Date   

Tektronix Type 555 Dual Beam Oscilloscope

Bill Higdon
 


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

greenboxmaven
 

Tektronix made color studio video monitors that used Sony Trinitron jugs. In good condition and properly set up, the picture is excellent.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 11/16/20 12:43 PM, n4buq wrote:
Hi Tom,

My question is probably quite simple but, like I said, I'm not finding a good answer.

As I understand it (and from personal observation when I had a Trinitron TV and I'm primarily wondering about this type of CRT ........
(Hope that made sense...)

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Lee" <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:27:46 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,

Pete's book mainly covers electrostatically deflected crts. Except for
some very early models, TVs used magnetically deflected crts (to allow
large screens without absurd set depths). The guns are similar, but the
deflection methods are very different because of the different
optimization objectives.

--Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/16/2020 07:18, n4buq wrote:
Does anyone know whether this book covers CRTs that were used for color TVs
(and other color displays)? I ask because I'm not finding good
information on how those work.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 12:15:11 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

Hi Chris,
I don't expect any problems shipping this to Germany.

One correction:
This offer is strictly between Peter Keller and individual members of the
group. I did offer to act as the go-between because I thought there might
be
some interest and because I understood how "sensitive" our members are to
price. I was also hoping this would give Peter some well-deserved cash as
we
get close to the holidays.

So I told Peter I thought I might be able to pass along 10 orders for his
book. When he said OK I notified TekScopes. That was 36 hours ago. I have
orders for over 50 of his books as of this moment.

This brings back memories of when I asked for small donations to pay
Groups.io the annual fee for hosting TekScopes back at the beginning of
the
year. Somebody please remind me the next time I think up something like
this
to think twice about what happened the last two times I had a bright idea.
:)

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
ChrisBeee
via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:47 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Dennis,
I would be more than glad if I could support the group buy and get a copy
of
Peter's book, many thanks for making this possible! My only concern is if
you would ship to Germany too. I will send you a PM with my contact data.
Cheers
Chris







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator













Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Harvey White
 

The guns are indeed the same.  The electrons are the same. However, the shadow mask is the key.  The guns are in a triangle. If each gun were aimed at the exact surface of the screen, then each beam would hit the same spot.  However, the actual point where the beams are focused is a little inside where the phosphor is, so the three beams would cross, and then diverge.  Think three chopsticks making a very small triangle, crossing, and then diverging to the guns.

If you put a mask (with a hole in it at exactly the intersection of the three beams, they get narrowed.  The beam coming through the shadow mask hits a different color phosphor depending on which gun sends out the beam.

It's all in the angles.

Harvey

On 11/16/2020 3:56 PM, n4buq wrote:
Hi Dennis,

I had been to that page yesterday and I didn't quite understand some of it. Particularly, the following image wasn't helping that much.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube#/media/File:CRT_color_enhanced.png

The reason being that they "paint" the color guns as if they're somehow controlling what color the phosphor will be when, in fact, that was just for clarification to show that the "red" gun was being aimed (through the hole in the mask) at the red phosphor, the "blue" gun at the blue phosphor, and the "green" gun at the green phosphor. The guns are all the same and it is only the phosphor that's different and that was what I was wondering. Perhaps a silly question but it was confusing me nonetheless. I understand it now (actually, Tom Lee helped explain it via a PM).

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 2:38:24 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,
As with so many things there is an excellent explanation on Wikipedia of
shadow mask and Trinitron tubes and how they work. It is at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube.
Scroll down to the section I am referring to. No magic is involved, just a
shadow mask.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of n4buq
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 9:43 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Tom,

My question is probably quite simple but, like I said, I'm not finding a good
answer.

As I understand it (and from personal observation when I had a Trinitron TV
and I'm primarily wondering about this type of CRT but the question probably
applies to others), the screen has groupings of RBG phospher dots and the
RGB guns "activate" those dots as needed; however, what I'm not
understanding is how a given gun "activates" a given dot. Is a particular
phosphor dot sensitive to a property of one of the color guns such that a
blue dot ignores a red gun, etc.? If so, then I can somewhat understand it
but I'm wondering if I'm way off in that assumption.

The various sites just seem to indicate there are three guns, each of which
magically cause a given color to appear but it's not explained how a single
color gun causes a corresponding dot to glow without affecting the ones
around it.

(Hope that made sense...)

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Lee" <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:27:46 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,

Pete's book mainly covers electrostatically deflected crts. Except for
some very early models, TVs used magnetically deflected crts (to allow
large screens without absurd set depths). The guns are similar, but
the deflection methods are very different because of the different
optimization objectives.

--Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/16/2020 07:18, n4buq wrote:
Does anyone know whether this book covers CRTs that were used for
color TVs (and other color displays)? I ask because I'm not finding
good information on how those work.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 12:15:11 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and
Applications"

Hi Chris,
I don't expect any problems shipping this to Germany.

One correction:
This offer is strictly between Peter Keller and individual members
of the group. I did offer to act as the go-between because I
thought there might be some interest and because I understood how
"sensitive" our members are to price. I was also hoping this would
give Peter some well-deserved cash as we get close to the holidays.

So I told Peter I thought I might be able to pass along 10 orders
for his book. When he said OK I notified TekScopes. That was 36
hours ago. I have orders for over 50 of his books as of this moment.

This brings back memories of when I asked for small donations to
pay Groups.io the annual fee for hosting TekScopes back at the
beginning of the year. Somebody please remind me the next time I
think up something like this to think twice about what happened the
last two times I had a bright idea.
:)

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
ChrisBeee via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:47 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Dennis,
I would be more than glad if I could support the group buy and get
a copy of Peter's book, many thanks for making this possible! My
only concern is if you would ship to Germany too. I will send you a
PM with my contact data.
Cheers
Chris







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator















--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator








Tektronix 7D13 and 7A42 wanted

Sparky99
 

Hi everyone, I'm searching for the above in good condition - if you have one for sale please let me know. I'm based in Switzerland, so prefer Europe but am also open to paying postage from US if I can't find anything closer to home.

Cheers

Sparky


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

snapdiode
 

Well, really, a shadow mask uses the parallax effect.


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

n4buq
 

Hi Dennis,

I had been to that page yesterday and I didn't quite understand some of it. Particularly, the following image wasn't helping that much.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube#/media/File:CRT_color_enhanced.png

The reason being that they "paint" the color guns as if they're somehow controlling what color the phosphor will be when, in fact, that was just for clarification to show that the "red" gun was being aimed (through the hole in the mask) at the red phosphor, the "blue" gun at the blue phosphor, and the "green" gun at the green phosphor. The guns are all the same and it is only the phosphor that's different and that was what I was wondering. Perhaps a silly question but it was confusing me nonetheless. I understand it now (actually, Tom Lee helped explain it via a PM).

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 2:38:24 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,
As with so many things there is an excellent explanation on Wikipedia of
shadow mask and Trinitron tubes and how they work. It is at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube.
Scroll down to the section I am referring to. No magic is involved, just a
shadow mask.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of n4buq
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 9:43 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Tom,

My question is probably quite simple but, like I said, I'm not finding a good
answer.

As I understand it (and from personal observation when I had a Trinitron TV
and I'm primarily wondering about this type of CRT but the question probably
applies to others), the screen has groupings of RBG phospher dots and the
RGB guns "activate" those dots as needed; however, what I'm not
understanding is how a given gun "activates" a given dot. Is a particular
phosphor dot sensitive to a property of one of the color guns such that a
blue dot ignores a red gun, etc.? If so, then I can somewhat understand it
but I'm wondering if I'm way off in that assumption.

The various sites just seem to indicate there are three guns, each of which
magically cause a given color to appear but it's not explained how a single
color gun causes a corresponding dot to glow without affecting the ones
around it.

(Hope that made sense...)

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Lee" <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:27:46 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,

Pete's book mainly covers electrostatically deflected crts. Except for
some very early models, TVs used magnetically deflected crts (to allow
large screens without absurd set depths). The guns are similar, but
the deflection methods are very different because of the different
optimization objectives.

--Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/16/2020 07:18, n4buq wrote:
Does anyone know whether this book covers CRTs that were used for
color TVs (and other color displays)? I ask because I'm not finding
good information on how those work.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 12:15:11 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and
Applications"

Hi Chris,
I don't expect any problems shipping this to Germany.

One correction:
This offer is strictly between Peter Keller and individual members
of the group. I did offer to act as the go-between because I
thought there might be some interest and because I understood how
"sensitive" our members are to price. I was also hoping this would
give Peter some well-deserved cash as we get close to the holidays.

So I told Peter I thought I might be able to pass along 10 orders
for his book. When he said OK I notified TekScopes. That was 36
hours ago. I have orders for over 50 of his books as of this moment.

This brings back memories of when I asked for small donations to
pay Groups.io the annual fee for hosting TekScopes back at the
beginning of the year. Somebody please remind me the next time I
think up something like this to think twice about what happened the
last two times I had a bright idea.
:)

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
ChrisBeee via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:47 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Dennis,
I would be more than glad if I could support the group buy and get
a copy of Peter's book, many thanks for making this possible! My
only concern is if you would ship to Germany too. I will send you a
PM with my contact data.
Cheers
Chris







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


















--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator






Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

stevenhorii
 

In the days of color CRTs for television, I knew a guy who worked in a
broadcast studio. Though Trinitron displays (Tektronix made a display
monitor that used a Trinitron CRT) were used in the control room of the
studio, he said that they also had a conventional triangular dot shadow
mask monitor as that was what most home TVs used and they wanted to be sure
that the broadcast image looked as good on the triangle shadow mask monitor
as it did on the Trinitron ones. Whether or not this is true, I don't know.

Steve H.

On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 3:38 PM Dennis Tillman W7pF <dennis@ridesoft.com>
wrote:

Hi Barry,
As with so many things there is an excellent explanation on Wikipedia of
shadow mask and Trinitron tubes and how they work. It is at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube.
Scroll down to the section I am referring to. No magic is involved, just a
shadow mask.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of n4buq
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 9:43 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Tom,

My question is probably quite simple but, like I said, I'm not finding a
good answer.

As I understand it (and from personal observation when I had a Trinitron
TV and I'm primarily wondering about this type of CRT but the question
probably applies to others), the screen has groupings of RBG phospher dots
and the RGB guns "activate" those dots as needed; however, what I'm not
understanding is how a given gun "activates" a given dot. Is a particular
phosphor dot sensitive to a property of one of the color guns such that a
blue dot ignores a red gun, etc.? If so, then I can somewhat understand it
but I'm wondering if I'm way off in that assumption.

The various sites just seem to indicate there are three guns, each of
which magically cause a given color to appear but it's not explained how a
single color gun causes a corresponding dot to glow without affecting the
ones around it.

(Hope that made sense...)

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Lee" <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:27:46 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,

Pete's book mainly covers electrostatically deflected crts. Except for
some very early models, TVs used magnetically deflected crts (to allow
large screens without absurd set depths). The guns are similar, but
the deflection methods are very different because of the different
optimization objectives.

--Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/16/2020 07:18, n4buq wrote:
Does anyone know whether this book covers CRTs that were used for
color TVs (and other color displays)? I ask because I'm not finding
good information on how those work.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 12:15:11 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and
Applications"

Hi Chris,
I don't expect any problems shipping this to Germany.

One correction:
This offer is strictly between Peter Keller and individual members
of the group. I did offer to act as the go-between because I
thought there might be some interest and because I understood how
"sensitive" our members are to price. I was also hoping this would
give Peter some well-deserved cash as we get close to the holidays.

So I told Peter I thought I might be able to pass along 10 orders
for his book. When he said OK I notified TekScopes. That was 36
hours ago. I have orders for over 50 of his books as of this moment.

This brings back memories of when I asked for small donations to
pay Groups.io the annual fee for hosting TekScopes back at the
beginning of the year. Somebody please remind me the next time I
think up something like this to think twice about what happened the
last two times I had a bright idea.
:)

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
ChrisBeee via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:47 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Dennis,
I would be more than glad if I could support the group buy and get
a copy of Peter's book, many thanks for making this possible! My
only concern is if you would ship to Germany too. I will send you a
PM with my contact data.
Cheers
Chris







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


















--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator






Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

 

Hi Barry,
As with so many things there is an excellent explanation on Wikipedia of shadow mask and Trinitron tubes and how they work. It is at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathode-ray_tube.
Scroll down to the section I am referring to. No magic is involved, just a shadow mask.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of n4buq
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 9:43 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Tom,

My question is probably quite simple but, like I said, I'm not finding a good answer.

As I understand it (and from personal observation when I had a Trinitron TV and I'm primarily wondering about this type of CRT but the question probably applies to others), the screen has groupings of RBG phospher dots and the RGB guns "activate" those dots as needed; however, what I'm not understanding is how a given gun "activates" a given dot. Is a particular phosphor dot sensitive to a property of one of the color guns such that a blue dot ignores a red gun, etc.? If so, then I can somewhat understand it but I'm wondering if I'm way off in that assumption.

The various sites just seem to indicate there are three guns, each of which magically cause a given color to appear but it's not explained how a single color gun causes a corresponding dot to glow without affecting the ones around it.

(Hope that made sense...)

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Lee" <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:27:46 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,

Pete's book mainly covers electrostatically deflected crts. Except for
some very early models, TVs used magnetically deflected crts (to allow
large screens without absurd set depths). The guns are similar, but
the deflection methods are very different because of the different
optimization objectives.

--Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/16/2020 07:18, n4buq wrote:
Does anyone know whether this book covers CRTs that were used for
color TVs (and other color displays)? I ask because I'm not finding
good information on how those work.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 12:15:11 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and
Applications"

Hi Chris,
I don't expect any problems shipping this to Germany.

One correction:
This offer is strictly between Peter Keller and individual members
of the group. I did offer to act as the go-between because I
thought there might be some interest and because I understood how
"sensitive" our members are to price. I was also hoping this would
give Peter some well-deserved cash as we get close to the holidays.

So I told Peter I thought I might be able to pass along 10 orders
for his book. When he said OK I notified TekScopes. That was 36
hours ago. I have orders for over 50 of his books as of this moment.

This brings back memories of when I asked for small donations to
pay Groups.io the annual fee for hosting TekScopes back at the
beginning of the year. Somebody please remind me the next time I
think up something like this to think twice about what happened the
last two times I had a bright idea.
:)

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
ChrisBeee via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:47 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to
TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Dennis,
I would be more than glad if I could support the group buy and get
a copy of Peter's book, many thanks for making this possible! My
only concern is if you would ship to Germany too. I will send you a
PM with my contact data.
Cheers
Chris







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


















--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Byron Hayes, Jr.
 

Dennis,

I agree with Larry, and my thanks to you for moderating this group and having good ideas.

Byron WA6ATN

At 10:42 AM 11/16/2020, Lawrance A. Schneider wrote:
On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 01:15 AM, Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:


Somebody please remind me the next time I think up something like this to
think twice about what happened the last two times I had a bright idea. :)
I realize it is work for you, but I hope you 'think up' something again.

Thanks you, larry



Re: Tek 577 D1 storage adjustment questions.

Eric
 

From having been through the adjustment process. I can say the dimmer tube that I have the brightness control does not appear to do anything for the over all brightness of the tube. I have checked the transistors in the oscillator circuit and they test ok. No further troubleshooting has been done yet. From that I have been able to gleen from the manuals is when you ordered a tube from tek it came with a card that said set the voltages to “this” and those seem to be unique to each tube and were established at the factory. So I am not sure what the manufacture tolerances were. I would have to assume that the storage functionality works the same as it did with the scope tubes. Though the curve tracers are a REALLY low bandwidth tube >2Mhz on mine the brightness does have an effect. At full brightness with a comfortable trace intensity the tube will store. At low brightness the trace will only store around the edges. The history of this tracer is odd. It has been doodled on the front with settings like b.p and a few other terms. It also has a “hospital” grade plug on the end the cord was cut and a different plug attached. So I believe that the unit was used in some thing medical or bio med but for the life of me I have no idea what it would have been monitoring especially at 100 V/div and 350 VDC collector.

If a video of the units side by side would help let me know and I can get one posted.

On 11/16/2020 12:48 PM, Dave Voorhis wrote:
On 16 Nov 2020, at 17:08, Eric <ericsp@gmail.com> wrote:

I am working on some 577’s D1 storage curve tracers. I am trying to get a 178 working. So I need the storage tubes up and running. I do not have much experience with storage tubes hence the noob question. I think one of these units has been miss adjusted pretty badly, my problem Is I do not know which one. When I do the 6 minute startup as called for in the manual both units will get some glow bloom on the tubes. One is far dimmer then the other but both tubes have really good brightness so I do not believe that it is a tired tube. If I hit erase on both tubes they will blank as expected but the bright one will again go to full glow. At the full brightness the tube will not actually store anything as it looks like the glow is too bright. On the dimmer tube after the initial power up the tube will not bloom any more in storage mod and it will store a waveform however the “brightness control” must be all the way up. At minimum storage brightness it will store but it will only store at the edges.

So having minimal exposure to storage tubes is this normal behavior or is one or both miss adjusted? I can take some pictures if it will help. In the service manual it talks about adjusting the tubes but it does not say where the brightness control should be during the adjustment curious if anyone has insight on that as well.
I have a 577 D1 which is rather similar to your dimmer tube. It originally had an obviously failing CRT — dim to barely visible in non-store mode and double-peaking — but storage mode worked surprisingly well despite the dim trace.

I replaced the CRT with a used spare that came with the curve tracer. Now it’s bright and sharp in non-store mode but despite multiple attempts at tuning the storage settings per the service manual, it will only store if the intensity is turned up to be uncomfortably bright and the brightness control doesn’t appear to affect storage sensitivity, only the brightness of a stored trace.

I suspect either the replacement CRT has worn-out storage gubbins or is in some manner mismatched to the drive circuitry, or I’ve somehow repeatedly failed to correctly follow the service manual instructions.

Sorry, that’s obviously no help at all, but I’m hoping someone will chime in with knowledge that will help both of us.




Re: Replacing cable on P6075A probe

Brent W8XG
 

Jeff, your probe is a 200mhz unit. I re-cabled a p6062 which is a 100mhz. However they appear similar and I expect are built about the same.

I had a break. I cut the cable at both ends. There is a strain relief fitting, and I used a small Dremel drill to remove the extra material. Then I went to work on the cable. The probe wire is the finest, smallest wire I've ever see. It took some time and was quite tedious. But I got it done. It was a couple of hours. Also, mine is a 1x/10x switchable probe. There is a very fine wire (not as fine as the probe) on the outside of the coax, to the switch, that switches in/out the 11K resistor, to the scope changing to the correct vertical display. Your probe has the readout pin on the bnc connector. It goes to that 11k resistor so the scope switches vertical values.

I've got another probe also with a readout pin, but apparently the wire to the resistor, or the switch is broken, so the scope doesn't switch. I've also got several probes without the readout pin. So, I put together a little washer looking device that I've called a TekRing, that slips onto the BNC to tell the scope what value your probe is. It spoofs the scope to the right value. I've got a little website http://tekring.net/ that discusses this.

Good luck.. You need a good set of magnifying glass, to see that little wire. But it's worth fixing, in my opinion.


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Jack Reynolds
 

Dennis,

Just think of yourself as the poster boy for "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished!"  Let me add my thanks for the many good deeds.

Jack

On 11/16/2020 1:42 PM, Lawrance A. Schneider wrote:
On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 01:15 AM, Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:

Somebody please remind me the next time I think up something like this to
think twice about what happened the last two times I had a bright idea. :)
I realize it is work for you, but I hope you 'think up' something again.

Thanks you, larry




Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Geoffrey Thomas
 

Trinitron page here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinitron

Geoff.

On 16/11/2020 18:39, Stephen Hanselman wrote:
I don’t have hard knowledge of that but the big deal about Trinitron wasn't the mask. It was the fact that there was only one electron gun and some pretty intricate electronic stuff done to emulate the three-gun standard color tubes. The benefit was overcoming the very difficult task of keeping the three gun cluster aligned in manufacture.
I can also say from experience if you don't feel real confident and have detailed instructions and test equipment don't try to align a Trinitron. The 9845 color head was one of the best it had a very nice calibration program built in
Steve
-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of snapdiode via groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 9:59 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"
I'm a bit confused about the Trinitron having "dots", the Trinitron relies on stripes and the mask is an aperture grille.


Re: Replacing cable on P6075A probe

Colin Herbert
 

Jeff, take a look in TekWiki for the manual for the P6075A probe.

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/P6075

It gives details of cable replacement. If you are not already aware, TekWiki is nearly always the first place to look, though sometimes it won't have what you want - in this case it does.
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeff Dutky
Sent: 16 November 2020 18:27
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Replacing cable on P6075A probe

I have a P6075A that appears to have a break in the middle of the coax cable, and I also have a replacement cable assembly.

How difficult is the process of replacing the cable on one of these probes?

Does anybody have instructions on how to do such a thing?

Thanks
-- Jeff Dutky


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Lawrance A. Schneider
 

On Mon, Nov 16, 2020 at 01:15 AM, Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:


Somebody please remind me the next time I think up something like this to
think twice about what happened the last two times I had a bright idea. :)
I realize it is work for you, but I hope you 'think up' something again.

Thanks you, larry


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Stephen Hanselman
 

I don’t have hard knowledge of that but the big deal about Trinitron wasn't the mask. It was the fact that there was only one electron gun and some pretty intricate electronic stuff done to emulate the three-gun standard color tubes. The benefit was overcoming the very difficult task of keeping the three gun cluster aligned in manufacture.

I can also say from experience if you don't feel real confident and have detailed instructions and test equipment don't try to align a Trinitron. The 9845 color head was one of the best it had a very nice calibration program built in

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of snapdiode via groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 9:59 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

I'm a bit confused about the Trinitron having "dots", the Trinitron relies on stripes and the mask is an aperture grille.


Replacing cable on P6075A probe

 

I have a P6075A that appears to have a break in the middle of the coax cable, and I also have a replacement cable assembly.

How difficult is the process of replacing the cable on one of these probes?

Does anybody have instructions on how to do such a thing?

Thanks
-- Jeff Dutky


Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

n4buq
 

I may be misremembering that. I recall looking at a color display and seeing the dots but that may not have been my Trinitron. Sorry for the confusion.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "snapdiode via groups.io" <snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:58:35 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

I'm a bit confused about the Trinitron having "dots", the Trinitron relies on
stripes and the mask is an aperture grille.






Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

The trinitron works in much the same way as the shadow mask
CRT's, with their triangular gun orientation, that GE and others
developed.

The major difference is the trinitron uses a common gun, with three
horizontally spaced, cathodes.... one for each of the red, blue, and
green phosphor colors.

At the screen is a grill made up of high tension parallel wires that
go from the top of the screen to the bottom. There is usually a couple
of wires welded horizontally at various placements to keep the high
tension wires from vibrating much.

The common gun has three horizontally spaced RGB cathodes, and the
alignment of the beams is arranged so that they travel at slightly
different angles, converging at the slots formed by the high tension
shadow mask wires.

Any beam that can pass through a slot between the wires can only illuminate
the appropriate stripe of color phosphor. When it is in a position where
it could illuminate a wrong phosphor color, it is blocked by the shadow
wire.

-Chuck Harris

n4buq wrote:

Hi Tom,

My question is probably quite simple but, like I said, I'm not finding a good answer.

As I understand it (and from personal observation when I had a Trinitron TV and I'm primarily wondering about this type of CRT but the question probably applies to others), the screen has groupings of RBG phospher dots and the RGB guns "activate" those dots as needed; however, what I'm not understanding is how a given gun "activates" a given dot. Is a particular phosphor dot sensitive to a property of one of the color guns such that a blue dot ignores a red gun, etc.? If so, then I can somewhat understand it but I'm wondering if I'm way off in that assumption.

The various sites just seem to indicate there are three guns, each of which magically cause a given color to appear but it's not explained how a single color gun causes a corresponding dot to glow without affecting the ones around it.

(Hope that made sense...)

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Lee" <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:27:46 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

Hi Barry,

Pete's book mainly covers electrostatically deflected crts. Except for
some very early models, TVs used magnetically deflected crts (to allow
large screens without absurd set depths). The guns are similar, but the
deflection methods are very different because of the different
optimization objectives.

--Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 11/16/2020 07:18, n4buq wrote:
Does anyone know whether this book covers CRTs that were used for color TVs
(and other color displays)? I ask because I'm not finding good
information on how those work.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman W7pF" <dennis@ridesoft.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 12:15:11 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology,
History, and Applications"

Hi Chris,
I don't expect any problems shipping this to Germany.

One correction:
This offer is strictly between Peter Keller and individual members of the
group. I did offer to act as the go-between because I thought there might
be
some interest and because I understood how "sensitive" our members are to
price. I was also hoping this would give Peter some well-deserved cash as
we
get close to the holidays.

So I told Peter I thought I might be able to pass along 10 orders for his
book. When he said OK I notified TekScopes. That was 36 hours ago. I have
orders for over 50 of his books as of this moment.

This brings back memories of when I asked for small donations to pay
Groups.io the annual fee for hosting TekScopes back at the beginning of
the
year. Somebody please remind me the next time I think up something like
this
to think twice about what happened the last two times I had a bright idea.
:)

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
ChrisBeee
via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:47 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes
Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

Hi Dennis,
I would be more than glad if I could support the group buy and get a copy
of
Peter's book, many thanks for making this possible! My only concern is if
you would ship to Germany too. I will send you a PM with my contact data.
Cheers
Chris







--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator

















Re: Special Offer from Peter Keller to TekScopes Members: The Cathode Ray Tube, Technology, History, and Applications"

snapdiode
 

I'm a bit confused about the Trinitron having "dots", the Trinitron relies on stripes and the mask is an aperture grille.

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