Date   

Re: Some interesting Nuvistor information

n4buq
 

AMECO used them in their amateur amplifiers:

https://mercari-images.global.ssl.fastly.net/photos/m19950079294_1.jpg?1582482382

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Knoppow" <dickburk@ix.netcom.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2020 5:51:42 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Some interesting Nuvistor information

   FWIW, Drake used compactron sweep tubes in several
transmitters. My memory is not clear but I believe Boonton used
Nuvistors in late versions of the RX Meter. My late lamented RX
meter had solder in tubes, I've forgotten what they were called.

On 6/18/2020 3:44 PM, Eric Schumacher wrote:
Steve
When I read CEI my interest perked up. Do you have any documentation that
you would share on either the CEI ST2045-2 or the Aydin Vector
RLS-2000A receivers, particularly the AV since mine doesn't work and
the construction is formidable for a hobbyist to work on.

To continue the thread: The 1968 Heathkit HW-17 2meter transceiver used
Compactrons in the transmitter section and FETs in the front end.
73 Eric WB6KCN@sbcglobal.net


-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
stevenhorii
Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2020 8:52 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Some interesting Nuvistor information

Jeff,

I have a series of various telemetry receivers - mostly DEI and Microdyne.
These are all solid-state as far as I know (the ones I've opened up). I
have a couple of oddball Microdyne 1100 series plug-ins (most came from Ron
Baublitz at US Surplus). These are VLF and a friend told me he thought they
might be for telephone interception. I think these came from one of the US
security agencies. The others are mostly S-band and were ex-NASA stuff. A
couple of the Microdyne mainframes in odd paint/anodize colors (all black
and one a dark blue). I think I have an old Nems-Clark somewhere - I'll
have to see if it has Nuvistors in it.

The other oddball - I think of them as odd since I was used to the classic
octal and the miniature 7- and 9-pin tubes - were the ones with more pins
and used in TV sets prior to the change to all solid-state. I don't recall
what these were called but they were fairly "squat" shaped and had more
pins than the miniature ones - maybe 11 or 12 pins? I found a photo of a
12-pin one here:

http://oddmix.com/tube7/14br11_ge_zenith.html

Have you ever seen these in anything other than vintage TVs? I don't think
Tek ever used them. Others on this list might know.

Steve H



On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 10:02 AM Jeff Kruth via groups.io <kmec=
aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have read several times in the thread that Nuvistors do not seem to fail
or get weak. This has not been my experience with them.

As one of the largest collectors of WJ & CEI "spook" radios, I have worked
on hundreds of pieces of their gear. The original company, Communications
Electronics Inc, founded by RE Grimm, used Nuvistors extensively in the
products made from the early '60's up into the mid to late 70's. (Along
with Mallory Inductuners!, more TV stuff) They used them in the 900
series,
the 700 series and the famous RS-111 and its military variant, the URR-52,
among others. BTW, NEMS-Clarke & Defense Electronics also used them in
their telemetry radios7 IIRC, the types they used were 8058, 7587 and
6CW4,
for RF amps, IF amps and LO, respectively. Some 7586's as well. The 8058
&
7587 were prone to getting weak and all reception stopped! I have also
found bad 6CW4's but rarely.For a long time 8058 were un-obtanium for me.
Many years after I really needed them I got a stash from cleaning out WJ.
Such is life. YMMV Jeff Kruth ________________ In a message
dated 6/18/2020 12:27:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io writes: I read a history of them several months
ago, but can not recall where
I found it. The internal structure and envelope were manufactured in
the atmosphere. The rim of the ceramic base was metalized so it would
adhere to brazing. The components were then heated to outgas, then
brazed closed, in a very high vacuum chamber. A getter was not used
because the outgassing process cleaned the components very well. My
experience has been that they are very long lived. The circuitry in
consumer equipment may have also been designed so an aging Nuvistor
would still give good performance, I have never seen any change in
results from replacing a well aged one in a TV or FM receiver, even if
they tested marginally. The low voltage version used in a Tek scope,
however does get weak with time and can have catastropic effect on the
operation of the scope.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 6/17/20 10:00 AM, snapdiode via groups.io wrote:
I just think Nuvistors are cool. Any information on how they were made
is interesting to me.
I've heard they were made in a high vacuum chamber with the assembly
machinery in the vacuum chamber.
There is no exhaust port on a Nuvistor.
I also wonder if there is a getter in there, or if the metal case itself
somehow acts as a getter.










--
Richard Knoppow
dickburk@ix.netcom.com
WB6KBL





Re: In Defense of the 7A19 + Ode to the 555 Triple Nickel

 

Hi Randy,
The trace sharpness was a hallmark of Tek scopes. The increased bandwidth, high writing rate, and very fast sweep speeds of the 7000 series necessitated higher acceleration voltages. 7000 CRTs would have to be so long (up to 7') they would be impractical unless a way could be found to solve this problem.
The solution Tek came up with was the Domed (Expansion) Mesh which unfortunately expands the beam width.
It was an engineering tradeoff.

The 7104 CRT does not use an domed mesh. It uses a scan expansion lens and a spot demagnification lens.
You can read more about all the tradeoffs that have to be taken into account here
https://vintagetek.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Electronic-Design-Jan-18-1979.pdf
and here
https://vintagetek.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Tekscope_1979_V11_N1.pdf

Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Newman
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2020 8:58 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] In Defense of the 7A19 + Ode to the 555 Triple Nickel

Hi Dennis. Just had to chime in on the 555 bandwagon. While it is not (by far) the fastest scope I own, it is in ways the most impressive, however it’s feature I most appreciate is it’s clear fine-line trace. Mine also has the purple-blue phosphor (which, if I remember correctly is the one especially suited to photographic use).
I have used 16GHz Tek DSO’s at work, which are cool, but still love my 555.





--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Tekniques Vol. 4 No 8, Pages 10, 11, 16

 

It is pretty clear that the articles in Tekniques were written by programmers for programmers or for people that understood software.
This is the first clue I had that ANY publication Tek produced had any code in it at all.
I have my fingers crossed that there was a similar publication for the 7854 because there were so many amazing things it could if you understood programming.
Anyone familiar with software would have jumped at the chance to take advantage of the software capabilities of this scope.

I once went through every issue of EDN, Electronics, and all the other electronics magazines from the time the 7854 was introduced until 10 years later looking for software routines for the 7854.
I found absolutely nothing!

EEs seemed to be terrified of programming back then.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Clark Foley
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2020 9:55 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tekniques Vol. 4 No 8, Pages 10, 11, 16

Dennis,

I received a very good scan of the document from Vintage Tek. They used a higher resolution for the small print of the 405x listing for the 7854 screen copy. I forwarded a copy to Kurt R for his web site.

Clark





--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Some interesting Nuvistor information

Richard Knoppow
 

FWIW, Drake used compactron sweep tubes in several transmitters. My memory is not clear but I believe Boonton used Nuvistors in late versions of the RX Meter. My late lamented RX meter had solder in tubes, I've forgotten what they were called.

On 6/18/2020 3:44 PM, Eric Schumacher wrote:
Steve
When I read CEI my interest perked up. Do you have any documentation that you would share on either the CEI ST2045-2 or the Aydin Vector RLS-2000A receivers, particularly the AV since mine doesn't work and the construction is formidable for a hobbyist to work on.

To continue the thread: The 1968 Heathkit HW-17 2meter transceiver used Compactrons in the transmitter section and FETs in the front end.
73 Eric WB6KCN@sbcglobal.net


-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of stevenhorii
Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2020 8:52 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Some interesting Nuvistor information

Jeff,

I have a series of various telemetry receivers - mostly DEI and Microdyne.
These are all solid-state as far as I know (the ones I've opened up). I
have a couple of oddball Microdyne 1100 series plug-ins (most came from Ron
Baublitz at US Surplus). These are VLF and a friend told me he thought they
might be for telephone interception. I think these came from one of the US
security agencies. The others are mostly S-band and were ex-NASA stuff. A
couple of the Microdyne mainframes in odd paint/anodize colors (all black
and one a dark blue). I think I have an old Nems-Clark somewhere - I'll
have to see if it has Nuvistors in it.

The other oddball - I think of them as odd since I was used to the classic
octal and the miniature 7- and 9-pin tubes - were the ones with more pins
and used in TV sets prior to the change to all solid-state. I don't recall
what these were called but they were fairly "squat" shaped and had more
pins than the miniature ones - maybe 11 or 12 pins? I found a photo of a
12-pin one here:

http://oddmix.com/tube7/14br11_ge_zenith.html

Have you ever seen these in anything other than vintage TVs? I don't think
Tek ever used them. Others on this list might know.

Steve H



On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 10:02 AM Jeff Kruth via groups.io <kmec=
aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have read several times in the thread that Nuvistors do not seem to fail
or get weak. This has not been my experience with them.

As one of the largest collectors of WJ & CEI "spook" radios, I have worked
on hundreds of pieces of their gear. The original company, Communications
Electronics Inc, founded by RE Grimm, used Nuvistors extensively in the
products made from the early '60's up into the mid to late 70's. (Along
with Mallory Inductuners!, more TV stuff) They used them in the 900 series,
the 700 series and the famous RS-111 and its military variant, the URR-52,
among others. BTW, NEMS-Clarke & Defense Electronics also used them in
their telemetry radios7 IIRC, the types they used were 8058, 7587 and 6CW4,
for RF amps, IF amps and LO, respectively. Some 7586's as well. The 8058 &
7587 were prone to getting weak and all reception stopped! I have also
found bad 6CW4's but rarely.For a long time 8058 were un-obtanium for me.
Many years after I really needed them I got a stash from cleaning out WJ.
Such is life. YMMV Jeff Kruth ________________ In a message
dated 6/18/2020 12:27:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io writes: I read a history of them several months
ago, but can not recall where
I found it. The internal structure and envelope were manufactured in
the atmosphere. The rim of the ceramic base was metalized so it would
adhere to brazing. The components were then heated to outgas, then
brazed closed, in a very high vacuum chamber. A getter was not used
because the outgassing process cleaned the components very well. My
experience has been that they are very long lived. The circuitry in
consumer equipment may have also been designed so an aging Nuvistor
would still give good performance, I have never seen any change in
results from replacing a well aged one in a TV or FM receiver, even if
they tested marginally. The low voltage version used in a Tek scope,
however does get weak with time and can have catastropic effect on the
operation of the scope.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 6/17/20 10:00 AM, snapdiode via groups.io wrote:
I just think Nuvistors are cool. Any information on how they were made
is interesting to me.
I've heard they were made in a high vacuum chamber with the assembly
machinery in the vacuum chamber.
There is no exhaust port on a Nuvistor.
I also wonder if there is a getter in there, or if the metal case itself
somehow acts as a getter.









--
Richard Knoppow
dickburk@ix.netcom.com
WB6KBL


Re: Tektronix 2246 flickering screen, ch2 not working.

grusus@...
 

Thanks Wallydoc.
I will check it tomorrow.
I checked only q809& q810 and resistors around. They seems good.
U801 is some kind of feedback and logically if it is bad it is pulling everything down. I overlooked that.
Many thanks. :-)


Re: Some interesting Nuvistor information

Eric Schumacher
 

Steve
When I read CEI my interest perked up. Do you have any documentation that you would share on either the CEI ST2045-2 or the Aydin Vector RLS-2000A receivers, particularly the AV since mine doesn't work and the construction is formidable for a hobbyist to work on.

To continue the thread: The 1968 Heathkit HW-17 2meter transceiver used Compactrons in the transmitter section and FETs in the front end.
73 Eric WB6KCN@sbcglobal.net

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of stevenhorii
Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2020 8:52 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Some interesting Nuvistor information

Jeff,

I have a series of various telemetry receivers - mostly DEI and Microdyne.
These are all solid-state as far as I know (the ones I've opened up). I
have a couple of oddball Microdyne 1100 series plug-ins (most came from Ron
Baublitz at US Surplus). These are VLF and a friend told me he thought they
might be for telephone interception. I think these came from one of the US
security agencies. The others are mostly S-band and were ex-NASA stuff. A
couple of the Microdyne mainframes in odd paint/anodize colors (all black
and one a dark blue). I think I have an old Nems-Clark somewhere - I'll
have to see if it has Nuvistors in it.

The other oddball - I think of them as odd since I was used to the classic
octal and the miniature 7- and 9-pin tubes - were the ones with more pins
and used in TV sets prior to the change to all solid-state. I don't recall
what these were called but they were fairly "squat" shaped and had more
pins than the miniature ones - maybe 11 or 12 pins? I found a photo of a
12-pin one here:

http://oddmix.com/tube7/14br11_ge_zenith.html

Have you ever seen these in anything other than vintage TVs? I don't think
Tek ever used them. Others on this list might know.

Steve H



On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 10:02 AM Jeff Kruth via groups.io <kmec=
aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have read several times in the thread that Nuvistors do not seem to fail
or get weak. This has not been my experience with them.

As one of the largest collectors of WJ & CEI "spook" radios, I have worked
on hundreds of pieces of their gear. The original company, Communications
Electronics Inc, founded by RE Grimm, used Nuvistors extensively in the
products made from the early '60's up into the mid to late 70's. (Along
with Mallory Inductuners!, more TV stuff) They used them in the 900 series,
the 700 series and the famous RS-111 and its military variant, the URR-52,
among others. BTW, NEMS-Clarke & Defense Electronics also used them in
their telemetry radios7 IIRC, the types they used were 8058, 7587 and 6CW4,
for RF amps, IF amps and LO, respectively. Some 7586's as well. The 8058 &
7587 were prone to getting weak and all reception stopped! I have also
found bad 6CW4's but rarely.For a long time 8058 were un-obtanium for me.
Many years after I really needed them I got a stash from cleaning out WJ.
Such is life. YMMV Jeff Kruth ________________ In a message
dated 6/18/2020 12:27:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io writes: I read a history of them several months
ago, but can not recall where
I found it. The internal structure and envelope were manufactured in
the atmosphere. The rim of the ceramic base was metalized so it would
adhere to brazing. The components were then heated to outgas, then
brazed closed, in a very high vacuum chamber. A getter was not used
because the outgassing process cleaned the components very well. My
experience has been that they are very long lived. The circuitry in
consumer equipment may have also been designed so an aging Nuvistor
would still give good performance, I have never seen any change in
results from replacing a well aged one in a TV or FM receiver, even if
they tested marginally. The low voltage version used in a Tek scope,
however does get weak with time and can have catastropic effect on the
operation of the scope.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 6/17/20 10:00 AM, snapdiode via groups.io wrote:
I just think Nuvistors are cool. Any information on how they were made
is interesting to me.
I've heard they were made in a high vacuum chamber with the assembly
machinery in the vacuum chamber.
There is no exhaust port on a Nuvistor.
I also wonder if there is a getter in there, or if the metal case itself
somehow acts as a getter.










Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Roy Thistle
 

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 01:10 PM, Raymond Domp Frank wrote:


I recommend having a serious look at the HP 8568A/B or even an HP 8566A
Why?
If I told you I just took the training wheels off my bike; and, I'm looking to gear up... would you then tell me to get a 350-GT?


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Roy Thistle
 

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 11:29 AM, David Berlind wrote:


I am diversifying from amps into radio (currently studying for my ham license
too) and I'd like to add a spectrum analyzer to my bench.
You didn't tell us what you want it for... or who told you that you need one. If you don't know the answer to either question..do yourself a favour, and drop 100.00USD or less... and get yourself a NanoVNA, or a miniVNA.


Re: Some interesting Nuvistor information

John Atwood
 

Since you mention compactrons, it should be remembered that Tektronix did use them - in the 556 scope: three 6M11 and two 6GF5.

Did any other Tek equipment use compactrons?

- John Atwood


Re: Tektronix 2246 flickering screen, ch2 not working.

wallydoc
 

Good job finding the problem. Sounds like it is somewhere on that page. I would check the transistors with an ohmeter as they are, in place. That may show you something. Another thing to do would be to replace U 801, I did not look it up but it seem to be an op amp. Maybe it is the problem.? Anyway, something to try. Replace C 819, if you have not done that already. That cap and the op amp would make the ramps on the traces for 6D and 6 E.


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Roy Thistle
 

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 11:48 AM, stevenhorii wrote:


A Tek 7L series spectrum analyzer for RF work (7L12 and higher) is going to
be expensive if it is working and even more expensive if working and
calibrated
I had a 7L12... and to me it really wasn't worth it.
With the prices they go for, and for what they are, one begins to wonder if there is some kind of fetish involved in having these.
Anyway David, if you have lots of money, go ahead, knock yourself out... they are darn cute too look at!


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

 

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 10:27 PM, Dave Daniel wrote:


PS - I suggest that any further discussion of HP spec ans be moved to the
HP-Agilent forum.

DaveD


I second that. It's worth it.

Raymond


Re: Some interesting Nuvistor information

teamlarryohio
 

Developed by GE. The most common vertical combo was the 17JZ8 -- series heaters, no power xfmr. GE's TV answer to the all-American 5. No clue why I remember...
-ls-


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Dave Daniel
 

On Jun 18, 2020, at 16:10, Raymond Domp Frank <hewpatek@gmail.com> wrote:

[snip] The HP 8444A (Opt. 059 only!) may be used as a tracking generator for the 8568.
But not for the 8566x spec ans.

PS - I suggest that any further discussion of HP spec ans be moved to the HP-Agilent forum.

DaveD

Raymond



Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

redarlington
 

I <3 My 8566B. It was $3k about 10 years ago on eBay. Worked for a week
and then stopped passing self tests. So I did a live stream for the repair
where I got really drunk and fixed the stepped attenuator. Surgery was a
success and it keeps on giving. Used it yesterday. If you can find one
for one kilobuck, buy it. It goes out to 22GHz or some such. One of my
heaviest and best toys.

-Bob

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 2:02 PM Jim Ford <james.ford@cox.net> wrote:

Dave means HP 8566B. 112 lbs Yes, it is a monster, and yes, it is a gift
from God that we can obtain them for ~$1000 today when they were ~$60k when
new! <snip>


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Paul Amaranth
 

Wouldn't that be the 8566b (22 GHz)? The 8568b goes to 1.5GHz and can
be had somewhat cheaper. I ended up buying my 8568b as parts units for
$300 and made up the bus cable. Specs on those are still good and they
are a joy to use, but shipping is a killer and they have a label on
them to lift each piece separately. The CRTs in the display unit are a
problem when they die but you can get a nice LCD retrofit that adds
color. As long as you're not moving it around that's a nice addition.

Digital functionality just makes these things way nicer to use than the older
analog units.

There are other, more portable, SAs that are in the same price range.
Also, various communications analyzers had SAs along with other useful
instrumentation. They can be had for reasonable prices.

And, of course, a tracking generator makes them even more useful.

Then, as you continue to descend into the blackhole of RF, you can
find a nice VNA. You know you really need one, so might as well
get it over with :-)

Paul

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 03:48:04PM -0400, Dave Daniel wrote:
PS - make sure it has the two interconnect cables.

On Jun 18, 2020, at 15:46, Dave Daniel <kc0wjn@gmail.com> wrote:

While I am an absolute fan of Tektronix instruments, it is my opinion that the best spec ans were built by HP (back in the day, at least). The best HP spec an (IMHO) that a hobbyist can buy is an HP 8556B. It has two units: an RF section and a display section. Both weigh in the neighborhood of 60 - 70 lbs.

For many years, I looked for one that was (a) working and (2) could be had for around $1000. I finally found one after many years of searching. I paid $1100 for it. It worked for the first ten minutes after power-on, then a RIFA cap blew up. After replacing the cap, it has worked well for many years.

If you buy one, the usual caveats about packing and shipping apply.

DaveD

On Jun 18, 2020, at 14:58, amirb <amir.borji@gmail.com> wrote:

forget scope plug-ins, get a decent standalone spectrum analyzer.
A nice "working" 1.8GHz HP 8590L can be had for about $400-700 (I have seen them going even less if you are patient)
there is tons of info on their repair and their calibration is not that hard at all if you really need one






!DSPAM:5eebc500198843753917119!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

 

There is no reason to buy any Tek 7K plugin analyzer except for nostalgic reasons.
I recommend having a serious look at the HP 8568A/B or even an HP 8566A. Resolution, accuracy, user experience are incomparably better than with many other, even later SA's. The 8566A is more expensive than the 8568 because of its larger frequency range but for the sub-2GHz range, the 8568 is perfect. The 8568B is a newer, faster version of the 8568A and has a few more features. It uses an 68000 microprocessor whereas the 8568A uses an HP proprietary CPU.
Most of the 8568's specs are much better (RBW!) than the portable (859X) series and the 856X-series are mostly much more expensive. Weight and size are the only disadvantages. Technical documentation and Youtube videos are all over the Internet. The HP 8444A (Opt. 059 only!) may be used as a tracking generator for the 8568.

Raymond


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Dave Daniel
 

Yep, I fat fingered the model number. Thanks, Jim.

SaveD

On Jun 18, 2020, at 16:02, Jim Ford <james.ford@cox.net> wrote:

Dave means HP 8566B. 112 lbs Yes, it is a monster, and yes, it is a gift from God that we can obtain them for ~$1000 today when they were ~$60k when new! Love mine to death!Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dave Daniel <kc0wjn@gmail.com> Date: 6/18/20 12:46 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Spectrum Analyzer Question While I am an absolute fan of Tektronix instruments, it is my opinion that the best spec ans were built by HP (back in the day, at least). The best HP spec an (IMHO) that a hobbyist can buy is an HP 8556B. It has two units: an RF section and a display section. Both weigh in the neighborhood of 60 - 70 lbs. For many years, I looked for one that was (a) working and (2) could be had for around $1000. I finally found one after many years of searching. I paid $1100 for it. It worked for the first ten minutes after power-on, then a RIFA cap blew up. After replacing the cap, it has worked well for many years.If you buy one, the usual caveats about packing and shipping apply.DaveD> On Jun 18, 2020, at 14:58, amirb <amir.borji@gmail.com> wrote:> > forget scope plug-ins, get a decent standalone spectrum analyzer.> A nice "working" 1.8GHz HP 8590L can be had for about $400-700 (I have seen them going even less if you are patient)> there is tons of info on their repair and their calibration is not that hard at all if you really need one> > >


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Jim Ford
 

Dave means HP 8566B.   112 lbs Yes, it is a monster, and yes, it is a gift from God that we can obtain them for ~$1000 today when they were ~$60k when new!  Love mine to death!Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dave Daniel <kc0wjn@gmail.com> Date: 6/18/20 12:46 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Spectrum Analyzer Question While I am an absolute fan of Tektronix instruments, it is my opinion that the best spec ans were built by HP (back in the day, at least). The best HP spec an (IMHO) that a hobbyist can buy is an HP 8556B. It has two units: an RF section and a display section. Both weigh in the neighborhood of 60 - 70 lbs. For many years, I looked for one that was (a) working and (2) could be had for around $1000. I finally found one after many years of searching. I paid $1100 for it. It worked for the first ten minutes after power-on, then a RIFA cap blew up. After replacing the cap, it has worked well for many years.If you buy one, the usual caveats about packing and shipping apply.DaveD> On Jun 18, 2020, at 14:58, amirb <amir.borji@gmail.com> wrote:> > forget scope plug-ins, get a decent standalone spectrum analyzer.> A nice "working" 1.8GHz HP 8590L can be had for about $400-700 (I have seen them going even less if you are patient)> there is tons of info on their repair and their calibration is not that hard at all if you really need one> > >


Re: Spectrum Analyzer Question

Dave Daniel
 

PS - make sure it has the two interconnect cables.

On Jun 18, 2020, at 15:46, Dave Daniel <kc0wjn@gmail.com> wrote:

While I am an absolute fan of Tektronix instruments, it is my opinion that the best spec ans were built by HP (back in the day, at least). The best HP spec an (IMHO) that a hobbyist can buy is an HP 8556B. It has two units: an RF section and a display section. Both weigh in the neighborhood of 60 - 70 lbs.

For many years, I looked for one that was (a) working and (2) could be had for around $1000. I finally found one after many years of searching. I paid $1100 for it. It worked for the first ten minutes after power-on, then a RIFA cap blew up. After replacing the cap, it has worked well for many years.

If you buy one, the usual caveats about packing and shipping apply.

DaveD

On Jun 18, 2020, at 14:58, amirb <amir.borji@gmail.com> wrote:

forget scope plug-ins, get a decent standalone spectrum analyzer.
A nice "working" 1.8GHz HP 8590L can be had for about $400-700 (I have seen them going even less if you are patient)
there is tons of info on their repair and their calibration is not that hard at all if you really need one


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