Date   

Re: Cut wiring harness

Jamie Ostrowski
 

Thanks everyone for the tips. I'll try experimenting with my splicing
technique using these ideas and see if I can come up with a satisfactory
joint. It sure would be nice if I can find wire with matching tracers but
so far I haven't had any luck, which is unfortunate.

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 2:08 PM Dwayne Reid <dwayner@...> wrote:

Hi there, Jamie.

One possible alternative is to use 30 AWG wire to hold the lap joints
together before soldering. However, this requires more room to work.

This type of connection is required for some levels high-reliability
work (IPC Level 3S). Strip the conductors, wrap the lap joint with
thin tinned wire, solder. Use the minimum amount of solder
necessary, don't let the solder wick under the conductor
insulation. We purchase 30 AWG tinned wire from Belden in multi-pound
spools.

The downside of this technique is that you have to be able to
separate the conductors far enough for your fingers (or round-nose
tweezers) to fish the wrapping wire around the conductor. But it
makes extremely reliable connections that don't exceed the insulation
diameter.

dwayne


At 10:50 AM 8/7/2020, Leon Robinson wrote:

In these conditions I would suggest that the splices be lap soldered and
shrink tube to minimize the size of the splices.
I know lap splices are frowned upon but here I think it is the
better solution.

Leon Robinson K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.

Politicians and Diapers should be changed
often and for the same reasons.

On Friday, August 7, 2020, 11:18:30 AM CDT,
kim.herron@... <kim.herron@...> wrote:

Yes I have done this before, in several arenas. Cars, AM
transmitters, linear amplifiers, custom built test
equipment, etc. IF you have BOTH
pieces that have been cut, you can match up the wire
colors and splice them together. You will want to cut the
looms back on both ends so that your repairs don't
become so large that you can't get the loom back in
place. You'll need to stagger your repair splices so that
you can get it back together. That will require some
replacement wire, and lots of shrink tube. Doing this will
be much easier that trying to recreate the harness. I've
done that too, but the work involved here would be
excessive. The splice route is the way to go.

If you have the original manual with all the wiring info, it
makes it easier to ID what goes where.

On 7 Aug 2020 at 8:58, Jamie Ostrowski wrote:


I bought a pair of 556 oscilloscopes from an electronics scrapper
that I am restoring. I think I'm able to get the rest of the parts
that were harvested from the person who sold them to the scrapper,
but unfortunately, they sliced through a couple of wire harnesses.
The point where they were sliced the harnesses are made up of what
looks like 24 gauge tinned wire and others look like maybe 20 gauge.
I'm trying to weigh whether I should splice the looms back together
or if I should re-wire. Re-wiring looks like it's going to be an
incredibly painful process that will take me literally probably 100
hours of work per scope. Just hunting down originally correct color
coding wires is going to be a nightmare, and then routing them
correctly and re-tying the looms......whew.

It's unbelievable how much work one snip of a wire cutter can
generate.

Has anyone gone down a path like this before in a restoration and do
you have any tips?

Fortunately I do have a third complete 556 that I can use as a model
to compare with.



John Goller, K9UWA & Jean Goller, N9PXF
Antique Radio Restorations
k9uwa@...
Visit our Web Site at:
http://www.JohnJeanAntiqueRadio.com
4836 Ranch Road
Leo, IN 46765
USA
1-260-637-6426






--
Dwayne Reid <dwayner@...>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd Edmonton, AB, CANADA
780-489-3199 voice 780-487-6397 fax 888-489-3199 Toll Free
www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing





Re: 475 With a bowed display. . . .Ideas?

Stephen
 

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 09:38 AM, Michael W. Lynch wrote

Nice find Michael. Congrats.

Problem is when I put my marker signal from my marker generator into the unit
and set Volts/Div knob for 6-8 division vertical markers then I center the
middle marker to align with the center vertical graticule line, as you move
away from the center, the markers become more and more "leaned in" in at the
top. Left and right of center, the tops of the markers lean progressively
more and more toward the center as you move farther from the centerline. The
bottom trace line is barely, but ever so slightly bowed. The vertical markers
are straight but just leaning in toward the centerline. The bottom trace
bowing is not nearly as profound as the "leaning" of the markers. Trace can
be adjusted to about 1/2 trace width of bow, checking at top middle and bottom
of the display.
I’m not sure, but that makes me think « geometry »? Maybe??


475 With a bowed display. . . .Ideas?

Michael W. Lynch
 

I recently found a nice 475. Upon receiving the unit, I fired it up, the scope presented a strange garbled trace. Checking the various LV supplies, I found the +15V and the +15V Unregulated to be very low at about 12.2 and 16.5 respectively. Lifted the +15V jumper and there was no change, indicating that the problem was in the power supply, not the scope circuitry. Otherwise the scope looks almost new inside, no signs of tampering or repairs. All other supply voltages are spot on.

Problem was C1442 was bad. High resistance and almost no capacitance, loading the +15V supply. Replaced that cap with a new modern cap and both voltages are now spot on. Ripple checked on all supplies and we are within specs.

Cleaned and exercised all the push button switches.

Trace is bright and fairly clear for a mesh CRT.

Horz and Vert Position controls work as expected.

Focus works well

Trace Rotation R1386 controls rotation either side of horizontal equally.

Set the scope in X-Y and defocus the dot, the resulting spot is nice and round. Astig control R1397 produces the expected change in the spot. The Spot will go "oblong" in both X and Y directions in response to turning R1397.

Horizontal timing is close to right as the timing marker setting generally agrees with the Time/Div switch setting, some adjustment is needed, but the horizontal is only off about 5-7% or so.

Problem is when I put my marker signal from my marker generator into the unit and set Volts/Div knob for 6-8 division vertical markers then I center the middle marker to align with the center vertical graticule line, as you move away from the center, the markers become more and more "leaned in" in at the top. Left and right of center, the tops of the markers lean progressively more and more toward the center as you move farther from the centerline. The bottom trace line is barely, but ever so slightly bowed. The vertical markers are straight but just leaning in toward the centerline. The bottom trace bowing is not nearly as profound as the "leaning" of the markers. Trace can be adjusted to about 1/2 trace width of bow, checking at top middle and bottom of the display.

Y Align R1385 and Geometry R1390 will not bring the vertical markers into proper vertical alignment even though they do have some effect on the trace by making it less severe. Even though they never "Fix" the problem.

I have fixed several of these scopes and never encountered this issue before, where it could not be adjusted out of the instrument.

Ideas or suggestions?

Thanks in Advance.
--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


Re: 7834 Missing Trace

sdferg7@...
 

For clarity, the image I took was at the same intensity setting on the knob, but now that I just turned it on after sitting for a while, the issue with the brightness seems to have corrected itself. The traces also no longer exhibit the popping in and out as I described before. They now come on smoothly with the intensity knobs. The problem with the upper peaks seems to come and go a little bit, but is much better now. However, when I try chop mode I get two dots, one for each time base.

Shane


Re: 7834 Missing Trace

sdferg7@...
 

Ok, I think I'm almost there so hopefully I'll be out of your hair soon, haha. I got U4494 out and cleaned and reseated it. Then, with a liberal amount of wiggling, the logic board popped in place and all the connecting pins appear aligned correctly. It seemed at least one of the pins near the bottom center was not aligned previously. Now when the scope is powered on the and I slowly turn the intensity on one of the traces up, the trace will flicker and pop in and out on the screen until I get to about 1/3 intensity when it suddenly comes in steady and mostly normal.

If there is no signal the trace behaves as it should, but when I attach the calibration signal, the top peaks appear fuzzy and jump up and down about half a division periodically. The left time base also appears about half as bright as the right one. Here is an image: https://imgur.com/a/ARi67OV

Alt mode is working now, but when I first turned it on I would only get a dot from the right time base, but selecting either A or B would work as I described. Any advice?

Shane


FG 504 problems

Colin Herbert
 

I am labeling this as "problems" because while I have one or two current problems that I am puzzling over, I am sure that I will have more queries to add until I get this Function Generator working right.
My current puzzle relates to a jumper on the A3 Loop Board labelled "W20 Phase lock Jumper". This jumper, according to the Service Manual, allows the VCF Input to function as a phase modulating input. While its position is shown on the Internal Adjustments section A3 Loop Board diagram, there appears to be no indication of which is the default setting and which the VCF input setting. I cannot locate the jumper on the schematics either. Can anyone please enlighten me?
TIA, Colin.


Re: DC503 repair (pwr supply and incorrect display)

Dave Wise
 

Sure there is replacement available, just at insane price. Boca Semi has them for around $30 each.
I would engineer a substitute using current parts. Do you need open collector? Is tri-state enough? If so, that makes it easier, just use 74-series TTL and rearrange the pins.

Dave Wise
________________________________________
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> on behalf of um-gs via groups.io <um-gs=arcor.de@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, August 07, 2020 11:14 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] DC503 repair (pwr supply and incorrect display)

Hi,
I had to repair a defect DC 503 (S/N B101963) (damaged by power failure).
The display was showing zeros, no reaction on input frequencies.
A check of the internal voltages showed that the - 22V line was at about - 8 V.
Lot of searching and part exchange finally proved that the transistors Q545 and Q548 had degraded in their current amplification so they could not drive the external power transistor in the mainframe.
Replacing both transistors with high beta pnp types ( in this case BC557B) solved the problem - the -22V were back.
After that the inputs were working again, frequency was displayed but showing a strange behaviour - when the input frequency was increased from 1,999 to 2,000, the display jumped to "0", then showing strange values.
This happened in all frequency ranges.
A long search and replacing the (socketed) ICs finally led to the finding that the BCD-line representing "2" in the output BUS of the storage register was shorted to ground. Therefore no "2" value from the BCD-Bus was transferred, all digits could only display 1,4,5,8,9. Removing all Latch ICs U320...U326 (Type 4035) proved that one of them had a shorted output pin 11 which grounded the "2"-BCD bus line.
Removing it solved the malfunction.

Final question: it seems that this IC type Motorola MC4035p is totally obsolete - I couldn't find any replacement or supply. When searching you always get the CMOS type 4035 which is 16 pin and has a totally different function.
Has anybody a resource for the TTL MC4035P type?

Thanks, Gordian


Re: Cut wiring harness

Dwayne Reid
 

Hi there, Jamie.

One possible alternative is to use 30 AWG wire to hold the lap joints together before soldering. However, this requires more room to work.

This type of connection is required for some levels high-reliability work (IPC Level 3S). Strip the conductors, wrap the lap joint with thin tinned wire, solder. Use the minimum amount of solder necessary, don't let the solder wick under the conductor insulation. We purchase 30 AWG tinned wire from Belden in multi-pound spools.

The downside of this technique is that you have to be able to separate the conductors far enough for your fingers (or round-nose tweezers) to fish the wrapping wire around the conductor. But it makes extremely reliable connections that don't exceed the insulation diameter.

dwayne

At 10:50 AM 8/7/2020, Leon Robinson wrote:

In these conditions I would suggest that the splices be lap soldered and
shrink tube to minimize the size of the splices.
I know lap splices are frowned upon but here I think it is the better solution.

Leon Robinson K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.

Politicians and Diapers should be changed
often and for the same reasons.

On Friday, August 7, 2020, 11:18:30 AM CDT, kim.herron@... <kim.herron@...> wrote:

Yes I have done this before, in several arenas. Cars, AM
transmitters, linear amplifiers, custom built test
equipment, etc. IF you have BOTH
pieces that have been cut, you can match up the wire
colors and splice them together. You will want to cut the
looms back on both ends so that your repairs don't
become so large that you can't get the loom back in
place. You'll need to stagger your repair splices so that
you can get it back together. That will require some
replacement wire, and lots of shrink tube. Doing this will
be much easier that trying to recreate the harness. I've
done that too, but the work involved here would be
excessive. The splice route is the way to go.

If you have the original manual with all the wiring info, it
makes it easier to ID what goes where.

On 7 Aug 2020 at 8:58, Jamie Ostrowski wrote:


I bought a pair of 556 oscilloscopes from an electronics scrapper
that I am restoring. I think I'm able to get the rest of the parts
that were harvested from the person who sold them to the scrapper,
but unfortunately, they sliced through a couple of wire harnesses.
The point where they were sliced the harnesses are made up of what
looks like 24 gauge tinned wire and others look like maybe 20 gauge.
I'm trying to weigh whether I should splice the looms back together
or if I should re-wire. Re-wiring looks like it's going to be an
incredibly painful process that will take me literally probably 100
hours of work per scope. Just hunting down originally correct color
coding wires is going to be a nightmare, and then routing them
correctly and re-tying the looms......whew.

It's unbelievable how much work one snip of a wire cutter can
generate.

Has anyone gone down a path like this before in a restoration and do
you have any tips?

Fortunately I do have a third complete 556 that I can use as a model
to compare with.



John Goller, K9UWA & Jean Goller, N9PXF
Antique Radio Restorations
k9uwa@...
Visit our Web Site at:
http://www.JohnJeanAntiqueRadio.com
4836 Ranch Road
Leo, IN 46765
USA
1-260-637-6426





--
Dwayne Reid <dwayner@...>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd Edmonton, AB, CANADA
780-489-3199 voice 780-487-6397 fax 888-489-3199 Toll Free
www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing


DC503 repair (pwr supply and incorrect display)

um-gs@...
 

Hi,
I had to repair a defect DC 503 (S/N B101963) (damaged by power failure).
The display was showing zeros, no reaction on input frequencies.
A check of the internal voltages showed that the - 22V line was at about - 8 V.
Lot of searching and part exchange finally proved that the transistors Q545 and Q548 had degraded in their current amplification so they could not drive the external power transistor in the mainframe.
Replacing both transistors with high beta pnp types ( in this case BC557B) solved the problem - the -22V were back.
After that the inputs were working again, frequency was displayed but showing a strange behaviour - when the input frequency was increased from 1,999 to 2,000, the display jumped to "0", then showing strange values.
This happened in all frequency ranges.
A long search and replacing the (socketed) ICs finally led to the finding that the BCD-line representing "2" in the output BUS of the storage register was shorted to ground. Therefore no "2" value from the BCD-Bus was transferred, all digits could only display 1,4,5,8,9. Removing all Latch ICs U320...U326 (Type 4035) proved that one of them had a shorted output pin 11 which grounded the "2"-BCD bus line.
Removing it solved the malfunction.

Final question: it seems that this IC type Motorola MC4035p is totally obsolete - I couldn't find any replacement or supply. When searching you always get the CMOS type 4035 which is 16 pin and has a totally different function.
Has anybody a resource for the TTL MC4035P type?

Thanks, Gordian


restoring CRT with tek 576

Miguel Work
 

https://vintagetek.org/russian-31ln4-dvst-crt/


At the end of the article. I have used my 576 for restore CRT too.


Re: Cut wiring harness

Leon Robinson
 

In these conditions I would suggest that the splices be lap soldered and
shrink tube to minimize the size of the splices.
I know lap splices are frowned upon but here I think it is the better solution.

Leon Robinson    K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.

Politicians and Diapers should be changed
often and for the same reasons.

On Friday, August 7, 2020, 11:18:30 AM CDT, kim.herron@... <kim.herron@...> wrote:

Yes I have done this before, in several arenas.  Cars, AM
transmitters, linear amplifiers, custom built test
equipment, etc.  IF you have BOTH
pieces that have been cut, you can match up the wire
colors and splice them together.  You will want to cut the
looms back on both ends so that your repairs don't
become so large that you can't get the loom back in
place.  You'll need to stagger your repair splices so that
you can get it back together.  That will require some
replacement wire, and lots of shrink tube.  Doing this will
be much easier that trying to recreate the harness.  I've
done that too, but the work involved here would be
excessive.  The splice route is the way to go.

If you have the original manual with all the wiring info, it
makes it easier to ID what goes where.

On 7 Aug 2020 at 8:58, Jamie Ostrowski wrote:


I bought a pair of 556 oscilloscopes from an electronics scrapper
that I am restoring. I think I'm able to get the rest of the parts
that were harvested from the person who sold them to the scrapper,
but unfortunately, they sliced through a couple of wire harnesses.
The point where they were sliced the harnesses are made up of what
looks like 24 gauge tinned wire and others look like maybe 20 gauge.
I'm trying to weigh whether I should splice the looms back together
or if I should re-wire. Re-wiring looks like it's going to be an
incredibly painful process that will take me literally probably 100
hours of work per scope. Just hunting down originally correct color
coding wires is going to be a nightmare, and then routing them
correctly and re-tying the looms......whew.

It's unbelievable how much work one snip of a wire cutter can
generate.

Has anyone gone down a path like this before in a restoration and do
you have any tips?

Fortunately I do have a third complete 556 that I can use as a model
to compare with.



John Goller, K9UWA & Jean Goller, N9PXF
Antique Radio Restorations
k9uwa@...
Visit our Web Site at:
http://www.JohnJeanAntiqueRadio.com
4836 Ranch Road
Leo, IN 46765
USA
1-260-637-6426


Re: eBay / PayPal Changes and our alternatives

DaveC <davec2468@...>
 

Cubans?

Dave

... What totally shocks me given the high percentage of Cubans that were affected, is that he is still walking around.CmdrDick


Re: Cut wiring harness

kim.herron@sbcglobal.net
 

Yes I have done this before, in several arenas. Cars, AM
transmitters, linear amplifiers, custom built test
equipment, etc. IF you have BOTH
pieces that have been cut, you can match up the wire
colors and splice them together. You will want to cut the
looms back on both ends so that your repairs don't
become so large that you can't get the loom back in
place. You'll need to stagger your repair splices so that
you can get it back together. That will require some
replacement wire, and lots of shrink tube. Doing this will
be much easier that trying to recreate the harness. I've
done that too, but the work involved here would be
excessive. The splice route is the way to go.

If you have the original manual with all the wiring info, it
makes it easier to ID what goes where.

On 7 Aug 2020 at 8:58, Jamie Ostrowski wrote:


I bought a pair of 556 oscilloscopes from an electronics scrapper
that I am restoring. I think I'm able to get the rest of the parts
that were harvested from the person who sold them to the scrapper,
but unfortunately, they sliced through a couple of wire harnesses.
The point where they were sliced the harnesses are made up of what
looks like 24 gauge tinned wire and others look like maybe 20 gauge.
I'm trying to weigh whether I should splice the looms back together
or if I should re-wire. Re-wiring looks like it's going to be an
incredibly painful process that will take me literally probably 100
hours of work per scope. Just hunting down originally correct color
coding wires is going to be a nightmare, and then routing them
correctly and re-tying the looms......whew.

It's unbelievable how much work one snip of a wire cutter can
generate.

Has anyone gone down a path like this before in a restoration and do
you have any tips?

Fortunately I do have a third complete 556 that I can use as a model
to compare with.



John Goller, K9UWA & Jean Goller, N9PXF
Antique Radio Restorations
k9uwa@...
Visit our Web Site at:
http://www.JohnJeanAntiqueRadio.com
4836 Ranch Road
Leo, IN 46765
USA
1-260-637-6426


Cut wiring harness

Jamie Ostrowski
 

I bought a pair of 556 oscilloscopes from an electronics scrapper that I am restoring. I think I'm able to get the rest of the parts that were harvested from the person who sold them to the scrapper, but unfortunately, they sliced through a couple of wire harnesses. The point where they were sliced the harnesses are made up of what looks like 24 gauge tinned wire and others look like maybe 20 gauge. I'm trying to weigh whether I should splice the looms back together or if I should re-wire. Re-wiring looks like it's going to be an incredibly painful process that will take me literally probably 100 hours of work per scope. Just hunting down originally correct color coding wires is going to be a nightmare, and then routing them correctly and re-tying the looms......whew.

It's unbelievable how much work one snip of a wire cutter can generate.

Has anyone gone down a path like this before in a restoration and do you have any tips?

Fortunately I do have a third complete 556 that I can use as a model to compare with.


Re: TAS455 TAS465 SMPS 119-5024-00 (Astec AA18020) repair

ron roetzer
 

Although I have no direct knowledge of this power supply, I have worked on a number of SMPS. A MOV will always fail short, since it's purpose is to protect the line side semiconductors from a voltage surge. The part should be replaced with a 300V rated MOV. Littlefuse supplies a wide variety of parts. Just find the correct size (physical) part and go from there. https://www.littelfuse.com/products/varistors/radial-leaded.aspx Available from all the normal online suppliers.


Re: eBay / PayPal Changes and our alternatives

Dick Wilson at DiLette Sales <cmdrdick42@...>
 

Just as an added note, I read one article that added the brute, Carl Icahn to the mix.
https://www.paymentssource.com/"Four years after leading a charge to make PayPal more nimble by severing it from eBay, investor Carl Icahn is reportedly dissolving his investments in the payment company.Icahn originally pushed for eBay and PayPal to separate in 2014, arguing eBay's ownership of the payment company made other partners reluctant to collaborate with PayPal out of competitive concerns. Reuters reported the sale of Icahn's stake, as well as dumping his position in AIG.eBay's management initially pushed back against Icahn by arguing the auction/payment company tie-up was inseparable and noting eBay's earlier attempt to build its own payment engine failed. eBay also reported PayPal received most of its digital payments volume from eBay purchases. eBay initially purchased PayPal in 2002, beginning a long relationship of intertwined services.But the companies separated later in 2014, with PayPal's management changing its tune by trumpeting an independent PayPal's ability to quickly add new digital transaction technology and merchant partners to compete with Square, Amazon and Walmart as well as pursue its goal of supporting payments inside physical stores.That take turned out to be correct, as PayPal has reported strong earnings driven by its expanding Venmo P2P app and its Braintree software development business.PayPal and eBay had retained a nominal payment processing relationship, though that too has begun to wane, as eBay chose to gradually shift processing to Adyen over the next five years.Icahn, who dumped his eBay position after the PayPal split, has been gradually selling off his PayPal position more recently while adding to his positions in Herbalife and Hertz. Icahn's investing career dates to the 1980s, when he was known as a "corporate raider." ".Just as a reminder, Carl Icahn is the bloke responsible for the demise of Eastern Airlines and the dissolving of their employee retirement fund. He got hundreds of millions richer while thousands of employees futures were decimated. What totally shocks me given the high percentage of Cubans that were affected, is that he is still walking around.CmdrDick

On Thursday, August 6, 2020, 01:02:35 PM EDT, Steve Goldstein <steveg6@...> wrote:

PayPal was originally called Xoom - Elon Musk was one of the founders.
There's no relationship I know of to the present-day company with that
name.  Since interest rates were high when it started their plan was to
make money off the float of what people kept in their accounts - they
advertised "Always Free" or something like that.  They later changed their
name to PayPal and the fees started.  Then it was sold to eBay, and later
spun out again with some sort of arrangement remaining between the two
companies..


Re: looking for internal photos of Input RC Normalizer (067-0537-00)

Jared Cabot
 

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 07:58 PM, Colin Herbert wrote:


Further to Håkan's kind provision of this photo, apart from the fixed
capacitor and (1M0) resistor in parallel, the other side of the Normalizer has
an adjustable trimmer capacitor. If this is present, removal of the white
plastic cap on the opposite side (if present) should reveal the screwdriver
slot for its adjustment. If you cannot see a screwdriver slot, then the
trimmer is absent. Don't fiddle with the trimmer if it is present, check out
the instructions for the use and (possible) adjustment of Normalizers on
TekWiki.

While I note that this particular Normalizer is 15pF, all normalizers look
pretty much the same inside. The differences being the value of the
capacitance(s) and the words on the cover. I think all the resistors are 1M0.

There are a number of different models with differing capacitances; some
common, some less so. I received a "modified" Normalizer a little while ago
(it had been converted into an attenuator for some reason!) and the supplier
replaced it free of charge and with no argument. The peculiarity here is that
Normalizers for 47pF, 30pf, 24pf and 20 pf are relatively common, but the odd
values such as 15pf and 22pF seem to be butchered by some people. Why would
anyone want to modify an unusual Normalizer and not a more common one?

Colin.
Yeah, I have read through the manual and even made my own version too ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1fHyzJifiQ ).
The 15pF version is used on the 2445 and 2467 scopes I have here, one day I'll amass more as needs arise. Although, they are a pretty easy thing to DIY.

I have no idea why a standard metal-can crystal would have been connected between the input and output BNC's in mine.....


On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 07:30 PM, zenith5106 wrote:


www.hakanh.com/dl/temp/537.jpg
Perfect, exactly what I was looking for.

Much thanks! :)


Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

n4buq
 

When mine broke, it sheared the cylindrical part cleanly where the brass insert stopped (approximately where the taper begins). I was able to drill and tap a very short (maybe three or four threads deep) 4-40 hole in the tapered end and with a very short length of 4-40 threaded rod and ca glue, put the pieces back together. I had to remove a few threads from the stud as well since it bottomed out on the threaded rod, but it has all held for about a year now.

Just a thought in case you don't find a replacement.

BTW, that may have been broken before you tried to turn that shaft. In my case, I know I did not apply very much torque at all before I noticed it was just spinning and I'm pretty sure mine was already broken.

An alternative (if you have access to a lathe or someone who could make it for you, would be to make a replacement for that threaded, shouldered, stud but make the 4-40 end just a bit longer. Drill and tap the end of the tapered piece and then screw the entire length of the new stud in to both pieces and affix it all with ca glue. It won't twist as before (due to the glue) but it would be a stronger way to go. Just a thought.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Martin" <@musaeum>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Friday, August 7, 2020 2:07:56 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

That might become a "#me too" issue.

I add myself to the list of those that tried to turn the screw... I was too
eager to get the PSU out after one of the RIFAs went up in smoke.

I found the drawing in the files section, but do not have the tools do work
on such a part. Does someone has a model for a 3D-printer yet?

Anyone around Stuttgart / Germany with the proper tooling who might help me?

cheers
Martin




Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

DaveC <davec2468@...>
 

Martin,
Can you please provide a link to he location of these files? I looked in the group files and there aren’t many. I didn’t see anything relating to a collet.

Thanks,
Dave

On Aug 7, 2020, at 12:07 AM, Martin <@musaeum> wrote:

That might become a "#me too" issue.

I add myself to the list of those that tried to turn the screw... I was too eager to get the PSU out after one of the RIFAs went up in smoke.

I found the drawing in the files section, but do not have the tools do work on such a part. Does someone has a model for a 3D-printer yet?

Anyone around Stuttgart / Germany with the proper tooling who might help me?

cheers
Martin



Re: looking for internal photos of Input RC Normalizer (067-0537-00)

Colin Herbert
 

Further to Håkan's kind provision of this photo, apart from the fixed capacitor and (1M0) resistor in parallel, the other side of the Normalizer has an adjustable trimmer capacitor. If this is present, removal of the white plastic cap on the opposite side (if present) should reveal the screwdriver slot for its adjustment. If you cannot see a screwdriver slot, then the trimmer is absent. Don't fiddle with the trimmer if it is present, check out the instructions for the use and (possible) adjustment of Normalizers on TekWiki.

While I note that this particular Normalizer is 15pF, all normalizers look pretty much the same inside. The differences being the value of the capacitance(s) and the words on the cover. I think all the resistors are 1M0.

There are a number of different models with differing capacitances; some common, some less so. I received a "modified" Normalizer a little while ago (it had been converted into an attenuator for some reason!) and the supplier replaced it free of charge and with no argument. The peculiarity here is that Normalizers for 47pF, 30pf, 24pf and 20 pf are relatively common, but the odd values such as 15pf and 22pF seem to be butchered by some people. Why would anyone want to modify an unusual Normalizer and not a more common one?

Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of zenith5106
Sent: 07 August 2020 11:31
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] looking for internal photos of Input RC Normalizer (067-0537-00)

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 09:45 AM, Jared Cabot wrote:


Does anyone here have an Input RC Normalizer to hand they can open the lid and
take some happy snaps for me
OK, find it here: www.hakanh.com/dl/temp/537.jpg

/Håkan