Date   

Re: Tek CRTs supplied to competing manufacturers

Greg Muir
 

Thanks, Dennis.

I did think it came from a fairly reputable source. But the years that passed after reading of it made it rather fuzzy in the ol' brain.

As for another title, i would add "...and why was it subject to such suffering under control of a holding company?"

("Big fish eating smaller fish")

Greg


Re: What Tektronix means to me

Brad Thompson
 

Hello--
A chance gift of a 913 (one-inch screen) scope tube helped me get interested in test equipment.
My oscilloscope odyssey really began not with a Tektronix but a Heathkit. At age 15, I had a summer
job with a TV and radio repair shop conducted in a garage by a former meat cutter. As
summer drew to a close, the boss was reluctant to pay me my last week's wages.
My dad visited  the shop, and in lieu of payment I went home with an early-model assembled
Heathkit oscilloscope.

After a few repairskit and a
 I had a working scope, but its performance and stability left a lot to be desired.
A cousin gave me a copy of U.S. Air Force AF manual 52-8, and together with that and an A.R.R.L. Handbook
(1943 edition) I began to understand what was lacking and learned how to fix it...

Dim, fuzzy trace: increase the CRT's high voltage.
Unstable triggering: add a voltage-regulator tube to power the sweep circuit.
Limited sensitivity: use a "hotter" tube in the vertical amplifier.
Limited high-frequency response: experiment with peaking coils in the vertical amplifier.

By then, the scope had outgrown its cabinet due to several added subchassis attached
barnacle-fashion to the original chassis. One thing that I couldn't afford was a flat-faced
CRT to replace the 5BP1.

So I'm off to engineering school and a work-study program at a company that manufactured
magnetic-core buffer memories and black boxes for the space program.  As a junior test tech,
I learned how to use Tek 500-series scopes. A visit to a local surplus dealer yielded a nonworking
Lavoie LA-259(?) scope  as a further step toward owning something almost as good (sic) as a
Tek scope. Unfortunately, the LA-259 came with a power supply problem--
the main power
transformer had an internal short.

A few years later, I bought an RM515-- wonderful, but I needed two channels.
The closest Tek product I could find  to my match my budget was a Telequipment D67
which I still have-- delayed sweep, two channels, sharp-focusing  CRT.

Along the way to the present, I acquired a 453, a 475, a 5440, a 7603,  a 7854
and a 577 curve tracer. There's a 1502 TDR scope and a couple of nonworking
22xx-series scopes awaiting my attention.

After undergoing the obligatory middle-age layoff, I changed careers and
became an editor at a test-equipment magazine.

I owe my career in electronics to that original Heathkit scope and an acquired case of Tek Lust<g>.

73--

Brad  AA1IP


Re: Tek CRTs supplied to competing manufacturers

 

Hi Greg,
I believe you read this is the book "Winning with People; The first 40 years of Tektronix".
Dennis Tillman W7PF

P.S. I'm waiting for the last person working at Tektronix to write the follow-on book to the first book. I propose it have the following title" "What happened to all the People; The last 20 years of Tektronix". :)

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Greg Muir via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2020 10:12 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek CRTs supplied to competing manufacturers

Having my first exposure to Tek oscilloscopes as a wee tyke in the television industry back in the 60’s on a 524AD I became literally hooked on their performance. At that time this scope was being sold as a complete station package by the Radio Corporation of America to supplement their studio equipment and transmission (transmitter) products if a broadcaster should choose to go the “RCA way.” But this also meant that you would buy “urged” into purchasing all RCA replacement parts as time went into the future.

Many years ago I had come across an article that Tek also supplied CRTs to other manufacturers for inclusion into their products. I can’t quite recall what manufacturer the article mentioned but believe that it was either RCA or Dumont who also started producing their own television broadcast related scopes. What the article said was that there was some irritation on Tek’s behalf that they then had gained competition in that product line but also cooperated in selling a component (namely the CRT) for the foreign product.

The article went on to mention that, as part of the “hesitant sales” was to pick out and ship those CRTs to their customer that did not quite meet the Tek standard when tested but were fully functional otherwise.

Has anyone else ever come across this article?

Greg





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: 2465B - Weak Readout Intensity

Alex
 

On Thu, Jan 23, 2020 at 07:58 PM, Lawrance A. Schneider wrote:
Thank you, larry
You are welcomed Larry, hope that EEVBlog thread helps you out, as it has for many people so far.


Re: Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

 

Hi Michael,
No not for a personal 577. They might have been there to prevent the 177 from ever getting loose or as a simple precaution to prevent people from taking the 177.
Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mlynch001
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2020 11:18 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

Dennis,

I suppose mine is missing the screws, since mine just pulls out. Never looked under it for any sort of retainer. Do you feel that these screws are essential? If so, I will install them.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

Mlynch001
 

Dennis,

I suppose mine is missing the screws, since mine just pulls out. Never looked under it for any sort of retainer. Do you feel that these screws are essential? If so, I will install them.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


The importance of CONTEXT, COMMON SENSE, and COURTESY in your replies

 

It is so obvious to me that including CONTEXT is critical in our replies so
we can follow a thread that I assume sooner or later everyone will
understand how important it is. I have resisted writing about this for
almost a year because I was sure everyone must already know how important
this is.

OK, I admit I was being naive.

When replying to a previous post it is extremely important to include the
context, or at least a summarized version, of the post you are responding
to. Often an initial post will develop a life of its own as members reply to
different aspects of it. It becomes particularly important in those cases
that your reply contain some reference to the aspect of the original post
you were referring to. This is necessary so we know which part of a previous
post or a thread that has spawned off a previous post you are responding to.




CASE IN POINT: 8 days ago I started this thread "What Tektronix means to
me". Apparently many people feel the same way I do about Tek. I know this
because there have been at least 85 replies to my post. Some of them have
wandered so far from anything I said in my original post that common sense
says they should have changed the subject. But common sense is apparently,
not common enough. As my friend Alan Cooper, once said: "People don't need
Artificial Intelligence. What they really need is Artificial Common Sense"

This post illustrates what can happen when people forget they are not the
center of the world.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of xxxxxx
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2020 xxxxxx
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hello yyyyy,

case in point: an SDK is available for the thing!

zzzzz



(These are rhetorical questions I am about to ask about this one line
comment that is all there is in this post "case in point: an SDK is
available for the thing!" and the last thing I want is people sending me
their answers). Here are the three questions that came to mind when I read
this post:

1) What does this have to do with my original post?

2) Is this important to me?

3) Most importantly: Does the sender expect me to go searching back through
all 85 posts to find out what he is referring to?



To the sender of this post and everyone else I am asking that in the future
you remember that we have 8,000 members worldwide. Multiply the time it
takes me to answer all three of those questions by several hundred other
members who are asking themselves the same questions and you have wasted a
huge amount of time because you chose to save yourself precious seconds by
typing a cryptic reply like this one without the context that would quickly
answer the 3 questions I asked.



We have 8,000+ members scattered around the world. Their time is valuable.
Many of our 8,000 members do not have time in their very busy lives to
follow an original post as it splits into several sub-threads in real time.
And when they are able to respond days later to a post with many diverging
threads it can be impossible to understand what previous replies refer to
what aspect of the original post.



Please include context in your all of your replies This is simple common
sense, and an essential courtesy in a forum like ours where everything you
have to say may be read and puzzled over by 8,000 other people.



Dennis Tillman W7PF


Tek CRTs supplied to competing manufacturers

Greg Muir
 

Having my first exposure to Tek oscilloscopes as a wee tyke in the television industry back in the 60’s on a 524AD I became literally hooked on their performance. At that time this scope was being sold as a complete station package by the Radio Corporation of America to supplement their studio equipment and transmission (transmitter) products if a broadcaster should choose to go the “RCA way.” But this also meant that you would buy “urged” into purchasing all RCA replacement parts as time went into the future.

Many years ago I had come across an article that Tek also supplied CRTs to other manufacturers for inclusion into their products. I can’t quite recall what manufacturer the article mentioned but believe that it was either RCA or Dumont who also started producing their own television broadcast related scopes. What the article said was that there was some irritation on Tek’s behalf that they then had gained competition in that product line but also cooperated in selling a component (namely the CRT) for the foreign product.

The article went on to mention that, as part of the “hesitant sales” was to pick out and ship those CRTs to their customer that did not quite meet the Tek standard when tested but were fully functional otherwise.

Has anyone else ever come across this article?

Greg


Re: Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

 

Hi Gary,

Oh boy, I once spend hours trying to get the 177 out of my first 577.
Turn the 577 over. There are two screws near the front of the 577 bottom panel that screw in to the 177 to hold it in place. I suspect they are there to prevent the 177 from being easily stolen. The 177 will not budge until you remove them.
Then you can pull it out by the two ground lugs on either side of the front of the 177. At first it may seem stuck but that is because the connector contacts of the 577 holds the PC Board of the 177 pretty tight.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: Gary Robert Bosworth
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2020 9:27 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

Does anyone know how to mount and dismount the 177 test fixture into the 577 curve tracer? Is there a locking mechanism?

Gary




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

Bob Koller <testtech@...>
 

Pulls out, but DO NOT pull on the Vertical Current knob , it has a plastic coupling and you will break it!
There can be two sources of friction preventing easy removal; there are short screws securing the cover underneath the instrument. If too long, they will drive into the plugin. Also, sometime the lower cabinet skirts are adjusted too close.


Re: Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

Mlynch001
 

Gary,

Mine just pulls out by grasping the two little knobs on the front and giving it a tug. Pops right out.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


Mounting and dismounting curve tracer 177 fixture

Gary Robert Bosworth
 

Does anyone know how to mount and dismount the 177 test fixture into the 577 curve tracer? Is there a locking mechanism?

Gary


Re: Tek 151- to- generic database lost ?

 

I am not familiar with Stan's 151 Reprise database. The one I am familiar with is Stan's CRT database which was done by Bill DenViste (I'm not sure of the spelling) and it hasn't been active for a many years now.
If I am not mistaken the museum was hoping to get that CRT data and reproduce it. I Think they were going to combine that data with the CRT part numbers they scanned off the microfiche. I helped by entering some of the data manually a few months ago but since then I haven't heard anything. I will see what I can find out and report back.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim Phillips
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2020 6:01 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek 151- to- generic database lost ?

From Tim P (UK)
Just tried to look up a Tek-to-generic transistor on what was Stan's reprise database and is now on web archive. This program fails to find anything, whatever 151-number is input. Has the database been lost ? I see Vernonia is defunct, but I managed to find what I needed on Sphere's pages.
Tim




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: 7A26 transient response 5 nS all atten

 

Hi Jean-Paul,
You mentioned you had one 7A26 with a flaky BNC. Unfortunately replacing the BNC is very difficult. You have to take apart a lot of the plugin to do it. Very annoying that Tek made the plugin that way.

Otherwise the 7A26 is so perfect that it was the best-selling plugin Tek ever made or anyone else for that matter. Over 130,000 were made. When Tek made the 100,000th one they gold plated the front panel and gave it to the designer, Tom Rousseau.
https://vintagetek.org/100000-7a26-plug-in/
I was there when Tom brought it to the museum so I got to hold it myself. WOW!

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jean-Paul
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 9:13 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 7A26 transient response 5 nS all atten

Hello all:

After the 7A26 transient fix, I realized how useful these 7A26 are, so I searched my storage....2 more + 3 junkers!

2 tested 9 years ago, marked with faults, but after exercising controls,

#1 super, the best transient response.
#2 flaky BNC must fix but useable, has acceptable transient.
Both need attenuator cleaning and calibration.

THe 3 junkers are missing knobs, bad fault. I am in 7A26 nirvana.
Hours of fun to do the rework and calibrations on these marvelous plugins, at least I know the drill.

Bench festooned with 7A26...http://crypto-museum.org/TEK/7A26/7A26.jpg

Enjoy,
Jon








--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


OT: Tektronix Engineers ?? CP/M Big Board J.B. Ferguson; Micro Cornucopia David Thompson (Bend, Oregon)

garp66
 

Other:
Possibly Tek engineer inspired(?) Big Board CP/M Z80a single board computer &/or Micro Cornucopia magazine ?

Would anyone know if J.B. Ferguson or David Thompson were Tektronix engineers ?
-- And what projects they might have been working on, while or if, they were at Tektronix ?

The Big Board was a Z80 SBC running CP/M with an on-board PFM Rom monitor ~ 1980, BB was designed by J.B. Ferguson ;

Micro Cornucopia was the Big Board community 'forum' technical + software magazine ( David Thompson ), the group was so popular that SOG meetings were held annually in Bend, Or.

If Tek related, and, on a slight chance,

-- Would anyone know how to reach either J.B. Ferguson or David Thompson ?

thank you,
rick


Re: What Tektronix means to me

 

Hi KISS,
The follow-up posts to my original "What Tektronix means to me" post have wandered pretty far into the weeds by now but you brought it right back to the beginning for me when you mentioned the 4004. The 1971 ad announcing it confused me so I circled the number on the card requesting more information. These were exciting times when ICs and semiconductors with new capabilities were announced every day. The datasheet arrived and I had a sense this was trouble. This was the longest datasheet I had ever seen. It had a very complicated block drawing on the first page. And inside there was something that made no sense at all. It was a table of "opcodes". This upset me at the time because I didn’t understand it and that usually meant I was in trouble. I remember hoping that this is not something I will ever need to use so I tossed the datasheet in the trash.
Fast forward to 1977. The 4004 didn't go away. Instead they designed the 8008. Then they designed a better one than that, the 8080. By then this little company and their 8080 was hard to ignore. A friend convinced me I could build my own computer with this thing, or the even with the better Z80. This little chip was about to change my life. I was a circuit designer but I knew nothing of computer busses and the very complicated troubleshooting problems they created. It soon became clear that my 453 was no match for microcomputers.
When I bought bought my 453 scope in 1967 for $2000 everyone thought I was crazy. 2 years later it was clear to me that this was the best investment I had ever made in myself. 10 years later the Tek Service Technician I was talking to while he calibrated my 453 convinced me that my next Tek scope should be a lab scope so it will be adaptable to my changing needs. That is what I did. By then there was no doubt in my mind that a Tek scope was an investment in my future. 3 years later I was designing microcomputer peripherals without much success with my dual channel 7704A scope. It wasn’t much better than my old 453 was for troubleshooting busses. Fortunately Tek was way ahead of me. They had a logic analyzer plugin designed for anyone working with complicated logic surrounding the CPU chips and their busses. "All" I needed was $4,000 to buy a 7D01, DF2, and DL2 plugin and I would be able to finally figure out the buss. To my surprise, my girlfriend (now my wife, Marian) was willing to co-sign a bank loan so I could buy these plug-ins.
Eventually I outgrew the 7704A. I have always had a craving for speed so I found a way to trade up to a 7904A for a while. But that still wasn’t fast enough so I even upgraded the 7904A to 1GHz with the 7A21N plugin to see what 350pS risetime pulses looked like. I was more than a little disappointed when I discovered they look like their slower cousins. Why I thought they would be different puzzles me looking back on this.
To this day I have a fondness for all the 8-bit computers that were introduced in the late 1970s. The 7D02 Software Logic Analyzer, the software complement to the 7D01 hardware logic analyzer, is a favorite plugin of mine. It lets me pick apart executing software on all of the 8-bit and 16-bit microcomputers I know so well.
A few years ago I was asked to help someone who bought a used scanning electron microscope (SEM) that, unknown to anyone, had been deliberately sabotaged by a disgruntled technician before he crated it up and shipped it. At one point we had repaired enough of the damaged logic when it became clear the microprocessor which controlled the SEM was waiting for some external event to occur. Hitachi, the manufacturer, refused all requests for a flowchart of the program. Without the 7D01 and newer 7D02 plugins it would probably have been impossible to figure out what the CPU was waiting for. Eventually we identified the event and why the CPU was waiting for it. Along the way we met a very special professor at Portland State University who designs electron microscopes. With his suggestions and guidance the Hitachi S2400 SEM now exceeds the manufacturer's original specifications. By now my friend and I have even repaired the Elektros Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) I got as a member of the vintageTEK Museum. Elektros was the second company spun off from Tektronix (Rodgers Organs was the first).
Tektronix instruments have been a constant companion of mine ever since I first discovered their importance over 50 years ago. They are my eyes into the world of electronics. Without them I would be blind and not much help to anyone. With them I can see into the future.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of KeepIt SimpleStupid via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2020 11:26 AM
To: tekscopes@groups.io; TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Me and two lab partners designed a "computer too back in the 1980's for an EE class. I should still have my write-up. This was 4004/8008 time frame or 1980's.

It was a microprogrammed hardware sorter built out of TTL chips. There were three basic blocks: 1) Memory; 2) Instructions and 3) the program counter I got stuck with the last one and know why the PC points to the next instruction.
The microcode was 16 bits wide and 16 bits long. It did ascending/decending sorting of probably 16 numbers of a single digit depending on the microcode.
I know there were LED displays too.
The branch and branch as the result of a compare instruction was probably the most difficult.
We each worked on our parts separately and independently.
Fun!



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Re: Your generosity is STUNNING!

victor.silva
 

Sorry to say, but I also sent in $10 and was not on this list. As others have said it's not being on the list that matters, it's that you received the funds.

0U638724F1395745J

Thanks for your efforts.
--Victor.Silva


Re: Tel 576 relay

John Griessen
 

On 1/24/20 8:33 AM, peter bunge wrote:
Can't send pictures. Does no one use this:
First-Class Mail® International Large Envelope $3.12

That works, and it takes some packaging time to insert little lumpy things in a slab of PPE
inside an envelope so it is flat.


Re: 465 Capacitor

Eric
 

I have made a small circuit board to hold a replacement cap with moveable pins to align to different mounting holes. This is also good due to the ground carry through that was done on the can. It keeps this in tact.

On 1/23/2020 7:30 PM, Tom Miller wrote:
Use a radial lead 1200 uF/25 volt, 105 °C cap. Be sure to jumper the ground pads if required. Active track is on both sides of the board. Buy the cap from a reliable supplier such as Mouser.

On 1/23/2020 3:27 PM, Rob Naulty wrote:


I recently bought a 465 to fix up and noticed that an aluminum can axial lead capacitor is leaking dried crap from one side. The capacitor is located on the bottom board. C1220 is the location on the schematic printout.
Its listed as 1000uf 20% 10v. Any ideas where to find a replacement?  Thanks, Rob





Re: Tel 576 relay

peter bunge
 

Can't send pictures. Does no one use this:
First-Class Mail® International Large Envelope $3.12

On Fri, Jan 24, 2020 at 9:20 AM peter bunge via Groups.Io <bunge.pjp=
gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

[image: image.png]
This is about the same sending the other way.
Using flat rate boxes is for the wealthy and lazy
I'm sorry I ever raised this issue.

On Thu, Jan 23, 2020 at 8:44 PM David DiGiacomo <daviddigiacomo@gmail.com>
wrote:

On Thu, Jan 23, 2020 at 5:32 PM peter bunge <bunge.pjp@gmail.com> wrote:

My relay has an open coil. It is only a spare which I may never need.
For $40 I will repair it if I ever need it. I was hoping to find
someone
else that needs one and bring the cost down to $10.
Well, $10 is not going to happen. Minimum package postage US to
Canada is about $8.





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