Date   

Re: 475 questions

ehsjr
 

On 6/21/2020 9:02 PM, ciclista41 via groups.io wrote:
Hi folks,
Here's where I'm up to. All six large capacitors have been replaced, along with the two tantalums that I pulled, thinking they were bad based on in-circuit tests which turned out to be wrong--they were good. Made sure I had correct polarity.
The large capacitors were good except for C1412 and C1414. C1414 was the worst. It reads 0L on my Fluke 87-V for capacitance (same as shorting the probes together). My "transistor tester" shows it as 12.59 nF with 14% vloss. The C1412 still shows 399 μF (rated 360 μF), but the "tester" shows 347 nF, 6.5 Ω ESR, and 3.8% vloss.
Okay, so in replacing all these, I used Alex Cuoghi's PCB's. I wanted to make sure I hadn't created any shorts due to poor soldering (my soldering looks pretty good to me, but just being careful), so after soldering the four pins into the PCB's, I checked for continuity among the ground pins to the via where the negative of the cap goes, and from the positive pin to the positive via. All good in all cases. Then I soldered the caps in place, followed by a re-checking of appropriate continuities. Finally, I soldered the PCB pins to the A9 board, making sure each was in its appropriate location and rechecking for continuity and no shorting. Then I noticed that I had not replaced the CR1412 rectifier before installing the C1412, so had to pull that again, install the CR1412, then reinstall the C1412 cap. Again checked for appropriate continuity and lack of shorts.
Time to plug the scope in again. I had a 200W bulb in series with the plug as a current limiter. Switched on the scope, and immediately switched it off again, as the bulb lit up brightly and there were sparks at the C1412 where soldered to the board. Sounded like frying bacon, but this is not supposed to be a MIG welder! Figured I had somehow created a short with my soldering, so pulled the C1412 again. No sign of any burning, so sign of solder out of place, everything still looked and measured as expected. Even pulled the cap from the PCB with no sign of anything wrong. Shrugged my shoulders and put it back in the board. Tried again with the same result. Pulled again (I know, poor board, but it seems to be handling it all gracefully). Again, so sign of my having screwed anything up. Let it sit for a day, hoping I'd think of some reason it could be my fault that there was a short. Full disclosure, I may have dropped a screw through the hole in the middle of the bottom of the board, but I don't think so. Turned the scope every which way while shaking it and there was no rattle and nothing fell out. The only other thing I could think of was that I may have cooked the CR1412 with soldering it, but I doubt that, and it did measure as good before I put it back in.
So, I'm guessing that there is a short somewhere in one of the boards, and the fact that the C1414, which is in series with the C1412 that gets so upset when I switch on the scope, was protected from that effect by the fact that the old C1414 measures in the MΩ range, and maybe the short was what killed that capacitor in the first place.
Any ideas?
I don't yet have a Variac, but one should arrive in the mail tomorrow or the next day. Alternatively, I have a DC power supply that is fixed current or fixed voltage with up to 10A and 30V. Not sure where to feed sub 5V into the circuit to try to find the fault. Also I tried pulling all of the power connections to other boards and turning it on, but still got a sizzle at the C1412.
Bruce
CR1412 installed backwards?
Ed


Re: 585A: things to look out for?

Sean Turner
 

This is wrong...I keep getting turned around in the heater wiring forgetting that it is connected to ground...

Sean

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 07:29 PM, @0culus wrote:


Quick update: I tried a power up with the time delay tube removed to
permanently disable B+. It tried to start but popped the fuse shortly. I went
looking around the 100V rail and the heater supply, and found a suspected
shorted filter cap in the heater supply, C786 (100uF). It reads basically a
dead short (couple of ohms) at DC on an ohmmeter from + to ground. I have not
removed it from circuit yet, but various tests in-circuit are not promising
for this cap.

Sean


Re: 585A: things to look out for?

Sean Turner
 

Quick update: I tried a power up with the time delay tube removed to permanently disable B+. It tried to start but popped the fuse shortly. I went looking around the 100V rail and the heater supply, and found a suspected shorted filter cap in the heater supply, C786 (100uF). It reads basically a dead short (couple of ohms) at DC on an ohmmeter from + to ground. I have not removed it from circuit yet, but various tests in-circuit are not promising for this cap.

Sean


Re: 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

Roy Thistle
 

On Sat, Jun 20, 2020 at 06:45 PM, <henasau@hotmail.com> wrote:


I need to program Intel D27011
I need to program them too. (I'd be satisfied with something that will just do these paged chips.)
In another thread, I raised the point that I am too cheep to pay hundreds of U.S. dollars for a box (admittedly, usually with a snazzy logo), a zif socket, and a few dollars worth of semiconductors... that makes up the hardware of these old programmers. Most of the value, and the consumer's purchase cost was in/and for the software. And that's usually free now, for these old serial/parallel port programmers (the ones that do 27011)
I was asking in that older thread... what about constructing a programmer, just for 27011?
If that's not attractive... because most of you have programmers that can program 27011? then why not a hardware emulator with the same approximate footprint as the original chip?


Re: 475 questions

ciclista41@...
 

Hi folks,

Here's where I'm up to. All six large capacitors have been replaced, along with the two tantalums that I pulled, thinking they were bad based on in-circuit tests which turned out to be wrong--they were good. Made sure I had correct polarity.

The large capacitors were good except for C1412 and C1414. C1414 was the worst. It reads 0L on my Fluke 87-V for capacitance (same as shorting the probes together). My "transistor tester" shows it as 12.59 nF with 14% vloss. The C1412 still shows 399 μF (rated 360 μF), but the "tester" shows 347 nF, 6.5 Ω ESR, and 3.8% vloss.

Okay, so in replacing all these, I used Alex Cuoghi's PCB's. I wanted to make sure I hadn't created any shorts due to poor soldering (my soldering looks pretty good to me, but just being careful), so after soldering the four pins into the PCB's, I checked for continuity among the ground pins to the via where the negative of the cap goes, and from the positive pin to the positive via. All good in all cases. Then I soldered the caps in place, followed by a re-checking of appropriate continuities. Finally, I soldered the PCB pins to the A9 board, making sure each was in its appropriate location and rechecking for continuity and no shorting. Then I noticed that I had not replaced the CR1412 rectifier before installing the C1412, so had to pull that again, install the CR1412, then reinstall the C1412 cap. Again checked for appropriate continuity and lack of shorts.

Time to plug the scope in again. I had a 200W bulb in series with the plug as a current limiter. Switched on the scope, and immediately switched it off again, as the bulb lit up brightly and there were sparks at the C1412 where soldered to the board. Sounded like frying bacon, but this is not supposed to be a MIG welder! Figured I had somehow created a short with my soldering, so pulled the C1412 again. No sign of any burning, so sign of solder out of place, everything still looked and measured as expected. Even pulled the cap from the PCB with no sign of anything wrong. Shrugged my shoulders and put it back in the board. Tried again with the same result. Pulled again (I know, poor board, but it seems to be handling it all gracefully). Again, so sign of my having screwed anything up. Let it sit for a day, hoping I'd think of some reason it could be my fault that there was a short. Full disclosure, I may have dropped a screw through the hole in the middle of the bottom of the board, but I don't think so. Turned the scope every which way while shaking it and there was no rattle and nothing fell out. The only other thing I could think of was that I may have cooked the CR1412 with soldering it, but I doubt that, and it did measure as good before I put it back in.

So, I'm guessing that there is a short somewhere in one of the boards, and the fact that the C1414, which is in series with the C1412 that gets so upset when I switch on the scope, was protected from that effect by the fact that the old C1414 measures in the MΩ range, and maybe the short was what killed that capacitor in the first place.

Any ideas?

I don't yet have a Variac, but one should arrive in the mail tomorrow or the next day. Alternatively, I have a DC power supply that is fixed current or fixed voltage with up to 10A and 30V. Not sure where to feed sub 5V into the circuit to try to find the fault. Also I tried pulling all of the power connections to other boards and turning it on, but still got a sizzle at the C1412.

Bruce


7T11 and 7S11 are gone

Sergey Kubushyn
 

Got the payment so it is no longer available.

---
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Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

Limited RBW performance isn't a deal breaker for spectrum analyzers
nowadays, though of course it's always nice to have it. What you can do is
use the SA for broadband analysis (checking for harmonics and spurs), and
use an SDR to have a closer look at problems near the frequency of interest
(IMD distortion, etc). There are a number of good and affordable SDR
options out there that will be fine additions to your test bench, and you
can also use them as radios when you're not at the bench!

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 6:43 PM David Berlind <david@berlind.org> wrote:

Hi everyone. I am the member who originally kicked this topic off and
wanted to say thank you for all the information that you've provided to me.
You've once again demonstrated to me how incredibly valuable this forum is
and how wonderfully generous many of you are with your time and expertise
and even your gear. Even if you didn't provide me with all the details for
me to fully comprehend your answers, you provided me with enough so that
Google could help me do the rest (in most cases). I've received several
messages off-forum offering to donate their gear to me if I can pick up
(unfortunately all out of reasonable driving reach for me). But thank you
so much for your offers. Here are some things I learned:

1. The expense associated with spectrum analyzers is not an anomaly
associated with some of the for sale listings that I originally spotted. As
Dennis T pointed out, this may turn out to be the most expensive
acquisition in my lab. This is OK with me. It may just mean I wait longer
than I originally hoped to save up for one.
2. Resolution bandwith (RBW, an acronym I did not know prior to this
conversation) will matter to my application (for example to observe
sidebands and the various mixer by products).
3. As a greenhorn looking to get his feet wet with spectrum analysis, I
might be better off with the economically attractive software defined radio
(SDR) option or the nanoVNA approach. I've been using Google with various
degrees of success to understand exactly how both work as potential
substitutes. I would not have known to look for these before.
4. That I should experiment with the FFT option of my TDS 680B
oscilloscope as a part of my exploration (something that I would never have
thought to do)
5. That I have to take extra special care when using a spectrum analyzer
-- that it's super easy to make a mistake and blow up the sensitive inputs.
6. That some spectrum analyzers have so much packed into a small space
that fixing a used one can be very challenging. It's something to think
about before acquiring a used device that may be in need of immediate
service because of its age
7. There are important differences between the various Tek 7000 plug-in
SAs that should be appreciated before just buying any one of them and there
are other manufacturers of SAs worth considering. I'll stop there since
this is the Tek forum (and am glad someone moved a fork of the conversation
over to the HP/Agilent forum for an equally educational conversation of
alternative options).

I could go on, but hopefully you get the point. Ever since joining this
forum, its members have been so helpful in helping me to advance my
understanding of electronics even when I don't know what it is I don't
know. Not just in answer my posts, but other posts too. Yes, through a
Tektronix lens which is fine since I now have six Tek scopes and a 577
curve tracer. It's also fine because I realize that some of the most
knowledgeable electronics experts in the world are right here on this
forum. The Tektronix pedigree is amazing. In addition to being thankful,
I've done some to pay it forward, given away some plug-ins and parts to
other members, and helped in other ways. I only hope it's enough given what
I've gotten out of it.

Thanks again to all you. I will continue my SA studies because of your
help and maybe a few years from now, I'll be able to help some other new
member find their way with a new endeavor.

David




Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Harvey White
 

Keep asking questions of this (or the HP) group.  I learned without such a resource, it did make things a bit more difficult. As I said, I'm not the RF type.  If you're exploring, then starting off small and investigating what RF Means to You (tm). is a very useful thing.  Figure out what you need at this moment, leave a decent path to the future, and allow for change.  Your needs may well change.

Harvey

On 6/21/2020 6:43 PM, David Berlind wrote:
Hi everyone. I am the member who originally kicked this topic off and wanted to say thank you for all the information that you've provided to me. You've once again demonstrated to me how incredibly valuable this forum is and how wonderfully generous many of you are with your time and expertise and even your gear. Even if you didn't provide me with all the details for me to fully comprehend your answers, you provided me with enough so that Google could help me do the rest (in most cases). I've received several messages off-forum offering to donate their gear to me if I can pick up (unfortunately all out of reasonable driving reach for me). But thank you so much for your offers. Here are some things I learned:

1. The expense associated with spectrum analyzers is not an anomaly associated with some of the for sale listings that I originally spotted. As Dennis T pointed out, this may turn out to be the most expensive acquisition in my lab. This is OK with me. It may just mean I wait longer than I originally hoped to save up for one.
2. Resolution bandwith (RBW, an acronym I did not know prior to this conversation) will matter to my application (for example to observe sidebands and the various mixer by products).
3. As a greenhorn looking to get his feet wet with spectrum analysis, I might be better off with the economically attractive software defined radio (SDR) option or the nanoVNA approach. I've been using Google with various degrees of success to understand exactly how both work as potential substitutes. I would not have known to look for these before.
4. That I should experiment with the FFT option of my TDS 680B oscilloscope as a part of my exploration (something that I would never have thought to do)
5. That I have to take extra special care when using a spectrum analyzer -- that it's super easy to make a mistake and blow up the sensitive inputs.
6. That some spectrum analyzers have so much packed into a small space that fixing a used one can be very challenging. It's something to think about before acquiring a used device that may be in need of immediate service because of its age
7. There are important differences between the various Tek 7000 plug-in SAs that should be appreciated before just buying any one of them and there are other manufacturers of SAs worth considering. I'll stop there since this is the Tek forum (and am glad someone moved a fork of the conversation over to the HP/Agilent forum for an equally educational conversation of alternative options).

I could go on, but hopefully you get the point. Ever since joining this forum, its members have been so helpful in helping me to advance my understanding of electronics even when I don't know what it is I don't know. Not just in answer my posts, but other posts too. Yes, through a Tektronix lens which is fine since I now have six Tek scopes and a 577 curve tracer. It's also fine because I realize that some of the most knowledgeable electronics experts in the world are right here on this forum. The Tektronix pedigree is amazing. In addition to being thankful, I've done some to pay it forward, given away some plug-ins and parts to other members, and helped in other ways. I only hope it's enough given what I've gotten out of it.

Thanks again to all you. I will continue my SA studies because of your help and maybe a few years from now, I'll be able to help some other new member find their way with a new endeavor.

David



Re: Spectrum Analyzer

Roy Thistle
 

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 04:21 PM, Reginald Beardsley wrote:


I recommend
Well I recommend, everyone posting to/reading this thread should read Dennis Tilman's excellent post, about the purpose of this topic ( This is a new thread on the same topic? I can't even tell anymore.)
I recon, if there is no answers to at lest most of the questions Dennis poses,there... this discussion is somewhat of a rag chew in an echo chamber.
I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that.
After all, TekScopes has all the bandwidth and storage... and we have all the bandwidth and time for this. Right?


Re: Spectrum Analyzer

Reginald Beardsley
 

I recommend taking a look at the SDRplay RSPdx. I've got an RSP2 and am quite pleased with it. I've not fired up the SA app for it yet, but it looks as if it's a pretty inexpensive solution.

I have played with some of the RTL-SDR SA apps. They're pretty good, though 8 bits limits the dynamic range a lot. The RSPdx is 14 bits.

I have the pleasure of an 8560A w/ TG and an 8566B, so I typically use the 8560A as it is set up for use. The 88566B is sitting on a mover's dolly along with about 16 ft of gear in my dining room awaiting a shop to hold it all.

Have Fun!
Reg


Re: Spectrum Analyzer

David Berlind
 

Here's a video of Alan Wolke using a 1401A with a Tek 2465A.

Pretty cool.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Y6ji0QBsww


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

David Berlind
 

Hi everyone. I am the member who originally kicked this topic off and wanted to say thank you for all the information that you've provided to me. You've once again demonstrated to me how incredibly valuable this forum is and how wonderfully generous many of you are with your time and expertise and even your gear. Even if you didn't provide me with all the details for me to fully comprehend your answers, you provided me with enough so that Google could help me do the rest (in most cases). I've received several messages off-forum offering to donate their gear to me if I can pick up (unfortunately all out of reasonable driving reach for me). But thank you so much for your offers. Here are some things I learned:

1. The expense associated with spectrum analyzers is not an anomaly associated with some of the for sale listings that I originally spotted. As Dennis T pointed out, this may turn out to be the most expensive acquisition in my lab. This is OK with me. It may just mean I wait longer than I originally hoped to save up for one.
2. Resolution bandwith (RBW, an acronym I did not know prior to this conversation) will matter to my application (for example to observe sidebands and the various mixer by products).
3. As a greenhorn looking to get his feet wet with spectrum analysis, I might be better off with the economically attractive software defined radio (SDR) option or the nanoVNA approach. I've been using Google with various degrees of success to understand exactly how both work as potential substitutes. I would not have known to look for these before.
4. That I should experiment with the FFT option of my TDS 680B oscilloscope as a part of my exploration (something that I would never have thought to do)
5. That I have to take extra special care when using a spectrum analyzer -- that it's super easy to make a mistake and blow up the sensitive inputs.
6. That some spectrum analyzers have so much packed into a small space that fixing a used one can be very challenging. It's something to think about before acquiring a used device that may be in need of immediate service because of its age
7. There are important differences between the various Tek 7000 plug-in SAs that should be appreciated before just buying any one of them and there are other manufacturers of SAs worth considering. I'll stop there since this is the Tek forum (and am glad someone moved a fork of the conversation over to the HP/Agilent forum for an equally educational conversation of alternative options).

I could go on, but hopefully you get the point. Ever since joining this forum, its members have been so helpful in helping me to advance my understanding of electronics even when I don't know what it is I don't know. Not just in answer my posts, but other posts too. Yes, through a Tektronix lens which is fine since I now have six Tek scopes and a 577 curve tracer. It's also fine because I realize that some of the most knowledgeable electronics experts in the world are right here on this forum. The Tektronix pedigree is amazing. In addition to being thankful, I've done some to pay it forward, given away some plug-ins and parts to other members, and helped in other ways. I only hope it's enough given what I've gotten out of it.

Thanks again to all you. I will continue my SA studies because of your help and maybe a few years from now, I'll be able to help some other new member find their way with a new endeavor.

David


Re: 2% Silver

Randy.AB9GO
 

I purchased a 1 lb roll of Multicore 2% at of all things a farm equipment
show 4-5 years ago for $3.00! No one wanted because it was too thin. You
just never know where stuff like this is going to show up. I will probably
bite the bullet and buy a new roll when I need it. It makes some of the
prettiest joints you've ever seen. I use it on everything. On the other
end of the spectrum is lead free and unless I have to work on something
that is already lead free I'm just not buying it or using it. Awful awful
stuff.

randy.ab9go@gmail.com

This message sent to you from my mobile device via speech-to-text
technology.


Re: 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

A problem with the EMP line is that they never updated the drivers for most
of the products for any versions of Windows after XP. So you have to keep
around a legacy machine to run them. You can still get the software from
the Wayback Machine here:
https://web.archive.org/web/20070629040552/http://www.needhams.com/software-download.html
The software was last updated in 2006, so it won't be able to program any
devices newer than that.

Logical Devices picked up the EMP-21, Needham's flagship product, after
Needham's went under. They have continued to offer and support that, and it
has drivers for modern Windows versions all the way to Windows 10. But the
only software they have for the legacy Needham's products is even older
than the version you can get from the Wayback Machine.

I keep around an old XP system with a parallel port just to run my EMP-11.
I don't use it much, but it's not as if a computer of that vintage has any
significant market value.

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 5:28 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info> wrote:

I have an EMP-10 or 11 somewhere. Don't use it all that much. (at all),
more likely to use the prolog... However, if you don't have the
software, I can see if I still do. Think it may have more than one
programmer in the file.

Harvey




On 6/21/2020 5:08 PM, J. L. Trantham wrote:
As best I can tell, many of the Advin programmers can program this chip,
including the PILOT MVP and perhaps the PILOT 145.

Advin has the benefit of still offering their software for all their
'legacy' programmers.

https://www.advin.com/

BP Micro programmers will also program this chip, all the way back to
the EP-1140 which should be available for less than $50. Unfortunately,
when I recently looked at the BP Micro site, I was unable to find software
downloads for their old programmers. They have completely changed their
website.

https://bpmmicro.com/

In years past, there was a link to their software downloads. You had to
sign up and they would send you a password that allowed you to find it.
Now, I don't see a way to login but there is an option to sign up. I have
not done that but the software may still be available on their website. I
have stored most of the software for many of their programmers and I do
like how easy and intuitive their programmers and software are.
Unfortunately, if the software is not available for their 'legacy'
programmers, they pretty much become scrap. Hopefully, someone has an
archive of their software that can be shared and keep these programmers for
decades to come.

These old programmers require WinXP and a Parallel Port.

Good luck.

Joe



-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Chuck Harris
Sent: Saturday, June 20, 2020 11:27 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

I have two programmers that will burn the D27011:

One is an Advin U84+, which is hosted on the parallel port
of a DOS machine, and the other is a GTEK 9000A, which is
RS232 based.

I have programmed tons of them in the distant past.

And, yes, both have the part in their listings.

-Chuck Harris

henasau@hotmail.com wrote:
Thank you Chuck for quick response. Unfortunately I live in Australia.
This days shipping is over the top. Let's see if other solution
solution will come up.
What programmer are you using? Do you have D27011 listed?










Re: 2% Silver

John Ferguson
 

Those spools of solder are funny - in our sort of use they last a lifetime. I still have at least 80% of the spool I bought in 2005 to build my Elecraft K2-100 and the antenna tuner.  All the projects since then have been little - using a foot or two each.

john ferguson

On 6/21/20 5:27 PM, Reginald Beardsley via groups.io wrote:
I bought a spool of 2% silver solder in preparation for reviving a 545, but the 545 went away during a move from Dallas to Houston.

I still have the solder, so if anyone needs a few feet, email me with an address and I'll stick some in an envelope. While it seems highly unlikely I'll need the solder myself, I'm not very good at predicting the future. So I don't want to get rid of the whole roll. But for anyone other than someone with an OCD complex about restoring old tube era Tek gear 3 ft should be enough solder.

Have Fun!
Reg


Re: 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

Harvey White
 

I have an EMP-10 or 11 somewhere.  Don't use it all that much. (at all), more likely to use the prolog...  However, if you don't have the software, I can see if I still do.  Think it may have more than one programmer in the file.

Harvey

On 6/21/2020 5:08 PM, J. L. Trantham wrote:
As best I can tell, many of the Advin programmers can program this chip, including the PILOT MVP and perhaps the PILOT 145.

Advin has the benefit of still offering their software for all their 'legacy' programmers.

https://www.advin.com/

BP Micro programmers will also program this chip, all the way back to the EP-1140 which should be available for less than $50. Unfortunately, when I recently looked at the BP Micro site, I was unable to find software downloads for their old programmers. They have completely changed their website.

https://bpmmicro.com/

In years past, there was a link to their software downloads. You had to sign up and they would send you a password that allowed you to find it. Now, I don't see a way to login but there is an option to sign up. I have not done that but the software may still be available on their website. I have stored most of the software for many of their programmers and I do like how easy and intuitive their programmers and software are. Unfortunately, if the software is not available for their 'legacy' programmers, they pretty much become scrap. Hopefully, someone has an archive of their software that can be shared and keep these programmers for decades to come.

These old programmers require WinXP and a Parallel Port.

Good luck.

Joe



-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck Harris
Sent: Saturday, June 20, 2020 11:27 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

I have two programmers that will burn the D27011:

One is an Advin U84+, which is hosted on the parallel port
of a DOS machine, and the other is a GTEK 9000A, which is
RS232 based.

I have programmed tons of them in the distant past.

And, yes, both have the part in their listings.

-Chuck Harris

henasau@hotmail.com wrote:
Thank you Chuck for quick response. Unfortunately I live in Australia.
This days shipping is over the top. Let's see if other solution solution will come up.
What programmer are you using? Do you have D27011 listed?







Re: 2% Silver

Reginald Beardsley
 

I bought a spool of 2% silver solder in preparation for reviving a 545, but the 545 went away during a move from Dallas to Houston.

I still have the solder, so if anyone needs a few feet, email me with an address and I'll stick some in an envelope. While it seems highly unlikely I'll need the solder myself, I'm not very good at predicting the future. So I don't want to get rid of the whole roll. But for anyone other than someone with an OCD complex about restoring old tube era Tek gear 3 ft should be enough solder.

Have Fun!
Reg


Re: 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

J. L. Trantham
 

As best I can tell, many of the Advin programmers can program this chip, including the PILOT MVP and perhaps the PILOT 145.

Advin has the benefit of still offering their software for all their 'legacy' programmers.

https://www.advin.com/

BP Micro programmers will also program this chip, all the way back to the EP-1140 which should be available for less than $50. Unfortunately, when I recently looked at the BP Micro site, I was unable to find software downloads for their old programmers. They have completely changed their website.

https://bpmmicro.com/

In years past, there was a link to their software downloads. You had to sign up and they would send you a password that allowed you to find it. Now, I don't see a way to login but there is an option to sign up. I have not done that but the software may still be available on their website. I have stored most of the software for many of their programmers and I do like how easy and intuitive their programmers and software are. Unfortunately, if the software is not available for their 'legacy' programmers, they pretty much become scrap. Hopefully, someone has an archive of their software that can be shared and keep these programmers for decades to come.

These old programmers require WinXP and a Parallel Port.

Good luck.

Joe

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck Harris
Sent: Saturday, June 20, 2020 11:27 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2465B BIOS - D27011 Eprom programming

I have two programmers that will burn the D27011:

One is an Advin U84+, which is hosted on the parallel port
of a DOS machine, and the other is a GTEK 9000A, which is
RS232 based.

I have programmed tons of them in the distant past.

And, yes, both have the part in their listings.

-Chuck Harris

henasau@hotmail.com wrote:
Thank you Chuck for quick response. Unfortunately I live in Australia.
This days shipping is over the top. Let's see if other solution solution will come up.
What programmer are you using? Do you have D27011 listed?




Re: 2% Silver

J Mcvein
 

Just like the clipped in tuning tools, extender cards and Allen wrenches, the
little solder spools end up in the toolbox of the first tech who works on it.
The scrap value of a Tek item is that the wiring strips away from the Al
chassis so easily. Ooh..And all those audio triodes!

JimMc

-----Original Message-----
From: "stevenhorii" <sonodocsch@gmail.com>
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 4:00pm
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2% Silver



I have heard that the major reason that the small spool of solder in the
500-series Tek scopes was usually gone because of its silver content. A
scrapper once told me that the ceramic terminal strips that Tek used had
silver fused to the grooves and was a reason that some scrappers would buy
up the older Tek scopes. I'm not sure the labor to retrieve that silver
would be worth it, but some scrappers went through the trouble.

The couple of spools of silver-bearing solder that I have I purchased
surplus years ago. I don't recall if Kester or Multicore had the silver
content listed or if you needed to know the Kester product number to figure
it out.

Steve H.

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 3:39 PM snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Boy am I happy I have my spools of Radio Shack Silver Solder!

Hoarding pays off, kids!




Re: 5223 dot on screen and 5A48 second channel tied positive - Completed Repair is on YouTube

Jim Ford
 

Great, FAZ! I'm gratified to hear that some youngsters are interested in analog electronics.

Jim Ford

------ Original Message ------
From: "FAZ" <stephengfazio@gmail.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 6/20/2020 9:15:18 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] 5223 dot on screen and 5A48 second channel tied positive - Completed Repair is on YouTube

A high school student told me about his tesla coil he made and his small Geiger counter he said NASA sent up on a cube sat. I felt prompted to give him an extra 5223 I had around from a Cornell lab that shut down, but had to make some repairs first.

He's gotta be sixteen. I got my first couple of scopes, a 7704 and 7904 when I was sixteen, and they only half worked lol. Well now I'm 20 and am an EE undergrad. It would've been nice if somebody arrived on my doorstep and gifted me a scope and probes when I was his age, so I figured I could make that happen for somebody else.

Here's the link to the 15 minute video of the repairs.
https://youtu.be/yolXd4TDT-I
Enjoy!

I have some 7000 series plugins I'll have to take a look at as well


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