Date   

Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

 

How about plastic ice cube trays ?
HankC, Boston, Wa1HOS


Re: What is this soft metal, and is it toxic?

Roy Thistle
 

Hi John:
Did you find out what it was?


FS: miscellaneous Tektronix manuals

Brad Thompson
 

Hello--

I'm offering FS the following original Tektronix manuals-- all are in very good condition
except as noted. Please note that some of these manuals are available for downloading at no cost. However, some users prefer printed copies. Postage is extra (except as indicated).

Scope-mobile 200-1 062-0870-00, May 1969 (R), 8 pp. double-sided. $3.00 postpaid via USPS first-class mail.
******
4957 Series Graphics Tablet Instruction Manual, 070-4784-01, Product
Group 15, Nov.1986 (revised); approx. 72 pp., in 9-inch by 7-inch three-ring
binder. $7.50 plus postage.
******
TDS 200-series Programmer Manual, 071-0493-01, approx. 220 pp., wire-bound,
in as-new condition. Asking $10.00 plus postage

Note1 : "This document supports TDS 210 and TDS 220 with FV:v1.09 and above when used with TDS2CM version CMV:v1.04 and above, or TDS2MM any version, and TDS224 when used with any version of TDS2CM or TDS2MM."

Note 2: Requires an optional RS-232 or GPIB interface (TDS2CM Communications
Extension Module or TDS2MM Measurement Extension Module).
******
11401 and 11402 Programmers Quick Reference, 070-6255-00, Product Group 47,
1988 first printing. approx. 80 pp., wire comb-bound (9-inch by 4-inch format), In very-good-minus condition (front cover creased). Asking $7.50 plus postage.
******
DSA 601A and DSA 602A Digitizing Signal Analyzers Quick Reference, 070-8183-00,
Product Group 47, 1991 first printing. approx. 60 pp., wire comb-bound (9-inch by 4-inch format), In good-plus condition (front cover creased, wire comb slightly distorted).
Asking $7.50 plus postage.
******
P6231 10X Active Probe, DC to 1.5 GHz, Instruction Manual, 070-6027-00 Product
Group 60, revised 1987, (8 1/2 inch by 5 1/2 inch plastic comb binding) approx 40 pp.
In very good condition (front cover slightly faded) Asking $7.50 plus postage.
**********************************

Question welcomed, PayPal honored.

thanks, and 73--

Brad AA1IP


Re: Large lot of Tek equipment for sale

ray_g4lua
 

Q: How many 'scopes does one person need? A: "Just ONE more"!

de G4LUA


Re: What is this soft metal, and is it toxic?

John
 

I have a 250g ingot of pure Indium. It was purchased during the developement phase of a 500W Band II amplifier module, to see if it could be formed into thermally-conductive washers (RF transistor flange to heatsink interface). The answer was no: despite being very soft, it was not soft enought to flow at the pressures involved in bolting down the transistors. Gram for gram it's close to silver in cost. Perhaps I should make up some solder for use on gold connections?

John


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Harvey White
 

On Tue, 04 Dec 2018 04:36:40 -0800, you wrote:

If you want, you can color code the envelopes with colored dots from a
stationary store, or colored labels.

And for the OT?

If someone talks about spectrum analyzers, I'm not the right person.

Logic analyzers, yes.

OT? likely anything.

Harvey


Hello all,

Thank you everybody for all your valuable input.
I can't possibly summarize everything in an answer, or quote or give appropriate credit to each method, but - in general...
I started with this idea to categorize the transistors in a way that their physical placement would somehow reflect their key characteristics... all that in order to save space and minimize the number of separate "compartments"...
But in the light of all your answers - the idea of the plastic bags or coin envelopes catch my attention the most - I got convinced that it's not all that difficult to really have the transistors separate by individual part numbers.
The bags (or coin envelopes) don't take much space, are cheap, and allow to keep the parts organized, without the need of having that many number of compartments (the envelopes become the compartments).
The discussion about being anti-static or not, well, I`m in Sao Paulo (Brazil) and humidity is usually not lower than 50% so, static is rarely an issue here.
Still, I`ll look for anti-static bags and, if they're affordable, it will be my preferred choice.

Thank you again and Rgrds,

Fabio
P.S. It seems the more OT the subject is, the more it grabs the group's attention and triggers more collaboration than anything else...
It got me thinking... Does that say something about human nature? Or about our nature (as a social group)? No answers required!



Phoenix Az. Ham fest pickups

Brendan
 

I attended the hamfest in Phoenix last Saturday. I was able to pick up a TM506 with a DC503 and a PS501 all working for $40. Also 3 2430A along with 2 TDS320 and a TDS420 for $100. One of the 2430A are a 10,000 serial number (sad face) and the other two are 30,000+ . The TDS420 has leaking SMD capacitors which I'm going to attempt to change and possibly a power supply issue. One of the TDS320s fails acq self test on channel one, but the other works perfectly. After some cleaning and swapping some broken pots on the 2430A I am left with two working 2430A a working TDS320, a working TM506 and 50/50 chance of a working TDS420. The 2430A all appear to come from the Marine Corps due to the Marine Corps calibration stickers and the TDS320 have Naval Air stickers on them. I really like how the front panel just pops off on the 2430A I was dreading changing the pots with broken shafts but the way the front comes off is pretty slick and made the job painless. The SMD caps for the TDS420 should be here Thursday so I will know more then. Hope everyone is doing well and thanks for letting me share.

Brendan


Selection criteria of TD3A in trigger circuit

thespin@...
 

In the manuals for some 500 series Tek scopes, the TD3A tunnel diode (4.7 mA, used in the astable rather than the pulse generation section) has 'selected' next to it. Does anyone know by what criteria the diode was selected?


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Brian Symons
 

eBay has several vendors selling small modular SMT / SMD Surface Mount Parts containers.
You can get them quite cheaply if you look for the bulk sales.

Just do an eBay (or better still Picclick - much better search engine for eBay) search for SMT or SMT Component Boxes.

They are a nice modular system of clip together boxes, originally designed for SMD / SMT component storage, which have transparent hinged lids that flip up 90 degrees & firmly latch closed.
Some boxes have a small metal spring to open the lid while others use a less durable system of a plastic spring.
These modular boxes are designed to clip together on all four sides & are made in a variety of sizes based on a multiple of the smallest size with a common 21mm height.
The smallest box is 25mm across the front with the latch & 31.5mm on the side (No. 1).  These boxes are ESD safe (antistatic) for storing static sensitive components.

The boxes are manufactured in a variety of colours by several different companies but some sizes are commonly available in only one or two colours on eBay.
Some similar looking clip together boxes do not fit these.  The incompatible boxes often have a module with many smaller boxes in a single unit.
Dimension L, Length, is the front side with the latch.

*No.1  25 x 31.5 x 21.5 mm  L x W x H *
Black / Blue / Brown / Green / Pink / White / Yellow
ID: 21 x 18 x 18 mm    This is the smallest module size.

*No.2  75 x 31.5 x 21.5 mm  L x W x H  Green*
Normally only green but also rarely in blue & pink.
3 modules long (front) x 1 module back.

*No.3  75 x 63 x 21.5 mm  L x W x H    Pink *
Normally only pink but also rarely in blue & green.
3 modules long (front) x 2 modules back.

*No.4  125 x 63 x 21.5 mm  L x W x H    Yellow *
Normally yellow but also rarely in blue, green, & pink.
5 modules long (front) x 2 modules back.

The great thing about these is that you can clip them together in a nice sized stack for ease of handling.
You can colour code for contents but the "alternate" colours may be more expensive.

I haven't got around to it yet but I have a cheap tool box with drawers in the front that I am going to gut & use slides of plywood in aluminium channel to make the boxes into layer drawers.
Because they are so low & small, a lot of compartments can fit into a small area.

You do find a certain number of faulty boxes.
Sometimes the hinge sort of falls apart when the box opens - you may be able to tension the spring to stop that or keep those boxes in a row other than the back one.
Often they do not fall apart if there is another row behind them.
Sometimes a box will not open fully.  Exercising it will often get it to come right.

If you do end up with too many faulty ones from an eBay seller then they normally have to either send you more or do a discount.

There are some other similar containers that are not interchangeable, often in blocks of containers, so you need to check the dimensions.

Regards,
Brian.

On 04-Dec.-18 08:56, Harvey White wrote:
On Mon, 3 Dec 2018 17:04:15 -0500, you wrote:

If you have more than a couple of each, get small pill bottles with
snap on caps, write the device number on top and keep them in order.
Make small trays slightly higher than the bottle and you can stack
them in a drawer. You could probably stuff a couple hundred in a
drawer.

Not my idea, I saw a collection of smd parts organized that way
(using smaller vials) and it was pretty impressive.
I use bead organization containers for SMD parts. Locally, Michaels
or Hobby lobby may have them. You get about 20 screw top plastic
vials in a plastic case for not too much (look for sales). These are
about 1 inch in diameter.

I put a 3/4 inch colored dot label to discriminate between 1% and 5%
resistors, for instance.

Some containers are available in a 1 3/4 (or so) diameter. Those can
be used for tape mounted SMD parts.

Be aware that these containers are not necessarily anti-static.

Things that need static protection may be left in the tape which can
be cut or curled to fit the container.

Other containers for beads, especially with locking tops, are good for
screws and nuts.

Harvey

Paul


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Fabio Trevisan
 

Hello all,

Thank you everybody for all your valuable input.
I can't possibly summarize everything in an answer, or quote or give appropriate credit to each method, but - in general...
I started with this idea to categorize the transistors in a way that their physical placement would somehow reflect their key characteristics... all that in order to save space and minimize the number of separate "compartments"...
But in the light of all your answers - the idea of the plastic bags or coin envelopes catch my attention the most - I got convinced that it's not all that difficult to really have the transistors separate by individual part numbers.
The bags (or coin envelopes) don't take much space, are cheap, and allow to keep the parts organized, without the need of having that many number of compartments (the envelopes become the compartments).
The discussion about being anti-static or not, well, I`m in Sao Paulo (Brazil) and humidity is usually not lower than 50% so, static is rarely an issue here.
Still, I`ll look for anti-static bags and, if they're affordable, it will be my preferred choice.

Thank you again and Rgrds,

Fabio
P.S. It seems the more OT the subject is, the more it grabs the group's attention and triggers more collaboration than anything else...
It got me thinking... Does that say something about human nature? Or about our nature (as a social group)? No answers required!


Re: TDS3032 does not boot. LCD backl-ight and fan working.

benj3867
 

Thanks David.
Unfortunately, holding the B-trig during power up makes no difference.

Benjamin


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Michael A. Terrell
 

My original database was custom software on a Commodore 64. Due to limited memory, I had to have multiple databases, one for each class of components.

Large quantities are in anti-static bags, in small corrugated paper boxes that fit nicely into lager boxes on the shelves. Tape and reel are sorted and stored in open topped boxes with dividers to find each reel or reels of components. I have over 500 reels of SMD components, and the latest addition is a reel of 1000 78L05 in a SOT-89 package.


Michael A. Terrell

-----Original Message-----
From: Jose Luu <jose.luu@gmail.com>
Sent: Dec 4, 2018 3:15 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

I use small bags in bins.
Inside the bag, a paper label tells the type.
If too numerous: no bag, single part number in the whole bin. (Or 2 part
numbers with very different packages)

Most important: I use partsbox.io to keep track of the bins contents


On Dec 4, 2018 9:02 AM, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@earthlink.net>
wrote:

I use small coin envelopes for bipolar transistors. Then, if they cross to
the ECG/NTE system, the envelope goes into a drawer in the 20+ 50 drawer
cabinets in the shop. I started doing this in 1970, and it has worked well.

Anything that doesn't fit that system ends up sorted in part number order
in tray bins.


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Jose Luu
 

I use small bags in bins.
Inside the bag, a paper label tells the type.
If too numerous: no bag, single part number in the whole bin. (Or 2 part
numbers with very different packages)

Most important: I use partsbox.io to keep track of the bins contents

On Dec 4, 2018 9:02 AM, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@earthlink.net>
wrote:

I use small coin envelopes for bipolar transistors. Then, if they cross to
the ECG/NTE system, the envelope goes into a drawer in the 20+ 50 drawer
cabinets in the shop. I started doing this in 1970, and it has worked well.

Anything that doesn't fit that system ends up sorted in part number order
in tray bins.


Michael A. Terrell



-----Original Message-----
From: Renée <k6fsb.1@gmail.com>
Sent: Dec 4, 2018 1:24 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted
transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Jim-your memory is fine. most likely meant both "boring" types in
similar package styles.....
Renée

On 2018-12-03 10:18 p.m., Jim Ford wrote:
Say, isn't the 2N3906 a PNP transistor? And 2N3904 is the NPN
complement? Or does my memory from 30 some odd years ago fail me?
Thanks.
Jim F.


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Michael A. Terrell
 

I use small coin envelopes for bipolar transistors. Then, if they cross to the ECG/NTE system, the envelope goes into a drawer in the 20+ 50 drawer cabinets in the shop. I started doing this in 1970, and it has worked well.

Anything that doesn't fit that system ends up sorted in part number order in tray bins.


Michael A. Terrell

-----Original Message-----
From: Renée <k6fsb.1@gmail.com>
Sent: Dec 4, 2018 1:24 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Jim-your memory is fine. most likely meant both "boring" types in
similar package styles.....
Renée

On 2018-12-03 10:18 p.m., Jim Ford wrote:
Say, isn't the 2N3906 a PNP transistor?  And 2N3904 is the NPN complement?  Or does my memory from 30 some odd years ago fail me?
Thanks.
Jim F.


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Jim Ford
 

Thanks, Renee'. The old memory is not what it used to be. Not totally
gone yet, though, evidently.

Jim

------ Original Message ------
From: "Renée" <k6fsb.1@gmail.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 12/3/2018 10:24:31 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice to sort and store
assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Jim-your memory is fine. most likely meant both "boring" types in
similar package styles.....
Renée

On 2018-12-03 10:18 p.m., Jim Ford wrote:
Say, isn't the 2N3906 a PNP transistor? And 2N3904 is the NPN
complement? Or does my memory from 30 some odd years ago fail me?
Thanks.
Jim F.


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Vladimir _ via Groups.Io"
<vladimirshs=yahoo.com@groups.io> Date: 12/3/18 8:14 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice
to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for
every part number)
I thought about four drawers, each with maybe a dozen or sixteen bins
(4 x 3 or 4 x 4).
The four drawers would be Small and Medium PNP (or P-channel) - Small
and Medium NPN (or N-channel), Large PNP - Large NPN.
I use the same system, except instead of drawers I use plastic
compartment boxes lined with aluminum foil. I also happen to have
several hundreds of "boring" small NPNs (basically 2N3906s and
similar), so that's a separate fifth group.

I keep track of individual transistors on my computer. For each group,
I have a folder with datasheets for each part number, with available
quantity and important specs (Vceo, Ic, fT, etc) in the filename.
There is also a backup copy of the entire thing on a flash drive.

This system makes it very easy to tell what's in stock and identify
substitutes. Once I decide on a specific part, all I need to do is to
look through that compartment, and I already know what the part looks
like because of the datasheet. It takes some care to set up and
maintain, but the space savings and ease of use are incredible.








---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Renée
 

Jim-your memory is fine. most likely meant both "boring" types in similar package styles.....
Renée

On 2018-12-03 10:18 p.m., Jim Ford wrote:
Say, isn't the 2N3906 a PNP transistor?  And 2N3904 is the NPN complement?  Or does my memory from 30 some odd years ago fail me?
Thanks.
Jim F.


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Vladimir _ via Groups.Io" <vladimirshs=yahoo.com@groups.io> Date: 12/3/18 8:14 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)
I thought about four drawers, each with maybe a dozen or sixteen bins (4 x 3 or 4 x 4).
The four drawers would be Small and Medium PNP (or P-channel) - Small and Medium NPN (or N-channel), Large PNP - Large NPN.
I use the same system, except instead of drawers I use plastic compartment boxes lined with aluminum foil. I also happen to have several hundreds of "boring" small NPNs (basically 2N3906s and similar), so that's a separate fifth group.

I keep track of individual transistors on my computer. For each group, I have a folder with datasheets for each part number, with available quantity and important specs (Vceo, Ic, fT, etc) in the filename. There is also a backup copy of the entire thing on a flash drive.

This system makes it very easy to tell what's in stock and identify substitutes. Once I decide on a specific part, all I need to do is to look through that compartment, and I already know what the part looks like because of the datasheet. It takes some care to set up and maintain, but the space savings and ease of use are incredible.





Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Jim Ford
 

Say, isn't the 2N3906 a PNP transistor?  And 2N3904 is the NPN complement?  Or does my memory from 30 some odd years ago fail me?
Thanks.
Jim F.


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: "Vladimir _ via Groups.Io" <vladimirshs=yahoo.com@groups.io> Date: 12/3/18 8:14 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)
I thought about four drawers, each with maybe a dozen or sixteen bins (4 x 3 or 4 x 4).
The four drawers would be Small and Medium PNP (or P-channel) - Small and Medium NPN (or N-channel), Large PNP - Large NPN.
I use the same system, except instead of drawers I use plastic compartment boxes lined with aluminum foil. I also happen to have several hundreds of "boring" small NPNs (basically 2N3906s and similar), so that's a separate fifth group.

I keep track of individual transistors on my computer. For each group, I have a folder with datasheets for each part number, with available quantity and important specs (Vceo, Ic, fT, etc) in the filename. There is also a backup copy of the entire thing on a flash drive.

This system makes it very easy to tell what's in stock and identify substitutes. Once I decide on a specific part, all I need to do is to look through that compartment, and I already know what the part looks like because of the datasheet. It takes some care to set up and maintain, but the space savings and ease of use are incredible.


Re: Viewing hood part number for 7000 series scopes

Gary Robert Bosworth
 

Dennis: I will be glad to pay what you ask for the 7000 series viewing
hood. Please send it to me and I will send off a check in the mail. I have
several 7000 series scopes and I can use 2 CRT viewing hoods at this time.

Gary Bosworth
139 E. Shrode Street
Monrovia, CA 91016



On Sun, Dec 2, 2018 at 11:54 AM Dennis Tillman W7PF <dennis@ridesoft.com>
wrote:

Hi Gary,

If you're looking for one of these I have one I don't need.
You can have it for $20 + $15 shipping instead of the $50 + $30 shipping
this one is listed for.
CONTACT ME OFF LIST if you (or anyone else) wants it at dennis at ridesoft
dot com.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: Glydeck via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, December 01, 2018 11:38 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Viewing hood part number for 7000 series scopes

There is one on eBay

https://www.ebay.com/itm/TEKTRONIX-016-0154-00-VIEWING-HOOD-
/332196485087
On Dec 1, 2018, at 8:51 PM, John Griessen <john@ecosensory.com> wrote:

On 12/1/18 10:11 PM, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:
My manuals do not list a part number for the viewing hood for any of
my 7000 series oscilloscopes.

016-0154-00 is the Batman version -- pictures tomorrow...




--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator



--
Gary Robert Bosworth
grbosworth@gmail.com
Tel: 310-317-2247


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Kevin Oconnor
 

Actually I pretty much use one bin for every type. Mostly 6-12 bin plastic trays. Have hundreds of transistors, diodes, LEDs, dip ICs, radial caps, all classified by type and functions.
Resistors come 200pc per type, so go in a plastic shoe box in ziplock bag with bar codes.
SMD parts not on reel go in envelopes in shoe box with barcode labels.
I keep an MS access DB of all semiconductors and caps I buy. I don’t keep quantity updated, but if I need a part, I can quickly tell if there is a likelihood it’s in the shop.

Kjo

Sent from kjo iPhone


Re: OT - Method of choice to sort and store assorted transistors (apart from having one bin for every part number)

Vladimir _
 

I thought about four drawers, each with maybe a dozen or sixteen bins (4 x 3 or 4 x 4).
The four drawers would be Small and Medium PNP (or P-channel) - Small and Medium NPN (or N-channel), Large PNP - Large NPN.
I use the same system, except instead of drawers I use plastic compartment boxes lined with aluminum foil. I also happen to have several hundreds of "boring" small NPNs (basically 2N3906s and similar), so that's a separate fifth group.

I keep track of individual transistors on my computer. For each group, I have a folder with datasheets for each part number, with available quantity and important specs (Vceo, Ic, fT, etc) in the filename. There is also a backup copy of the entire thing on a flash drive.

This system makes it very easy to tell what's in stock and identify substitutes. Once I decide on a specific part, all I need to do is to look through that compartment, and I already know what the part looks like because of the datasheet. It takes some care to set up and maintain, but the space savings and ease of use are incredible.

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