Date   
Re: Looking for cabinet top for 465M

Bert Haskins
 

On 1/16/2020 7:29 PM, KB6NAX wrote:
I'll buy a junked 465M if it will go for cheap just to get a top cover. Just let me know. Thanks. -Ard
Where are you located?

Re: Remote CSA803 / HP1180x programming (yet again)

Leo Bodnar
 

What I really like about RS-232 is that RS stands for "Recommended Standard"!
Leo

On Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 10:59 AM, Roy Morgan wrote:
Among my coworkers were the folks who organized and chaired the international committees that wrote the standards. (One fellow had chaired the committee that developed RS-232.)

Re: 7A26 transient response 5 nS all atten

Colin Herbert
 

Hi,
I, too, have a 7A26 with no letter at the front of the serial-number (102925). The label with this serial-number on it also identifies the plug-in as having been manufactured in Tektronix, Guernsey, which is why there is no "B" or "H" in front of the serial-number.
My manual, though originally produced in Beaverton (as I think all may have been), has a page in the "Change Information" section at the back referring to changes to Guernsey-produced 7A26s from tentative S/N 100396 and 100777.
I don't know how much use this will be to you, but I also have a source of the ICs used in the 7A26 (unless they have all been sold). They don't usually fail, but swapping them between channels (they are plug-in but be careful of bending the legs) is a pretty simple way of verifying them.
There are also a couple of resistors, one in each channel, which are at about their wattage limit, get hot and sometimes change value because of this. They are R1327 and R1329 (8K2, 0.25W. Carbon comp.) and would benefit in being replaced with resistors of higher wattage.
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jean-Paul
Sent: 17 January 2020 12:20
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] 7A26 transient response 5 nS all atten

Hello all: My workhorse 7A26 needed rework, in 7804 mainframe.
Cleaned the AC/DC/GR contacts on attn with the iso alcohol-paper strips, and exercised some scratchy controls.
Poor fast transient response on CH2, same dip and peak ~ 5 nS at ALL V/div.

Setup: Leo Bodnar pulser 40 pS>Mini Ckt HAT-15>>Mini Ckt HAT 20>>precision 50 Ohm thru>>7A26 input
Same result if 7A26 is in L or R side 7804.
Shots are: Affected 7A26, CH2, CH1, Good 7A26 Ch2 Ch1
http://crypto-museum.org/TEK/7A26/7A26.pdf

Since the aberration is constant on every V/DIV, the attenuator and 2X amp seem to be exonerated.

Before I dare probe the CH 2 amp circuit, a few questions please:

1/ Test points mentioned on schematic are NOT in PCB photos, only the parts numbers. Need a board layout with test pts.
2/ Using normal P6137 probe. placement of ground lead ?
3/ Precautions in probing around the custom TEK hybrid ICs, eg U2350, U2450?
4/ Serial: Manual has sch versions for SN B179999 < and B180000>.
My other 7A26s have this format SN, but this has no letter, 708058. I think its a late model, but see no IC date codes.
Readout PCB is 672-0051-13 Amplifier PCB is 670-2549-21 attenuators are PN200-1442-00

Hope to receive some tips from our TEK veterans!

Jon in Paris

Re: Remote CSA803 / HP1180x programming (yet again)

Don Bitters
 

Ah yes, an impressive o-scope, that I too loved to hate.  With the right plugins it would do 20+ GHz.  My experience with them was to calibrate them - manually! for HP/Agilent.  IBM had a ton of them on their optical amp production lines.  Nobody at Tek or HP ever automated the cal procedure.  I have cal'd about 50 of the CS803's and 1180x's with the SD22 and SD24 plugins, the plugins have plugins!!!.  Through a lot of diligence and practice I could get the cal procedure down to 3.5 hrs on the mainframe and 5.5 hrs. on the plugins with full data taken.  I think the data stack for 12 ea. 11803's with plugins with 3 slots occupied with 2ea. SD24's/ plugin was over 10 in. tall. That was over a week of calibration alone at 10+ hr. days, definitely not fun.I have never heard of anyone automating the cal on these, probably too much programming effort.IBM did run them full automation on their production lines for their testing.Don Bitters

7A26 transient response 5 nS all atten

Jean-Paul
 

Hello all: My workhorse 7A26 needed rework, in 7804 mainframe.
Cleaned the AC/DC/GR contacts on attn with the iso alcohol-paper strips, and exercised some scratchy controls.
Poor fast transient response on CH2, same dip and peak ~ 5 nS at ALL V/div.

Setup: Leo Bodnar pulser 40 pS>Mini Ckt HAT-15>>Mini Ckt HAT 20>>precision 50 Ohm thru>>7A26 input
Same result if 7A26 is in L or R side 7804.
Shots are: Affected 7A26, CH2, CH1, Good 7A26 Ch2 Ch1
http://crypto-museum.org/TEK/7A26/7A26.pdf

Since the aberration is constant on every V/DIV, the attenuator and 2X amp seem to be exonerated.

Before I dare probe the CH 2 amp circuit, a few questions please:

1/ Test points mentioned on schematic are NOT in PCB photos, only the parts numbers. Need a board layout with test pts.
2/ Using normal P6137 probe. placement of ground lead ?
3/ Precautions in probing around the custom TEK hybrid ICs, eg U2350, U2450?
4/ Serial: Manual has sch versions for SN B179999 < and B180000>.
My other 7A26s have this format SN, but this has no letter, 708058. I think its a late model, but see no IC date codes.
Readout PCB is 672-0051-13 Amplifier PCB is 670-2549-21 attenuators are PN200-1442-00

Hope to receive some tips from our TEK veterans!

Jon in Paris

Re: Risetime calculator (in tekwiki)

Jean-Paul
 

I have the circular slide rule version, Tektronix Circuit Computer (TEK 003-023) circa 1961, risetime, resonance, impedance, etc.
https://vintagetek.org/tektronix-circuit-computer/

Any others have one?
Looking for another one!

Jon

Re: Risetime calculator (in tekwiki)

GerryR
 

Is there a Tek part number associated with this unit? How is it used to calculate rise time?
Thanks,
GerryR

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim Phillips" <timexucl@...>
To: <TekScopes@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 17, 2020 2:32 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Risetime calculator (in tekwiki)


from Tim P (UK)
What is this, please? It seems to be a simple analog computer, maybe with
Log pots.
In case the link doesn't work, the device is in tekwiki Other Instruments.

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/Risetime_Calculator

Appears to give f = sqrt(a^2 + b^2 + c^2)

thanks
Tim P

Re: Remote CSA803 / HP1180x programming (yet again)

Roy Morgan
 

Leo,

I do remember Hays modem commands, though only dimly.

I wonder if "AT" stands for "Attention, Terminal ! ".

On a related bit of lore: while I worked at NIST, I used a bit of SQL and learned that the letters originally stood for Structured Query Language but that later the official name of the standard was changed to "Database Language SQL", with no meaning for the letters.

Among my coworkers were the folks who organized and chaired the international committees that wrote the standards. (One fellow had chaired the committee that developed RS-232.)

IBM used to mean "International Business Machines" didn't it?

And so we "Graybeards" mumble off into the mists of time. ... ...

Roy Morgan
K1LKY Western Mass

On Jan 17, 2020, at 4:31 AM, Leo Bodnar <leo@...> wrote:
...
If you are old enough - think modems Hayes AT commands.
...

Re: Risetime calculator (in tekwiki)

Leo Bodnar
 

It can be also done with linear pots and quadratic scale markings around the pot.
Or a slide rule with two sliders.
Leo

Remote CSA803 / HP1180x programming (yet again)

Leo Bodnar
 

Has anybody produced anything interesting recently for CSA803 / 1180x series that allows remote comms? Apart from screen shot capture and printing.
The talks about these instruments spring up now and then only to die again.

Here is what I have cooked up quickly to avoid facing its excruciating UI. As you can see - I don't know python (and not willing to learn it.)

http://www.leobodnar.com/pulser/

I have used Prologix for this so "++.." commands are GPIB adapter configuration. If you are old enough - think modems Hayes AT commands.

CSA803 is the instrument I love to hate. There is nothing right with it apart from its raw functionality and market abundance.
I'd like to write more code to get nicer looking charts but I have run out of patience.

Cheers
Leo

Re: Risetime calculator (in tekwiki)

Albert Otten
 

Ideally you would use pots (as variable resistors) for which the resistance increases quadratically from ccw to cw. Then compare the sum of the first 3 resistances with the 4th resistance in a bridge circuit and tune the 4th pot to zero reading. I don't think that the quadratic behavior can be approached good enough with log pots and some trimpots and extra resistors.

Albert

On Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 08:31 AM, Tim Phillips wrote:


from Tim P (UK)
What is this, please? It seems to be a simple analog computer, maybe with
Log pots.
In case the link doesn't work, the device is in tekwiki Other Instruments.

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/Risetime_Calculator

Appears to give f = sqrt(a^2 + b^2 + c^2)

thanks
Tim P

Re: "liquid crystal driver" sighting

p mc
 

Thank you, Mr. Little, for starting to fill in a blank spot on the map.

At TekWiki I cleaned out the obsolete stub text and poor front panel image.

Risetime calculator (in tekwiki)

Tim Phillips
 

from Tim P (UK)
What is this, please? It seems to be a simple analog computer, maybe with
Log pots.
In case the link doesn't work, the device is in tekwiki Other Instruments.

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/Risetime_Calculator

Appears to give f = sqrt(a^2 + b^2 + c^2)

thanks
Tim P

Re: 2445 EPROMs

Chuck Harris
 

Hi Chris,

My humble apologies, the CPU uses a 5MHz square wave clock. The
processor is a 68A02.

Early microprocessors usually took several cycles per instruction.
5, I think was the minimum for the 6800 family... leading to a 200ns
requirement on access time.

It has been a long, long, time since I last had to design with, or
debug a 6800 series microprocessor. I have never found one bad in
all of the 2465's I have calibrated... actually, I have never found
one bad in anything I have worked on.

200ns is what tektronix used as the access time for the RAM, and EPROM.

I would put the probably that the EPROM is good at 99.999%... unless
you have had a power supply problem that has elevated the 5V to above
7V... in which case, most everything on the CPU card will be bad.

Look instead at the jumpers on the board. There are test jumpers that
will prevent boot up.

Also, look at the reset circuitry. A single bad part, and the CPU
will never get out of power on reset. Pay particular attention to the
0.1uf and 2.2M resistors that provide the timing.

Assuming that there is CPU activity, there should be an LED lit on the
front panel indicating the failure cause.

-Chuck Harris

christopherbath@... wrote:

Hi Chuck,

Looking at the schematics the processor seems to be driven by a 5MHz clock (the clock being generated by a 10MHz crystal). According to the datasheet for the 6802 the maximum clock frequency is 4MHz so I am not sure what is going on here? Possibly the processor is a MC68A02 or MC68B02. I guess you would need to look into the bus timing is more detail to work out the access time requirements for the ROM but agree that 250ns or less would be more than enough.

The 2445 won’t power up properly. It seems to me as if the processor hangs on start-up. Given that the scope seems to do slightly different things on start-up I am suspicious about the EPROMs that would have been programmed about 30 years or more ago. The power supply rails all seem to be ok so I think the EPROMs are the next place to be looking. Perhaps I should also check the clock and reset for the microprocessor.

Regards,

Chris



7000 series Z-axis characteristics

Ed Breya
 

Does anyone know offhand, if all the 7K mainframes have the same - more or less - characteristics for the Z-axis input, such as polarity, levels, and input R?

Ed

Re: What Tektronix means to me

 

Hi Tam,
This (below) is what I said in the last sentence of my last message. The URL was in it so anyone who was interested could take a look at them.
"Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613
"
Please remember this was 1993 and I was exploring all the simple BASIC programs Tek provided in their 7854 Application notes. They showed how to connect to the 7854 via GPIB. It was my first time using GPIB so I had to learn how that worked and I had to overcome glitches with how the GPIB card worked.
Once I was able to communicate with the scope the program got very big very quickly as I added one capability after another. For example:
1) Reading and writing text to/from the screen,
2) Downloading waveforms and saving them to disk,
3) Uploading waveforms to the CRT or to different waveform storage locations,
4) Downloading programs that I created using the external keyboard and saving them to disk,
5) Uploading programs to the 7854 from disk,
6) Writing programs in Edit (I don't think Notebook was around then) on my PC and uploading them to the 7854.
There were many more things I don't recall that I did. It was really fun. Of course after you are finally able to make something work you understand how you should have done it in the first place.

"The knowledge you need to succeed is elusive until you succeed and then hindsight tells you how you should have done it from the start."

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tam Hanna
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 7:32 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hello Dennis,
sorry to bug you.
May I have these pictures for my Instagram? I would, of course, mention you as my source!
All the best from Budapest
Tam, still somewhat ill--
With best regards
Tam HANNA
Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Re: What Tektronix means to me

Tam Hanna
 

Hello Dennis,

sorry to bug you.


May I have these pictures for my Instagram? I would, of course, mention you as my source!


All the best from Budapest

Tam, still somewhat ill

--
With best regards
Tam HANNA

Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/

Looking for cabinet top for 465M

KB6NAX
 

I'll buy a junked 465M if it will go for cheap just to get a top cover. Just let me know. Thanks. -Arden

Re: Trying to bring back a AA501

Eric
 

The real issue is my confidence level going "off script" I am not well versed in subbing a part for a non exact match part. but gaining experience every day. I have some IC's ordered so we will see what happens. The good news is this is a common as dirt NAND gate.

On 1/16/2020 8:55 AM, Rick Bale wrote:
Eric, what is the basic criteria needed to be sure the swapped device will work? From all the steps you’ve taken with this resurrection so far, I think you know how to assess the swap.

Re: What Tektronix means to me

petertech99h
 

Well said Dennis!  I can see many of us feel that same way. I'll be quick:
The first time I saw a Tek scope was in high school back in '73, only the teacher was allowed to use it, students used mid 60'sHeathkit scopes at the lab benches. The teacher even had the 'Tekscope' publications and from HP too, only the best studentsgot to read them (no bubble gum chewing pls!).
My journey into electronics began in earnest when I got a set of Texas Instruments hardcover databooks in 1974, back then they were
'trade only' not available to hobbyists. A neighbor was a TI employee.
In 1978 I was working in a lab at a university as a junior tech, designing PCBs, assembly, wiring, fabrication later some circuit design too. What struck me was how well the labs were equipped! 7000s were everywhere along with the best of HP and all other makes you could imagine. Then there were the work shops, machinists, cryolabs, on and on. The machinists were old school, back then a few were WW2 guys who claimed to work on the early jets as well.  A few of these old guys still used tools from back in the day - with nazi markings on them, I guess they were not kidding! One machinist 'the master' had a complete machine shop just for himself!  Turns out he worked on the weirdest and hardest stuff.
Why all these guys and gear with no students in our building? Even back then we needed key access, students were the riff raff we pushed out of the way when traveling to different parts of the campus! In 1982 after a new clearance, I was moved to the real programs that kept everybody busy - NASA payloads and FermiLab!
It all made sense! The best of Tek was key - I was glad to be there, what luck!

'73s to all!

Pete

On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 8:01:47 p.m. EST, Abc Xyz <yawrdanza@...> wrote:

Damn! You are one Gifted Dude!!!  :)

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 3:36 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

The 7854 is both analog (400MHz) and digital. It combines the best of both
worlds.
As the very first digital lab scope they did many things that were ground
breaking. Start with the fact that the 7000 series was designed before the
concept of digital scopes could even have be conceived of. It would have
been understandable if the already released 7000 plugins were not
compatible with it but they all work just fine. The 7854 design team chose
to use 10-bit samples when everyone else settled on 8-bits because it was
more efficient and less complicated. 10-bit samples make for a much
SMOOTHER display of stored traces. It has an astounding vector processing
software language built into it that terrified hardware EEs. Tek quickly
removed any reference to it from their marketing materials when they got
negative feedback about this from potential customers. In 1980 nearly 100%
of all hardware engineers viewed programming as black magic. This built in
language for processing waveforms was revolutionary. It is unfortunate that
this was developed decades before engineers were willing and able to use
anything like it. It was the first scope with a GPIB interface so you could
talk to it. I wrote an extensive program in 1993 in MSDOS Quick Basic that
allowed me to do anything I wanted with my 7854. It took advantage of the
GPIB interface to read and store waveforms on disk or to write waveforms
back to the 7854 for later display. I wrote programs using the external
keyboard and ran the programs on the 7854 or saved them for later use on
disk. I could write 20 lines of text on the 7854 CRT. My software
automatically calculated and displayed dozens of parameters about any
waveform I captured and displayed them on my PC monitor alongside the
waveform. As do most BASIC programs it eventually grew so complicated it
collapsed under its own weight when I could no longer keep track of the
interactions between different sections of it.

Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six
waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on
TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Abc
Xyz
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:29 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Dennis,

  I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854
is your Favorite. Why is that?

  JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it
sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at
Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have
been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when
Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that
would soon be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends.
Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me
several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at
the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He
is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek
employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone
at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many
fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become
a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek
closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those
lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at
a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next
room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days
later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled
why I would want his autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all
the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks.
Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the
Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the
mid-1980s that attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees
that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with
the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a
good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jim Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis!  Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20  10:36 PM  (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far
away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is
not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never
know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I
decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to
San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch,
Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater
in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new
Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an
offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in
college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured
me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next
20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a
stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this
time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to
build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again
and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few
people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers.
Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software.
That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer
programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer
background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I
found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was.
They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the
mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe
job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time
sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers
to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual
Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications
that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a
job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well),
the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later
that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it
would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory)
where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3
years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They
had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science
or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in
Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went
from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too
many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were
other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the
other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear
that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles
from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far.
On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from
New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the
St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope),
and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and
Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to
Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect
to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it
to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride
away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis
Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect
to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm
annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.)  Still
would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A
attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM,
Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a
problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She
has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator.
Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned
with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the
afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my
coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you
when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can
explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I
am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their
products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I
ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10
years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106
probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me
just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for
another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer
assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was
designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in
microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software
marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in
the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a
way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back
in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2
years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay.
10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK
Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.
The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us.
Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has
become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to
the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into
the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He
has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and
comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips.
TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy
using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to
it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK
museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is
within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





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Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator







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Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator