-3999 Isolating Problems on GPIB
AX-4000 Detecting Data glitches Through Latching
AX-4006-1 An Introduction to Time and Frequency Domain Modulation and Waveform Analysis
AX-4012 Troubleshooting in the Synchronous & Asynchronous Modes
AX-4070 Simultaneous Display of Digital and Analog Test Data
AX-4098 Displaying I/O Address Activity Through Clock Qualification
AX-4117 Probing a CMOS Microcomputer Emulator
AX-4401 Capture Fast Waveforms Accurately with a 2-Channel Programmable Digitizer
AX-4416 GPIB Communication with the 7854
C. W. Rhodes, 1972 The 12.5T Modulated Sine-Squared pulse for NTSC (IEEE Trans. On Broadcasting Vol BC-18, #1, Mar. 1972)
C. W. Rhodes, 1972 Measuring Distortions in the television Signal
C. W. Rhodes, 1972 Test Signals and their Monitoring for Remote Control of Television Transmitters
Digital Family # 8 Logic Analysis Using Delay by Events Count
Internal Tek Application Note Application Note to Integrate the Area Under a Curve
TV Products App Note #1 Using the Tektronix 140, 144, or 146 as a VIT Signal Source
TV Products App Note #2 Measuring Luminance Cross Modulation with the Tektronix Types 140, 144, and 146
TV Products App Note #3 In-Service Random Noise Measurements Using the Tektronix 147
HANDSHAKE Application Library Catalog
The Logic Analyzer (Mini-Micro Systems, Sept. 1977)
What to Look for in Logic Timing Analyzers (magazine reprint)
Crack tough System problems With a Dual-Timebase Analyzer (EDN, Apr 28, 1983)
State Analyzers Move from Lab to Production Area (Electronic Design, May 13, 1982)
Clock Trigger Versatility Bolsters Logic Analysis (Electronic Design, Sept. 2, 1982)
Rapid Color Measurement (R/D magazine Nov. 1974
Rapid Scanning Spectrometry (American Laboratory, Nov. 1972)
Quality Control of the Color TV Signal (BM/E, Dec. 1969)
Get to Know Op Amps; Use a Curve Tracer (IEEE Spectrum, Vol 11, #9, Sept. 1978)
The Evolution of Scopes: Faster Than Any Other Type Of Test Equipment
Using the AA 501 and the SG 505 in Common Audio-Frequency Measurements
X-3585 Spectrum Analyzers / Swept Frequency Systems
Pulsed RF Spectrum Analysis
2EW-8190-0 The spectral connection.... Television RF measurements with the spectrum analyzer
063-0566-00 Television Measurements NTSC Systems
2EW-8380-0 Spectrum Analyzer Fundamentals

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Roy Thistle
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 9:47 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

For several decades, Tektronix has released these "Technical Briefs:" a.k.a. Technical Documents, Application Notes, and possibly other names.
Is there a single point(s) of curation for them?







LAST CALL for Peter Keller's Book and Current Orders I have

 

This is a last call for Peter Keller's fabulous book. I will accept orders
until Friday evening my time. At present I have orders for 75 books.
At that time I will publish the final list of people I have received an
order from and I will explain how to make payment.
Below are the people who have been placed on Peter's book order. Please
confirm your name is on this list.

If you have missed all of the excitement here is a summary
Pete Keller (from Tektronix) is prolific writer about cathode ray tubes and
many other kinds of display technologies.
He published a very detailed book on the subject in 1991 which I highly
recommend. The book title is:
"The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications", Peter A.
Keller. 320 p.
ISBN 0-9631559-0-3;
TK7871.73.K46;
621.3815'42-DC20

I paid $70 for my copy years ago when I bought it from Peter. There is a
copy of his book currently on eBay listed for $650!!!
Peter's book is still available in hard cover and he has copies of it to
sell to us.
Because of recent interest in it from TekScopes members I went out on a limb
and asked Peter if a discount would be available for our members if we
bought enough books to make it worth his while and if I did all the work for
him.
He agreed and offered our members a huge discount. The cost will be $30 +
shipping.
I am hoping I can even get him to autograph each copy.
I promised Peter I would keep his effort to an absolute minimum by
collecting the names and addresses, payments which I would send to him in
one lump sum; then when he ships all the books to me I will mail each book
for him.

The cost for a book going anywhere in the US is $30 + $4 Media Rate Postage
+ $3 for supplies and my time. The total will be $37.00.
The cost for orders overseas will be $30 + approximately $35 for Flat Rate
International Priority Mail (this includes tracking).

If you want a copy of Peter's book send your mailing address to me OFF-LIST
at dennis at ridesoft dot com. INCLUDE YOUR ADDRESS.

These are the orders I have as of 2:15PM (UTC-08:00) Coordinated Universal
Time-08.
If your name is not on this list then I missed your order (my apologies) so
resend it with your address.

UNITED STATES ORDERS
Eric Spendel Fairfield, OH 45014
Dave Daniel Mims, FL 32754
Chuck Azzalina Perkasie, PA 18944
Jean Paul Novato, CA 94947
Kurt Rosenfeld Ossining, NY 10562
Vince Vielhaber K8ZW Oxford, MI 48371
Stan Perkins N6BYU San Diego, CA 92109-2348
Bruce Lane Kent, WA 98030-8803
Mark Huffstutter Seattle, WA 98115
Joe Rigdon Oviedo, FL 32765
Jeffrey S. Dutky Silver Spring, MD 20901
Larry Snyder Springboro, OH 45066-9761
Byron Hayes Jr. WA6ATN Toluca Lake, CA 91602-2914
Michael Drum Fanwood, NJ 07023-1008
Jack Reynolds Howell, MI, 48843
Phil Erickson Clinton, MA 01510
Edward Oscarson New Hartford, CT 06057
Steve Berg Casselberry, FL 32707
Charles Daves Aurora, CO 80015-1422
Chuck Harris Damascus, MD 20872
John Malec IV Northglenn, CO 80234
Marvin Moss Marietta, GA 30064
Tom Norman Escalon, CA 95320
Bill Lavick WA2SMF Edwards, NY 13635
Jeff Frantzen Olathe, KS 66062-3693
Glenn Little Goose Creek, SC 29445
Mark Vincent N. Chesterfield, VA 23236
Lance Lieberman Albertson, NY 11507-1022
Steven Horii Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-1226
Charles Nalley Burien, WA 98166
Carl Miles Rio Rancho, NM 87124
Larry Schneider Otis, ME 04605-7652
Dennis McCreery Bellevue, WA 98008
Tim Laing Lima, OH 45801-4644
Chris Wilkson Detroit, MI 48206
Timothy Koeth Brandywine, MD 20613
John Griessen Albuquerque, NM 87107
Greg Muir Great Falls, MT 59405-3144
Kurt Swanson Wilton, CA 95693-9765
Bruce Gentry KA2IVY Mattydale, NY 13211
Peter Brown Broomfield, CO 80023
Tim Pierce Cottage Grove, OR 97424
Bob Darlington N3XKB Los Alamos, NM 87544
Hugh Vartanian Littleton, MA 01460
Richard Brittingham W4MCD Edenton, NC 27932
Jim Rawlings AF6VF Livermore, CA 94550
Monte Meredith Reno, NV 89511
Chris Loggans Haymarket, VA 20169
Steve Bates Concord, MA 01742
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Re: Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

 

These are a small fraction of the total number of Application Notes that were available from Tek. I accumulated this list because they have something to do with the 7000 Series of Scopes. This list was assembled from many different sources because they were of interest to me.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

22W-11230-4 Telephone Access Network Measurements
25M1.0 TDR for Cable Testing
26W-7071 EMI Applications Using the Tektronix 2712 Spectrum Analyzer
35J1.0 Jitter-Free Oscilloscope Displays of Disc File Data
42AX-2686-1 Measuring Memory Core I/O Signals with Digital Accuracy
42AX-2774-1 Why Use Display-by-Events in Your Measurement Applications?
42AX-3085 Using Storage to Find Troublesome Logic Glitches
42AX-3198 Variable Persistence Storage Applications
42AX-3199 Bistable Storage Applications
42AX-3200 Fast and Multimode Storage Applications
42AX-3379-1 Pulse and Digital Timing Measurements - A Better Technique
42AX-3957 X-Y Displays with Interval Timing for Measuring SOA
42AX-4194 World's Fastest Oscilloscope Breaks the 1GHz Barrier (article)
42AX-4682 Introduction to 7854 Oscilloscope Measurements and Programming Techniques
42W-2659-3 Accurate Radar Pulse Measurements Using Digital Delay
42W-2680-3 Measuring Time Interval Between Non-Adjacent Digital Word Pulses
42W-2687-2 Measuring Disc Drive Access Time and Access Voltages
42W-3632-2 DAC Measurements: The Sampling Oscilloscope Approach
42W-3681-1 Pulse-Echo Measurements with Digital Accuracy
42W-4281-1 Measurement Variety. An Engineering Challenge Featuring the 7854
42W-4416-1 Using the 7854 in a GPIB Configuration
42W-4935 Extending Waveform Measurement Capability with Special Purpose Plug-ins
42W-5017-1 Increased Measurement Accuracy Using a 7D15 Universal Counter/Timer in any 7000 Series Oscilloscope
42W-5079-1 7D20 Programmable Digitizer: Digitizing Performance and Versatility in a Powerful Plug-in
42W-5085 The 7D20 Programmable Digitizer: Performing a Wide Range of Measurement Tasks Easier, Faster, and More Accurately
42W-5195 Sampling for High Speed Measurements
42W-5311 Human Pattern Recognition Speeds Automated Testing (article)
42W-5314 Microchannel-plate CRT Added to Oscilloscope Speeds Fault Finding (article)
42W-5315 Storage Scopes: A Variety of Techniques and Capabilities (article)
42W-5325 Measurement Techniques with Differential Amplifiers
42W-5334-1 Automated TDR Testing Made Easy with the 7854 Oscilloscope / 7S12 Sampler Plug-in
42W-5335-1 Applying Photographic Writing Rate to High Speed Signal Measurements
42W-5588 Advanced Triggering Techniques
42W-5629 Viewing Low Amplitude Pulses
42W-5630 Displaying Bus Contention
42W-5645 Using Analog Sampling and Digital Storage to Improve ECL Testing (article)
42W-5646-1 Use a Personal Computer and DFT to Extract Data from Noisy Signals (article)
42W-5700 Power Supply / Device Testing
42W-5802 Basic Software Programs for Communicating between the 7854 and IBM PC
42W-5903 Logic-Triggered Amplifier Upgrades Oscilloscopes for Digital Troubleshooting (article)
42W-5918 The Evolution of Oscilloscopes: Faster Than Any Other Type of Test Equipment (article)
42W-5926 7854 Programming Primer
42W-5947 Storage Scopes Solve Tough Signal Capture Problems (article)
42W-5968 7854 Measurement Primer
42W-5969 Sampling Primer
44L1.0 The Boxcar Integrator
45W-5280 7D20 Instrument Interfacing Guide
52AX-3221 7844-400MHz/5444-60MHz - Low Repetition-Rate pulse Pairs and the Dual Beam Oscilloscope
61AX-4803 Performance Analysis
61AX-4804 The Family Emulator
61AX-4806 Interrupt Analysis
61AX-4807 Memory Allocation
99AX-4607 Tektronix Codes and Formats for GPIB Instruments
A-2495 Measuring Distortions in the Television Signal
A-2496, TV Products App Note #4 Remote TV Transmitter Monitoring with tektronix Television Equipment
A-2509, TV Products App Note #7 Picture Monitor Color Temperature Adjustment Using the Tektronix J16
A-2588 7000 Series Oscilloscope Systems (catalog), October 1972
A-2618 3 New Probes and LED Adapter
A-2661, TV Products App Note #5 Measuring Chrominance-To-Luminance Gain and Delay
A-2663-1, TV Products App Note #6 Monitoring and Interpreting the Vertical Interval Reference Signal
A-2719, TV Products App Note #8 Using the Vertical Interval Reference Signal
A-2772 TM 500 Series Application Notes #2. FG 501 Swept Frequency Applications
A-2786, TV Products App Note #8A TV Transmitter Precorrection with the Tektronix 1440
A2912 Practical Lighting Measurements with the Tektronix J16
A-2926 Picture Monitor Color Temperature Adjustment Using the Tektronix J16
A-2935 Rapid Scanning Spectrometer Sales Guide (Company Confidential)
A-3107 The Tektronix Cookbook of Standard Audio Tests
A-3107 The Tektronix CookBook of Standard Audio Tests
A-3183 TM 500 Modular Test and Measurement Instruments (catalog)
A-3186 Suggested TM 500 Power Supply Circuits
A-3263 16 Channel Logic Analyzer
A-3269 Easier, Faster, More Accurate Oscilloscope Timing Measurements
A-3341 Tektronix Logic Analyzers (for the Digital Domain) (Color Glossy Brochure)
A-3357-3 7D01 Data Sheet
AN-3266 AM Broadcast Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-2930, TV Products App Note #10 Chrominance to Luminance Gain Correction and Delay Measurements
AX-2932, 47N1.0 R7912 Transient Digitizer… A Solution to Pulse Laser Measurement Problems
AX-2933-1 Sideband Analysis for TV
AX-2936, 45A1.0 Mechanical Measurements Using the DPO
AX-2937, 45A1.1 Engine Performance Measurements
AX-2983 Pulsed Laser Measurements Using the R7912 Transient Digitizer
AX-3074, 30U1.1 Measurement of Color Coordinates with the Tek 7J20 Rapid-Scan Spectrometer System
AX-3145, 52G1.2 Troubleshooting a Logic Circuit
AX-3170, 60M1.0 X-Ray Tube Current Measurements
AX-3187, 45F1.0 DPO Program Library Techniques
AX-3217, 75M1.0 Generating Complex Waveforms with TM 500 Instruments
AX-3218, 75M2.0 Integration Through V to F Conversion
AX-3259-1 Noise Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer, Part 2: Impulse Noise
AX-3260 Noise Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer, Part 1: Random Noise
AX-3266 AM Broadcast Measurements using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3281 The Tracking Generator/Spectrum Analyzer System
AX-3323 Television Operational Measurements; Video and RF for NTSC Systems
AX-3336, 47L.0 Windowing to Control FFT Leakage
AX-3349, 41G1.0 Using Delayed Sweep in Measuring Digital Word Trains
AX-3388, TV Products App Note #23 Multiburst Testing with the 1470
AX-3406 EMI Applications Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3428, TV Products App Note #24 A Simple Color Background Generator
AX-3433 Baseband Measurements using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3492 Analyzing A/D Activity Through Mapping
AX-3524, 57K1.0 Troubleshooting a Microprocessor
AX-3535 Crystal Device Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3582-1 FM Broadcast Measurements Using the Spectrum Analyzer
AX-3632, 42K1.0 DAC Measurements: The Sampling Oscilloscope Approach
AX-3682 The Spectrum Analyzer as a Frequency Selective Level Meter
AX-3810 Automating Swept RF Measurements
AX-3814 7D01 Logic Analyzer Laboratory Workbook
AX-3816 Tektronix Logic Analyzers Features Description and Glossary
AX-3903 Keeping Pace with Changing Needs in Optical Fiber Evaluation
AX-3999 Isolating Problems on GPIB
AX-4000 Detecting Data glitches Through Latching
AX-4006-1 An Introduction to Time and Frequency Domain Modulation and Waveform Analysis
AX-4012 Troubleshooting in the Synchronous & Asynchronous Modes
AX-4070 Simultaneous Display of Digital and Analog Test Data
AX-4098 Displaying I/O Address Activity Through Clock Qualification
AX-4117 Probing a CMOS Microcomputer Emulator
AX-4401 Capture Fast Waveforms Accurately with a 2-Channel Programmable Digitizer
AX-4416 GPIB Communication with the 7854
C. W. Rhodes, 1972 The 12.5T Modulated Sine-Squared pulse for NTSC (IEEE Trans. On Broadcasting Vol BC-18, #1, Mar. 1972)
C. W. Rhodes, 1972 Measuring Distortions in the television Signal
C. W. Rhodes, 1972 Test Signals and their Monitoring for Remote Control of Television Transmitters
Digital Family # 8 Logic Analysis Using Delay by Events Count
Internal Tek Application Note Application Note to Integrate the Area Under a Curve
TV Products App Note #1 Using the Tektronix 140, 144, or 146 as a VIT Signal Source
TV Products App Note #2 Measuring Luminance Cross Modulation with the Tektronix Types 140, 144, and 146
TV Products App Note #3 In-Service Random Noise Measurements Using the Tektronix 147
HANDSHAKE Application Library Catalog
The Logic Analyzer (Mini-Micro Systems, Sept. 1977)
What to Look for in Logic Timing Analyzers (magazine reprint)
Crack tough System problems With a Dual-Timebase Analyzer (EDN, Apr 28, 1983)
State Analyzers Move from Lab to Production Area (Electronic Design, May 13, 1982)
Clock Trigger Versatility Bolsters Logic Analysis (Electronic Design, Sept. 2, 1982)
Rapid Color Measurement (R/D magazine Nov. 1974
Rapid Scanning Spectrometry (American Laboratory, Nov. 1972)
Quality Control of the Color TV Signal (BM/E, Dec. 1969)
Get to Know Op Amps; Use a Curve Tracer (IEEE Spectrum, Vol 11, #9, Sept. 1978)
The Evolution of Scopes: Faster Than Any Other Type Of Test Equipment
Using the AA 501 and the SG 505 in Common Audio-Frequency Measurements
X-3585 Spectrum Analyzers / Swept Frequency Systems
Pulsed RF Spectrum Analysis
2EW-8190-0 The spectral connection.... Television RF measurements with the spectrum analyzer
063-0566-00 Television Measurements NTSC Systems
2EW-8380-0 Spectrum Analyzer Fundamentals

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Roy Thistle
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 9:47 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

For several decades, Tektronix has released these "Technical Briefs:" a.k.a. Technical Documents, Application Notes, and possibly other names.
Is there a single point(s) of curation for them?







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

 

Hi Roy,
In the 1970s and 1980s they were known generically as Application Notes. Tek changed their numbering system several times for various reasons.
* In some cases they were published by the group that created the instruments (Spectrum Analyzer articles came from that group for instance).
* In some cases they were created by the marketing person for a particular product line (like the TM500 instruments).
* In some cases they were created by a separate division of Tek (like the TV Instruments, or Laboratory Scopes divisions).
* In some cases they were articles written for trade publications which Tek had permission to reprint.
* Some excellent articles were written for Tek Periodicals such as Service Scope, Handshake, etc.
As if that wasn't confusing enough the same Application Notes were printed with different numbering systems when Tek tried to place all of these things under one group within the company.

So to answer your question: There is no rhyme or reason for how Tek did it.

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Roy Thistle
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2020 9:47 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

For several decades, Tektronix has released these "Technical Briefs:" a.k.a. Technical Documents, Application Notes, and possibly other names.
Is there a single point(s) of curation for them?







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


Tektronix Technical Briefs (or whatever they're called in 2020)

Roy Thistle
 

For several decades, Tektronix has released these "Technical Briefs:" a.k.a. Technical Documents, Application Notes, and possibly other names.
Is there a single point(s) of curation for them?


Re: “High Bandwidth Transient Capture,” Tektronix Publication 1991

Roy Thistle
 

High Bandwidth Transient Capture, Technical Brief No: 45W-8088, Tektronics circa (1991?)

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