Date   
Re: "parting" 2215A

Bob Albert
 

I submit that your unit is not beyond repair.  Most of the problems are in the preregulator, which is easy enough to fix or replace.
Where are you?  If not too far from Los Angeles I'd be willing to help.
Bob

On Sunday, November 10, 2019, 08:34:47 AM PST, vaclav_sal via Groups.Io <vaclav_sal=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have a hopeless , dead, case 2215A .
It turns on , but  that is all she wrote.
Nothing else is alive.

It has bean left in wet garage for long time and some components are clearly rusted out.
I just hate to ditch it as is, so I am asking the group which components ( CRT - it did lash once , knobs etc,) are worth saving as future trade items.
Vaclav AA7EJ

Tek 576 Curve Tracer, 3 mechanical parts wanted; Does anyone have a parts unit ?

garp66
 

hi,
Does anyone have a Tek 576 parts unit ?

I am looking for some small mechanical Tektronix parts for my Tek 576:

I have photos of the parts that I can email to you off list.
thank you,
rick

a. ) Multiplier plastic cup, holding the multiplier pot in place:
201-0013-00 "CP, CMPNT MTG: PLASTIC"

This is a small plastic gray(?) cup that helps hold the Multiplier Pot in place on the Tek 576 front panel. It may have a metal retaining clip as well.


b. ) The knobs(coaxial) and extension shaft(coaxial) for the Max Peak Volts / Series resistor assembly. Part #'s and description can be seen in the expanded mechanical drawing that I can email.

My knobs & extension shaft (~ 2" long, extending behind the from panel ) are missing:

c. ) Mechanical linkage:
The outer sleeve parts ( # 13, 11, & 8 ) are White Plastic (as see in the photos) but wonder if the inner rod parts ( # 12, 10, 9 etc) are aluminum or plastic ?

The #1 being the actual rotarty switch.

I need the mechanical Extension Link parts, includes Relevant items include Items 6 ~ 13.

I also need the front panel (coaxial ?) Knobs: Numbers 85 through 88 are the relevant items.

**
Tek 576 mechanical white plastic linkage A
White plastic (& metal) shaft extension parts(long & short white bits) for the rotary switch, shown at the right hand side.

Tek 576 plastic link
Top view of the white plastic (& metal) extension shaft that is missing in my Tek 576.

Re: 2445 CH 3 and CH 4 vertical setting - volts/ div where ?

vaclav_sal
 

Note to myself

do not feed Gremlins after midnight and do not post anything late at nigh also
Just ACQUIRED (was adjured ) 2445 scope and trying to get familiar with the controls.

Vaclav

"parting" 2215A

vaclav_sal
 

I have a hopeless , dead, case 2215A .
It turns on , but that is all she wrote.
Nothing else is alive.

It has bean left in wet garage for long time and some components are clearly rusted out.
I just hate to ditch it as is, so I am asking the group which components ( CRT - it did lash once , knobs etc,) are worth saving as future trade items.
Vaclav AA7EJ

Re: 2754p memory problems

John Miles
 

I have two 2754 spectrum analyzers, one partially working, the other basically
a parts mule. When starting the good one, it tells me it has memory faults and
when stepping past it shows memory bad or missing. I have researched and am
concerned I might do serious damage by swapping the memory board from the
parts unit.
Are there any specific sources you've seen that indicate that damage might occur in this particular case? I wouldn't have a problem swapping the boards myself but maybe you've run into a reference I haven't seen. One question is, what are the Tektronix part #s on the two memory boards? It'll certainly be safe to swap the boards if the first two groups of numbers are the same. The -xx suffix may differ but that's not generally a concern.

-- john, KE5FX

Re: 2445 CH 3 and CH 4 vertical setting - volts/ div where ?

vaclav_sal
 

Thanks,I sort-of figured that out by myself late at night.I was using calibrator as a source and that of course is of fixed level.Basically these channels could be used to read 5V logic signals.
But the selection buttons seems to work on botch channels , not on individual channel.That is OK.

Right now I have some kind of vertical magnifier selected since the display on the CRT actually read 1 or 5  volts.I need to find free PDF manual.
Thanks

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, 9:51:53 PM CST, TomC <tomc@...> wrote:

The channel 3 and 4 volts/div for the 2445 can be anything you want as long as
you want 0.5 volts/div or 0.1 volts/div. It is selected by a pair of push
buttons, one for each channel, between the channel 3 and 4 vertical position
controls.

Tom

On 11/9/2019 6:36 PM, vaclav_sal via Groups.Io wrote:
Just adjured 2445 scope and trying to get familiar with the controls.
Not having much luck asking Mrs Google or reading text only  ( no links / reference  ) manuals.
So - any owner of 2445 can tell me  where / how to  select vertical "Volts/Div" setting for CH 3 and CH 4?
I can read the calibrator on CH3 OK , just cannot figure out how to set the vertical setting for it.
Thanks



Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

EricJ
 

Good grade of aluminum. It has been mentioned that brass would probably work too.

--Eric

On Nov 10, 2019 4:47 AM, Tom Gardner <tggzzz@...> wrote:




Sorry, I know electronics, not materials.

Is that plastic or metal?


On 10/11/19 10:14, EricJ via Groups.Io wrote:
6061 most likely.

--Eric

On Nov 10, 2019 3:01 AM, Tom Gardner <tggzzz@...> wrote:



On 10/11/19 05:41, EricJ via Groups.Io wrote:
I am still getting my new machines set up, but I can probably run off
a
few soon.

What material will that be?






Re: 2440 nvram (was: NVRAM back-up battery change on a 2715..... avoiding disasters)

Szabolcs Szigeti
 

Hi,

Yes, i think we are on the same page now. I cas share some of my
experiences.
The attenuator gain and the trigger adjustments only require a couple of DC
voltages. Given that the scope itself has something like 2% accuracy
specification, they do not have to be super accurate. Before I acquired a
scope calibrator, I simply used a precision power supply and measured the
voltage with a multimeter. The interesting part in this calibration is that
this is what provides traceability, as besides calibrating the
attennuators, the scope's internal 10V reference is compared to the
voltage, thus it provides a link to traceable voltage source. If there is
some (I think more than 2%) difference between the voltage provided during
the calibration and the scope internal reference, it will fail. For the
same reason the scope will indicate if any calibration was attempted, thus
traceability was broken.

The channel delay adjustment is about making sure that both channels have
the same delay. The scope is not very interested in having a very fast rise
signal, you can actually see that it simply tries to move the two channel's
waveform so that they are perfectly aligned with each other. I have
successfully performed this calibration with simple pulse generator of 5-6
ns riseftime. What actually is important here is to making sure that the
scope gets the same signal, so equal length cables should be used on both
channels.

The repet calibration is completely automatic no signal input is required
and it will succeed, unless there is some serous misalignment of the CCD
clock.

The CTE calibration is the most difficult, as the service manual refers to
PG506 settings to provide input. But it describes that it needs 100kHz and
6 div p-p. The scope sets itself up for this calibration step, which you
should not change, so if you don't have a PG506 you have to figure out the
input signal. I used a pulse generator to supply a 100kHz 200mV p-p signal
with some offset to provide the necessary signal. ( I hope I remember these
numbers correctly) You can see it on the screen so it is easy to find the
proper setting and the scope will complain if the signal is not good. My
experience is that it needs a clean rising edge, without much overshoot or
ringing. But this step can also be done without a PG506.

So the upshot of all this is that if you have at least a DC power supply
and a half-decent pulse or function generator it is possible to do the
ext-cal on this scope. A PG506 is useful, but it mostly makes the
calibration quicker, by requiring less fiddling with setting up the
calibration steps. Otherwise,it can perfectly be done without it. And you
certainly don't need any additional less common equipment, like TD ulser,
or time-mark generator.

Szabolcs


Raymond Domp Frank <@Raymond> ezt írta (időpont: 2019. nov. 10.,
V, 1:03):

On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 11:16 PM, Szabolcs Szigeti wrote:

Hi Szabolcs,
You wrote:

The service
manual says that self cal + ext cal will bring the scope back to in spec.
It turns out that's correct.
Note: Ext Cal stores "Internal Calibration Constants" in (some sort of?)
NVRAM, which is exactly what I am talking about.
Ext Cal is no big issue but you need some (calibrated) equipment to do it.

Examples:

General:
Chapter 5 paragraphs 4.e and 4.f (page 5-19 in my SM) "Match Ch1 and Ch2
bw at remaining V/div settings". Sine Generator and 5x and 10x attenuators
needed.

Ext Cal (starting at page 5-23):
- "1. Attenuator Gain Adjustments". Needs calibrated voltage generator and
stores constants.
- "2. Channel Delay Adjustments". Needs fast rise calibration generator,
stores constants. I'd be surprised if a slow edge would be ok
- "3. Trigger Adjustments". Calibration generator needed. Stores constants.
- "4. Ramp (REPET) Calibration. Stores constants.
- "5. CTE Calibration. Needs Fast Rise Calibration Generator. Stores
constants.

From the above, I'd say that (Ext) Cal is not only a matter of pressing
some sort of "Self Cal" button(s). It involves connecting and using
calibration equipment and pressing buttons. As said, no big deal (a PG506,
possibly with TD pulser, will do as a generator and voltage source) but a
large part of calibration *is* lost if NVRAM is exchanged. Whether that's
serious is a matter of interpretation but I'd be surprised if an average
2440 will be "in spec" without re-establishing the NVRAM constants. Maybe
deviation is 5% max, as I've seen with analog 24xx'es, don't know.

Raymond



Re: anyone have 310 or 360 parts machine?

 

Hi Phil,
I MAY have one. I am on the road until Friday so you will have to wait until then.

Next Saturday send me an email off list to dennis at ridesoft dot com to remind me and I will take a look.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Phil Cirocco
Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2019 9:40 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] anyone have 310 or 360 parts machine?

I am looking for a graticule lens for my Tektronix 360 indicator module. This is the old scope module for the 160 series with the round CRT.The 310 scope used the same part. Tektronix part #331-0027-00. I will gladly pay for it and shipping. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

Phil Cirocco





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Re: 7S14 7S11 SAMPLER bias QUESTION

 

Hi Miguel,
Absolutely not!
Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: Miguel Work
Sent: Friday, November 08, 2019 6:56 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] 7S14 7S11 SAMPLER bias QUESTION

<snip>
I possible to feed bias in 7S14 with +-50v and resistors, just like the 7S11?

Thanks
Regards




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

TEK 2430A Changing settings

bobmiscmail@...
 

I have a 2430A that I just replaced the NVRAM modules on and all is well relative to that, but I'm wondering if anyone has any thoughts on another problem that it has had for several years. The settings keep changing on the scope, the longer it has gone without use, the worse it is. If it has been on for hours, the problem becomes very infrequent and is tolerable. I worked on it months ago to no avail. I checked all the power supplies and re-seated all the connectors and also the eproms. I monitored the voltage on the bezel switches for a while and did not see any unexpected voltages. I am open to any ideas on where to look. I don't have another digital scope to catch occasional events, only a voltmeter and 2465 scope.

Thanks,
Bob WB6OFS

Tek 310 Restoration Candidate ($40)

Oz-in-DFW
 

I bought this as a sacrificial candidate for a project. While it's rough, it looks like it's in good enough shape that it would be a shame to sacrifice. It is probably better as a restoration candidate.

I've not applied power because I don't know how long it's been without and I don't want to spend time healing the caps.

The manual has been wet, but looks pretty much intact. I have not done a detailed flip through.

Pics here: https://ozindfw.net/Tek310/

$40 (+ actual shipping if not picked up in the DFW area. )

Oz (in DFW) ARS:N1OZ
POB 93167
Southlake, TX 76092

3D printed metal

John Griessen
 

On 11/10/19 8:22 AM, Chuck Harris wrote:
My fervent wish is to be able to 3D print brass, aluminum,
or steel... But alas, that won't be for a while.

What I see that says it is 3D printed brass, or aluminum, is in
actuality a slurry of brass flakes, or aluminum flakes, and some
organic (plastic) meltable binder.
( imaterialize.com ) Whoops, I spelled wrong:

https://i.materialise.com/en/3d-printing-materials/steel


offers a "steel" 3D printed material that has shrinkage
inaccuracies since it is made from steel particles held in a binder,
then oven baked with flux and brazing brass that infuses to create
sintered metal parts.

The shrinkage happens in the oven bake step.

For some things, it could be as good as investment castings, but with more shape freedom.
No requirement not to have undercuts, no limit on how big an area of thin walled shape, no core pins.
Compared to sand castings it's even better -- no parting lines, no draft angles.
--
John

3D printed metal

John Griessen
 

On 11/10/19 8:22 AM, Chuck Harris wrote:
My fervent wish is to be able to 3D print brass, aluminum,
or steel... But alas, that won't be for a while.

What I see that says it is 3D printed brass, or aluminum, is in
actuality a slurry of brass flakes, or aluminum flakes, and some
organic (plastic) meltable binder.
imaterialize.com offers a "steel" 3D printed material that has shrinkage
inaccuracies since it is made from steel particles held in a binder,
then oven baked with flux and brazing brass that infuses to create
sintered metal parts.

The shrinkage happens in the oven bake step.

For some things, it could be as good as investment castings, but with more shape freedom.
No requirement not to have undercuts, no limit on how big an area of thin walled shape, no core pins.
Compared to sand castings it's even better -- no parting lines, no draft angles.
--
John

Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

Tom Gardner
 

Yes and no!

Yes: you can get solid brass 3D printed items; I have one such sign outside my front door. 3D printed gold, silver and platinum is also commercially important - in the jewellery trade.

No: the printed medium is wax, and the brass item is manufactured by the age-old lost wax casting technique.

I'm sure there are many suppliers available, but one is https://www.shapeways.com/materials/brass
Ditto https://www.shapeways.com/materials which shows bronze, gold, silver, platinum.

Their aluminium is made with selective laser sintering, and I've seen titanium used that way.

You can also get 3D printed paper. When combined with an inkjet printer, it enables architects' models to be produced for display in showrooms etc.

And there are other materials, e.g. ceramic.

Additive manufacturing is undergoing a "pre-cambian explosion", much a microprocessors did between 1975 and 1990.

On 10/11/19 14:22, Chuck Harris wrote:
Hi Tom,

Ahh! My fervent wish is to be able to 3D print brass, aluminum,
or steel... But alas, that won't be for a while.

What I see that says it is 3D printed brass, or aluminum, is in
actuality a slurry of brass flakes, or aluminum flakes, and some
organic (plastic) meltable binder. The brass or aluminum comes
to the surface in a way that makes it appear to be brass or aluminum,
but the strength is all plastic.

I read an article of a M1911A2 being entirely printed in steel, but
I never heard how they did that, only that they would happily sell
you one of their printed guns for $30K.... To help fund research,
of course.

I suppose something like a mig welder controlled by a 3D mechanism
would do something... but it would be brutally inefficient.

-Chuck Harris

Tom Gardner wrote:
I've no doubt you are correct.

When I stated "parts could be manufactured in brass or aluminium", I was thinking of
3D printing them. It would have helped if I had been more precise.

Sorry for the confusion.



On 10/11/19 13:20, Chuck Harris wrote:
I had several collets made from the Tom Jobe, etal prints that
are in the file section of this group, and they were made from
a single piece of brass rod... threaded section and all. They
worked perfectly.

Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

Tony Fleming
 

Thanks for that information.

On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 11:15 PM Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

As I said, there are dimensioned prints... prints are
a 2D thing. You will have to use your own cad expertise
to convert them into a 3D mesh for printing.

I am not sure that an all plastic printed solution will
work... tektronix didn't think so, and made a much more
expensive metal/plastic hybrid.

-Chuck Harris

Tony Fleming wrote:
Where are the 3D files to print my own replacement?
Thank you very much.
Tony


On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 6:39 PM Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

More usually, the problem is someone turning the
slotted screw, thinking it loosens the collet.

Turning the screw will break the collet every time.
Tightening the nut is less likely to do that, as that
is the intended way to apply force to the collet.

It is the torque that causes problems.

There are dimensioned prints for the collet in the files
section of this group. A search on collet should find them.

If you can't find them, contact me, and I will send them
to you.

-Chuck Harris

DaveH52 wrote:
Are there any of the fan to motor collet thingies available anywhere?
When I removed the back panel, the fan fell out. I think someone
tightened it up too much and broke it on the scope I'm rejuvinating.









Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

Chuck Harris
 

Hi Tom,

Ahh! My fervent wish is to be able to 3D print brass, aluminum,
or steel... But alas, that won't be for a while.

What I see that says it is 3D printed brass, or aluminum, is in
actuality a slurry of brass flakes, or aluminum flakes, and some
organic (plastic) meltable binder. The brass or aluminum comes
to the surface in a way that makes it appear to be brass or aluminum,
but the strength is all plastic.

I read an article of a M1911A2 being entirely printed in steel, but
I never heard how they did that, only that they would happily sell
you one of their printed guns for $30K.... To help fund research,
of course.

I suppose something like a mig welder controlled by a 3D mechanism
would do something... but it would be brutally inefficient.

-Chuck Harris

Tom Gardner wrote:

I've no doubt you are correct.

When I stated "parts could be manufactured in brass or aluminium", I was thinking of
3D printing them. It would have helped if I had been more precise.

Sorry for the confusion.



On 10/11/19 13:20, Chuck Harris wrote:
I had several collets made from the Tom Jobe, etal prints that
are in the file section of this group, and they were made from
a single piece of brass rod... threaded section and all. They
worked perfectly.

Re: 7854 Error Codes

Fred S.
 

Hi Clark,

thank you so much for your help! I must have been blind, lol

--
Best regards,

Fred S.

Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

Tom Gardner
 

I've no doubt you are correct.

When I stated "parts could be manufactured in brass or aluminium", I was thinking of 3D printing them. It would have helped if I had been more precise.

Sorry for the confusion.

On 10/11/19 13:20, Chuck Harris wrote:
I had several collets made from the Tom Jobe, etal prints that
are in the file section of this group, and they were made from
a single piece of brass rod... threaded section and all. They
worked perfectly.

The group that developed that print, machined several out of
aluminum and they worked fine too.

They used an ordinary thread cutting die to cut the threads on
the threaded section. I suspect that they flipped the die for
the last pass to make the threads cut up to the edge... but there
is no need for them to be cut all that close to the collet body.

-Chuck Harris

Tom Gardner wrote:
I made my own model from the dimensioned prints, and had some made from SLA. I used a
file to make it fit, and have experimented to see how the SLA took the forcibly
inserted screw thread. The results were sufficiently encouraging that I've sent a
modified variant off for manufacture.

A standard home PLA printer definitely won't work. I tried it to assess the relative
quality of a nearby 3D printer, and the results were what I expected: dimensionally
inadequate, and it easily fractures along the joints between layers.

I don't know about the SLA's long-term stability. I do have SLA with a 2mm pitch
thread from 3 years ago that is fine

I don't know about the SLA's long-term stability under heat. I hope it won't get too
hot.

The parts could be manufactured in brass or aluminium, but I don't know whether the
screw thread would be of adequate quality. If not then manual tapping would be
required. They would be more than an order of magnitude more expensive, but still
tolerable. Hence I prefer experimenting with SLA.



On 10/11/19 00:41, Tony Fleming wrote:
Where are the 3D files to print my own replacement?
Thank you very much.
Tony


On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 6:39 PM Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

More usually, the problem is someone turning the
slotted screw, thinking it loosens the collet.

Turning the screw will break the collet every time.
Tightening the nut is less likely to do that, as that
is the intended way to apply force to the collet.

It is the torque that causes problems.

There are dimensioned prints for the collet in the files
section of this group. A search on collet should find them.

If you can't find them, contact me, and I will send them
to you.

-Chuck Harris

DaveH52 wrote:
Are there any of the fan to motor collet thingies available anywhere?
When I removed the back panel, the fan fell out. I think someone
tightened it up too much and broke it on the scope I'm rejuvinating.

Re: 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

Chuck Harris
 

I had several collets made from the Tom Jobe, etal prints that
are in the file section of this group, and they were made from
a single piece of brass rod... threaded section and all. They
worked perfectly.

The group that developed that print, machined several out of
aluminum and they worked fine too.

They used an ordinary thread cutting die to cut the threads on
the threaded section. I suspect that they flipped the die for
the last pass to make the threads cut up to the edge... but there
is no need for them to be cut all that close to the collet body.

-Chuck Harris

Tom Gardner wrote:

I made my own model from the dimensioned prints, and had some made from SLA. I used a
file to make it fit, and have experimented to see how the SLA took the forcibly
inserted screw thread. The results were sufficiently encouraging that I've sent a
modified variant off for manufacture.

A standard home PLA printer definitely won't work. I tried it to assess the relative
quality of a nearby 3D printer, and the results were what I expected: dimensionally
inadequate, and it easily fractures along the joints between layers.

I don't know about the SLA's long-term stability. I do have SLA with a 2mm pitch
thread from 3 years ago that is fine

I don't know about the SLA's long-term stability under heat. I hope it won't get too
hot.

The parts could be manufactured in brass or aluminium, but I don't know whether the
screw thread would be of adequate quality. If not then manual tapping would be
required. They would be more than an order of magnitude more expensive, but still
tolerable. Hence I prefer experimenting with SLA.



On 10/11/19 00:41, Tony Fleming wrote:
Where are the 3D files to print my own replacement?
Thank you very much.
Tony


On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 6:39 PM Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

More usually, the problem is someone turning the
slotted screw, thinking it loosens the collet.

Turning the screw will break the collet every time.
Tightening the nut is less likely to do that, as that
is the intended way to apply force to the collet.

It is the torque that causes problems.

There are dimensioned prints for the collet in the files
section of this group. A search on collet should find them.

If you can't find them, contact me, and I will send them
to you.

-Chuck Harris

DaveH52 wrote:
Are there any of the fan to motor collet thingies available anywhere?
When I removed the back panel, the fan fell out. I think someone
tightened it up too much and broke it on the scope I'm rejuvinating.