Date   

Looking for some length of cable of the P6042 probe

benj3867
 

I am looking for some length of the p6042 current probe cable.
It again broke where the cable enters the amplifier, and it is already shortened from the last time(s) this happened that removing the bad part would make it too short.

So, if anybody has some NOS length of this cable, or some old defective probes I can use the cable of, please help!
I believe the A6302 also uses the same cable, but I may be wrong.


P.S.,
It's hard to imagine that Deane Kidd is no longer with us for 5 years now :(, If I recall correctly he had a good amount of NOS cable back in the day.


Re: Email contact oddity - Spam Blacklisted?

Dave Daniel
 

Ok. It’s fine that you don’t think so.

DavdD

On Nov 8, 2020, at 12:57, Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com> wrote:

I don't think so. Dennis's emails are stuck in the infinite
retry loop, which seems to mean that Colin's ISP is set to
drop on the floor all emails that it doesn't want to receive.

It considers them spam, and as such, unworthy of acknowledgement.

The sender's ISP retries... and retries... and retries....

This is a common technique, as it wastes the spam sender's
resources and time, and costs Colin's ISP little or nothing.

-Chuck Harris

Dave Daniel wrote:
If that were the case, Dennis’ emails would bounce, which is not happening.

DaveD

On Nov 8, 2020, at 11:06, Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com> wrote:

I think Dennis has it bass-ackwards. The problem is not the
receiver, but rather that the receiver's ISP subscribes to a
service that knows the sender, Dennis, to be a spam generator.

This same problem visited me, maybe a dozen years ago....

I got into an email argument with one of the members of this
group, who thought a just punishment for my disagreeing with
him would be to disrupt my life, by turning me in to Spamhaus
as a spammer.

It was a simple act on his part, he just clicked the REPORT SPAM
button on the anti-spam plugin he installed on his email program.

In a matter of days, emails from my main email address would
bounce when I sent them to members of my circle of family and
friends.

I tracked down my problem to a highly authoritarian European
company, Spamhaus, that maintains a list of entities adjudicated
by themselves to be serial spammers.

This Spamhaus list is the basis of dozens of subscription based
spam blocking services used by many ISP's worldwide.

All you need to get on Spamhaus's list is for ONE (1) person to
click a button on their email program, and report you as a
spammer.

To get off the list, you must contact Spamhaus and provide them
with a host of personal information, and to jump through a few
hoops, to prove that you are a real person... As if!

I got off the list by threatening my ISP, and a few of the ISP's
that subscribe to the offending spam blocking services, with
restraint of trade lawsuits.

Whether or not Dennis knows it, he is a lightning rod for a
group of highly technical miscreants that haunt, or have at one
time haunted this group... many of whom are very nasty,
vindictive people.

Groups.io's solution to the Spamhaus problem is to kick anyone
that bounces groups.io emails as spam, off of group.io.

-Chuck Harris

Colin Herbert via groups.io wrote:
I have belatedly thought of another route to examining this oddity. Apart
from Siggi and Carsten contacting me directly, maybe others might like to
give it a try? My email address can be extracted from that which appears on
Tekscopes, but it is:



Colingherbert(at)blueyonder(dot)co(dot) uk



I will reply directly to any messages that get through to me, so as not to
take bandwidth from Tekscopes.

TIA, Colin.

















Re: Dennis Tillman

Vince Vielhaber
 

Blueyonder is in many spam databases PLUS blueyonder doesn't accept mail from every domain and they don't provide their criteria for what they accept and don't accept. To make things worse, when they refuse mail from a domain they don't do it correctly and treat it as a temporary failure, one that should be a permanent failure, so the sending host has to keep trying over and over until it finally gives up.

I host a number of mailing lists and I've been round and round with them. Now I just tell people that blueyonder isn't welcome here and the list software rejects them outright.

Vince.

On 11/08/2020 05:48 AM, Colin Herbert via groups.io wrote:
Hi,
If this problem with my email server is irritating anyone else, I apologise profusely. I receive emails from many people with no problem, but this is puzzling me completely. Apart from contact from Tekscopes, I also get plenty of other email, so I cannot understand why Dennis (and others) cannot get through to me.

May I thank those of you who have emailed me at my personal address - Siggi and Carsten got through fine. I have also had messages from Susan at Sphere, so what is going wrong?

My knowledge of email systems is rudimentary at best, so I am at a loss as to what might be the cause. Please bear with me.
TIA, Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael W. Lynch via groups.io
Sent: 07 November 2020 23:24
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Dennis Tillman

I think Dennis mentioned that he was working on a project. So he may be deep in thought.

Michael Lynch

From My I-Phone
mlynch003@yahoo.com

479-477-1115







Re: Email contact oddity - Spam Blacklisted?

Chuck Harris
 

I don't think so. Dennis's emails are stuck in the infinite
retry loop, which seems to mean that Colin's ISP is set to
drop on the floor all emails that it doesn't want to receive.

It considers them spam, and as such, unworthy of acknowledgement.

The sender's ISP retries... and retries... and retries....

This is a common technique, as it wastes the spam sender's
resources and time, and costs Colin's ISP little or nothing.

-Chuck Harris

Dave Daniel wrote:

If that were the case, Dennis’ emails would bounce, which is not happening.

DaveD

On Nov 8, 2020, at 11:06, Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com> wrote:

I think Dennis has it bass-ackwards. The problem is not the
receiver, but rather that the receiver's ISP subscribes to a
service that knows the sender, Dennis, to be a spam generator.

This same problem visited me, maybe a dozen years ago....

I got into an email argument with one of the members of this
group, who thought a just punishment for my disagreeing with
him would be to disrupt my life, by turning me in to Spamhaus
as a spammer.

It was a simple act on his part, he just clicked the REPORT SPAM
button on the anti-spam plugin he installed on his email program.

In a matter of days, emails from my main email address would
bounce when I sent them to members of my circle of family and
friends.

I tracked down my problem to a highly authoritarian European
company, Spamhaus, that maintains a list of entities adjudicated
by themselves to be serial spammers.

This Spamhaus list is the basis of dozens of subscription based
spam blocking services used by many ISP's worldwide.

All you need to get on Spamhaus's list is for ONE (1) person to
click a button on their email program, and report you as a
spammer.

To get off the list, you must contact Spamhaus and provide them
with a host of personal information, and to jump through a few
hoops, to prove that you are a real person... As if!

I got off the list by threatening my ISP, and a few of the ISP's
that subscribe to the offending spam blocking services, with
restraint of trade lawsuits.

Whether or not Dennis knows it, he is a lightning rod for a
group of highly technical miscreants that haunt, or have at one
time haunted this group... many of whom are very nasty,
vindictive people.

Groups.io's solution to the Spamhaus problem is to kick anyone
that bounces groups.io emails as spam, off of group.io.

-Chuck Harris

Colin Herbert via groups.io wrote:
I have belatedly thought of another route to examining this oddity. Apart
from Siggi and Carsten contacting me directly, maybe others might like to
give it a try? My email address can be extracted from that which appears on
Tekscopes, but it is:



Colingherbert(at)blueyonder(dot)co(dot) uk



I will reply directly to any messages that get through to me, so as not to
take bandwidth from Tekscopes.

TIA, Colin.














Re: Tek 224 repair (solved)

Fred S.
 

it was the horizontal pos potentiometer. Dummy me, I am used to analog scopes and since the trace did not start all the way to left, I missed it, the visible trace start is set by the MCU and it is constant.

--
Best regards,

Fred S.


Re: Email contact oddity - Spam Blacklisted?

Dave Daniel
 

If that were the case, Dennis’ emails would bounce, which is not happening.

DaveD

On Nov 8, 2020, at 11:06, Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com> wrote:

I think Dennis has it bass-ackwards. The problem is not the
receiver, but rather that the receiver's ISP subscribes to a
service that knows the sender, Dennis, to be a spam generator.

This same problem visited me, maybe a dozen years ago....

I got into an email argument with one of the members of this
group, who thought a just punishment for my disagreeing with
him would be to disrupt my life, by turning me in to Spamhaus
as a spammer.

It was a simple act on his part, he just clicked the REPORT SPAM
button on the anti-spam plugin he installed on his email program.

In a matter of days, emails from my main email address would
bounce when I sent them to members of my circle of family and
friends.

I tracked down my problem to a highly authoritarian European
company, Spamhaus, that maintains a list of entities adjudicated
by themselves to be serial spammers.

This Spamhaus list is the basis of dozens of subscription based
spam blocking services used by many ISP's worldwide.

All you need to get on Spamhaus's list is for ONE (1) person to
click a button on their email program, and report you as a
spammer.

To get off the list, you must contact Spamhaus and provide them
with a host of personal information, and to jump through a few
hoops, to prove that you are a real person... As if!

I got off the list by threatening my ISP, and a few of the ISP's
that subscribe to the offending spam blocking services, with
restraint of trade lawsuits.

Whether or not Dennis knows it, he is a lightning rod for a
group of highly technical miscreants that haunt, or have at one
time haunted this group... many of whom are very nasty,
vindictive people.

Groups.io's solution to the Spamhaus problem is to kick anyone
that bounces groups.io emails as spam, off of group.io.

-Chuck Harris

Colin Herbert via groups.io wrote:
I have belatedly thought of another route to examining this oddity. Apart
from Siggi and Carsten contacting me directly, maybe others might like to
give it a try? My email address can be extracted from that which appears on
Tekscopes, but it is:



Colingherbert(at)blueyonder(dot)co(dot) uk



I will reply directly to any messages that get through to me, so as not to
take bandwidth from Tekscopes.

TIA, Colin.










Re: Email contact oddity - Spam Blacklisted?

Chuck Harris
 

I think Dennis has it bass-ackwards. The problem is not the
receiver, but rather that the receiver's ISP subscribes to a
service that knows the sender, Dennis, to be a spam generator.

This same problem visited me, maybe a dozen years ago....

I got into an email argument with one of the members of this
group, who thought a just punishment for my disagreeing with
him would be to disrupt my life, by turning me in to Spamhaus
as a spammer.

It was a simple act on his part, he just clicked the REPORT SPAM
button on the anti-spam plugin he installed on his email program.

In a matter of days, emails from my main email address would
bounce when I sent them to members of my circle of family and
friends.

I tracked down my problem to a highly authoritarian European
company, Spamhaus, that maintains a list of entities adjudicated
by themselves to be serial spammers.

This Spamhaus list is the basis of dozens of subscription based
spam blocking services used by many ISP's worldwide.

All you need to get on Spamhaus's list is for ONE (1) person to
click a button on their email program, and report you as a
spammer.

To get off the list, you must contact Spamhaus and provide them
with a host of personal information, and to jump through a few
hoops, to prove that you are a real person... As if!

I got off the list by threatening my ISP, and a few of the ISP's
that subscribe to the offending spam blocking services, with
restraint of trade lawsuits.

Whether or not Dennis knows it, he is a lightning rod for a
group of highly technical miscreants that haunt, or have at one
time haunted this group... many of whom are very nasty,
vindictive people.

Groups.io's solution to the Spamhaus problem is to kick anyone
that bounces groups.io emails as spam, off of group.io.

-Chuck Harris

Colin Herbert via groups.io wrote:

I have belatedly thought of another route to examining this oddity. Apart
from Siggi and Carsten contacting me directly, maybe others might like to
give it a try? My email address can be extracted from that which appears on
Tekscopes, but it is:



Colingherbert(at)blueyonder(dot)co(dot) uk



I will reply directly to any messages that get through to me, so as not to
take bandwidth from Tekscopes.

TIA, Colin.







Tek 212 Scope battery holder end caps?

Jared Cabot
 

I've just pulled out my 212 scope from storage for its time on the healing bench, and found that the previous owner discarded the old internal batteries along with the end caps.

Does anyone have a set of 4 end caps they are willing to sell, or can provide me with measurements so I can make a design for 3D printing a set?


Thanks!
Jared


Re: Troubleshooting an old Tek 475

Harvey White
 

Other than reading the "how it works" in the Tek manuals.....

Building one is a good idea, but you never learned much from putting together a heathkit, because I seem to remember that there wasn't any theory in the manuals (or not much).

Since you are a programmer, I'd suggest messing around with arduinos.  The platform is quite limited (for debugging), but has a lot of examples, libraries, and the like.  Once you start writing your own code to match the new hardware you're messing with, that'll help.

(EE degree, then went into programming....)

Harvey

On 11/8/2020 1:50 AM, Jeff Dutky wrote:
On Sat, Nov 7, 2020 at 10:56 PM, Paul Amaranth wrote:

ESR meters are pretty handy and they really don't need to be
all that complicated. I built an analog one with a couple
of op amps and an old meter for around $10.
I really like the idea of building my own, not because I'm cheap, but because I'm just getting back into this hobby after ignoring it for many years, and I need small projects that I can complete in a short period of time. For example, I just got my feet wet a few weeks ago with digital logic, and I have not yet had a chance to build anything with discrete transistors or op amps. I bailed on an EE degree in junior year to do computer science, so I know some very basic stuff -- I can read a schematic, and do basic measurements with a multimeter and oscilloscope -- but there's all kinds of things are still essentially mysterious to me, and I need concrete tasks to get exposure to even fairly basic concepts.





Re: Email contact oddity - Spam Blacklisted?

Jean-Paul
 

Colin I have struggled with similar email disconnects with others.

The only good solution is to have several email providers as alternatives.

I have 12 email addresses on various servers and manage with open source client Mozilla Thunderbird.

Jon


Re: OT - RIFA caps & 'transformerless' PSU

Lawrance A. Schneider
 

On Sat, Nov 7, 2020 at 11:35 AM, Carsten Bormann wrote:



At the present time, I can get to my equipment - so, I was wondering did
HP put this type of capacitor on their equipment?
I’m not sure I understand this sentence,
I was not a home at the time I wrote it. When I got home, I cannot open each case and look as I have other obligations the must come first.

Thus, my question was for planning purposes. I have a Tek 2465 & 2465BDM. I have HP E3630A, 3312A, 8112A, 8116A, 8594E (which I hope to sell). Should I buy new caps for each and plan on working on each piece of equipment to avoid 'the explosion' of which I had NO idea before Mr. Phillips posted his query.

Note that these may be buried in high-quality line filters (e.g., from Schaffner), so
any line filter from that period is suspect.
WOW!!!!! Now I hope someone like Mr. Harris or others with encyclopedic knowledge of these instruments has some idea of the time frame of which you wrote.

Danke, larry


Email contact oddity - Spam Blacklisted?

Colin Herbert
 

I have belatedly thought of another route to examining this oddity. Apart
from Siggi and Carsten contacting me directly, maybe others might like to
give it a try? My email address can be extracted from that which appears on
Tekscopes, but it is:



Colingherbert(at)blueyonder(dot)co(dot) uk



I will reply directly to any messages that get through to me, so as not to
take bandwidth from Tekscopes.

TIA, Colin.


Tek 224 repair

Fred S.
 

I got a Tek 224 a few weeks back, that seemed to be completely dead.
I found a defective high voltage ceramic cap and the high voltage transformer had an internal short.
Replaced the transformer with one out of a Tek 222A and the cap. Finally I got the scope back to work, so I thought.
But the trace(s) (ch1 or ch2) are only half length, they start in the correct position on the left edge of the grid, but end in the middle of the screen. The readout is in the correct position on both halves. If I turn on the horizontal X10, the traces are full length.
Did anybody see that issue before?

--
Best regards,

Fred S.


Re: Dennis Tillman

Colin Herbert
 

Hi,
If this problem with my email server is irritating anyone else, I apologise profusely. I receive emails from many people with no problem, but this is puzzling me completely. Apart from contact from Tekscopes, I also get plenty of other email, so I cannot understand why Dennis (and others) cannot get through to me.

May I thank those of you who have emailed me at my personal address - Siggi and Carsten got through fine. I have also had messages from Susan at Sphere, so what is going wrong?

My knowledge of email systems is rudimentary at best, so I am at a loss as to what might be the cause. Please bear with me.
TIA, Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael W. Lynch via groups.io
Sent: 07 November 2020 23:24
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Dennis Tillman

I think Dennis mentioned that he was working on a project. So he may be deep in thought.

Michael Lynch

From My I-Phone

mlynch003@yahoo.com

479-477-1115


Re: Dennis Tillman

Jean-Paul
 

Dear Dennis! Fine to see your note, I have exactly the same issue with certain (non-TEK/iogroup) contacts.

A few notes of my experience:

Worst email domains are Yahoo and Free.fr,: The correspondent can send to me but ever reply is rejected with multiple notices sent periodically as you mention.
The correspondent never has any clew what to do and even if you try to whitelist its never effective.
I believe that the offending email servers have a hardware antispam filter with blacklists updated dynamically.
The issue can be either your IP address or that of your email server is on the BL, OR that your email server domain is on the BL.

For years I tried to fix this both in France and USA, to no avail!

Bon soiree,

Jon


Re: Clean and Lubricate Pots in Tek 475

 

It looks like I was mistaken about what came with my father's 2213: I just found the printed copy of the 2213 Oscilloscope Operators Instruction Manual in a box with what looks like the other contents of the scope pouch (including the manual for the probes, assorted cables, wires, and components, all neatly bagged and labeled). In the front of the operators manual is the edge tag from what was clearly a perforated card. Handwritten on the tag is the note "Sent for Service Manual 8/24" which I must assume means August 24, 1981, because the front page of the manual reads only "First Printing JUN 1981" while the pdf version I downloaded from BAMA reads "First Printing JUN 1981, Revised AUG 1982". I guess this means I've got at least the 2213 service manual in some box in the attic or basement.

That probably means the chance of finding the 475 service manual, probably in the same box, has dramatically increased.


Re: Troubleshooting an old Tek 475

 

on Sat, Nov 7, 2020 at 10:56 PM, Paul Amaranth wrote:

On the 400 series of scopes if I have to replace one of those can
electrolytics, I'll replace all of them. Their tendency to dry out
and fail open is a common, known, failure mechanism.
Oh, the cap I replaced wasn't one of the big cans, it was probably the smallest axial lead electrolytic in the whole machine. I was worried that the big caps in the power supply might be bad too (and I've bought some adapters to allow easy replacement with new components) but after checking the voltages and ripple on the power supply test points I'm much less immediately concerned about them.

I don't know exactly why this scope still seems to have good caps. Its first eight years were pretty rough, but it spent the next 40 years in a cool, dry basement with only occasional use. I guess that, along with quality components chosen by Tek, is the explanation, but it's still surprising. The last time I tried to get back into this hobby was around 2005, and I bought an inexpensive BKP signal generator, which then spent the next 15 years sitting right next to the 475. The filter caps on the BK were dry as a bone when I tried to power it a couple months back, but the 475 is going like a champ.


Re: Troubleshooting an old Tek 475

 

On Sat, Nov 7, 2020 at 10:56 PM, Paul Amaranth wrote:

ESR meters are pretty handy and they really don't need to be
all that complicated. I built an analog one with a couple
of op amps and an old meter for around $10.
I really like the idea of building my own, not because I'm cheap, but because I'm just getting back into this hobby after ignoring it for many years, and I need small projects that I can complete in a short period of time. For example, I just got my feet wet a few weeks ago with digital logic, and I have not yet had a chance to build anything with discrete transistors or op amps. I bailed on an EE degree in junior year to do computer science, so I know some very basic stuff -- I can read a schematic, and do basic measurements with a multimeter and oscilloscope -- but there's all kinds of things are still essentially mysterious to me, and I need concrete tasks to get exposure to even fairly basic concepts.


Re: Troubleshooting an old Tek 475

Paul Amaranth
 

ESR meters are pretty handy and they really don't need to be
all that complicated. I built an analog one with a couple
of op amps and an old meter for around $10.

One of the nice features of an esr meter is the test voltage is
usually around 100mV so it won't turn on any semiconductor
junctions in the area and can be used in circuit. You really
don't want to be unsoldering everything to test it.

There's a couple of really nice designs on the eevblog. There's
a 5 transistor esr meter here:

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/5-transistor-esr-meter-design/

Also on that thread is an adapter you can make for your dmm that uses
a handful of op amps and reads out 0-20 ohms.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/5-transistor-esr-meter-design/msg327393/?topicseen#msg327393

PCBs are nice but you can breadboard those things; there's nothing
critical about them.

Two or three decimals in resolution are overkill anyway. If a 100uF
cap is > 1 ohm you're in the bad range anyway regardless if it's 1.01
or 1.10 ohms.

On the 400 series of scopes if I have to replace one of those can
electrolytics, I'll replace all of them. Their tendency to dry out
and fail open is a common, known, failure mechanism.

I ignore tantalums unless they go bad. Finding a shorted tant in a
scope with dozens or hundreds can be a challenge, but there are ways
to make that relatively easy.

Paul

On Sat, Nov 07, 2020 at 05:49:30PM -0800, Jeff Dutky wrote:
Glenn Little wrote:
If you found one capacitor like this, you will probably find others.
Sounds like it is time to replace the electrolytic capacitors.
They are probably well beyond their design life.
You have a gift for understatement.

I have been wanting to get an ESR meter, but I just haven't gotten around to it. I'm just picking up the electronics hobby again in order to fill my extra hours during the pandemic, and to address, in some useful way, a stash of antique electronics acquired over three generations. It's taking a little while to assemble all the proper tools and instruments.

I do have an EICO model 950B resistance-capacitance bridge that belonged to my grandfather, but a) it's in dire need of restoration itself, and b) it's not a quantitative device (though I can't wait till I get that magic eye working).

I've seen good reviews for a meter that appears to only been available in kit form, possibly only in Australia, but it doesn't seem to be available any longer. Do you have any recommendations for a good ESR meter to get?







!DSPAM:5fa74eb1216121029220781!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


Re: Clean and Lubricate Pots in Tek 475

Eric
 

Hey Jeff isopropyl alcohol is probably one of the most used cleaners in
electronics. And yes stay away from acetone on tek gear it tends to eat the
plastics.

Eric

On Sat, Nov 7, 2020, 8:31 PM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Bruce Gentry wrote:
WD-40 is acceptable as a part of a mechanical cleaning process. Flush
it out with a correct solvent after it had done it's work.

Would a "correct solvent" be isopropyl alcohol? I have access to a few
other solvents, but some of them are explicitly forbidden in the Tek
documents (e.g. Acetone) and at least one other (whether or not it's
forbidden by Tek) is known to attack some common plastics.

An esoteric collection of solvents is another unusual feature of my
father's effects which I have taken some pains to keep well sealed and
safely stored.





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