Date   
Re: This must be a very special manual!

mike downie
 

you have got to WONDER about some of the ?people?
who are on the EPAY system.....

a bit to much bro/sis hanky panky in previous gen's.....


mike

On 10/27/2018 11:40 AM, Albert Otten wrote:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/142990020049 Tektronix SD-24 TDR/Sampling Head User Manual Item specifics Condition: Used : Seller Notes: “Powers on and passes all Power On BIT Tests. All functions tested operate normally. Comes with 30 Day Right of Return if not 100% Happy with your purchase. Some Label/Sticker residue, dust, dirt, and possibly some pen marks may also exist. None of which effect the items functionality” Albert

This must be a very special manual!

Albert Otten
 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/142990020049
Tektronix SD-24 TDR/Sampling Head User Manual

Item specifics
Condition: Used :
Seller Notes: “Powers on and passes all Power On BIT Tests. All functions tested operate normally. Comes with 30 Day Right of Return if not 100% Happy with your purchase. Some Label/Sticker residue, dust, dirt, and possibly some pen marks may also exist. None of which effect the items functionality”

Albert

Re: 2445A option 5

Siggi
 

On Sat, 27 Oct 2018 at 12:18 <marc.nijssen@...> wrote:

When I got the 2445A the option board was not connected so I'm not sure
how to reconnect and even if all the cables are there.

Added a photo is the Photos section - is it only cables A/B/C ?
Hey Marc,

sorry I can't help with your problem. For others who may be able to help,
here's a link to the photo album: <
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=76922>.

Siggi

2445A option 5

marc.nijssen@...
 

first of all thanks to the group members for providing great info on how to repair/troubleshoot the 2445A power supply - all working fine now.

So scope is working fine except option 5 (Video Waveform Measurement System).

When I got the 2445A the option board was not connected so I'm not sure how to reconnect and even if all the cables are there.

Added a photo is the Photos section - is it only cables A/B/C ?

Your help is appreciated.

Marc

Re: Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

Chuck Harris
 

You cannot heat the button on a SS battery case to soldering
temperature without melting, and damaging the internal seal.

Spot welding is the only way that is safe for the cell.

Send me the cell, and return postage, and I would gladly do
the job for anyone that needs it done.

-Chuck Harris

battyhugh wrote:

In case anyone wasn't aware - soldering stainless steel is very easy - you need a
(small) drop of 20% orthophosphoric acid. Solders instantly (so you don't heat the
battery) - wipe it off when you have finished.
You don't need to tab.
Hugh.



Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

Mark Litwack
 

For the 24xx broken internal knob clips problem, I've had good success with 3M #4926 VHB (very high bond) foam tape. A small dot placed on the tip of the shaft extender or all the way on the inside flat area of the knob will hold it. The foam tape is only 15mil thick, so it doesn't make the knob stick out.

Like the RTV, you can pull it off again with minimal force. You can also stick it back on again if the tape it doesn't get mangled, and you don't have to wait for it to cure.

Re: Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

battyhugh
 

In case anyone wasn't aware - soldering stainless steel is very easy - you need a (small) drop of 20% orthophosphoric acid. Solders instantly (so you don't heat the battery) - wipe it off when you have finished.
You don't need to tab.
Hugh.

Re: Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

Craig Cramb
 

Thank you Craig and Kerry,
I see that this battery setup isn't an easy solution to just go and buy the replacement. Seems Kerry has been thru this himself. Let me know how your result works out. I will keep looking for the battery that Kerry is advising but prefer to locate in the US.

I've recently had to replace the original 1.35v mercury batteries in my 067-0625-00. I used 1.5v alkaline A1PX-BP1 batteries. Readily available and they are an exact fit - but you do need to have the battery supplier spot weld tags on to them for soldering.

Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

tom jobe <tomjobe@...>
 

Thank you everyone, for another fine thread about a common Tektronix scope family problem!
The only thing I can think of to add to the discussion... is that a nice dab of silicon sealant / RTV will hold the 24x5 knobs back on after you break one or more of the clips inside the knobs.
The RTV does not adhere to anything too tightly so the knobs will come off easily the next time you need to remove the front. Then you can pull out the old RTV and put in another dab of RTV to remount the same clip-less knobs again.
tom jobe...

On 10/26/2018 12:09 PM, Chuck Harris wrote:
Yep! That is one of the "pro tips" for this scope... and it
does a great job... assuming that someone hasn't been there
before you, and uhmmm, "fixed" the knobs he broke.

Epoxy is the worst! Can't get that apart without breaking
the shaft adapter...

-Chuck Harris

Tom Miller wrote:
IF you do need to remove the knobs, I have found that applying some heat from a hot
air gun will allow you to pull the knobs off without breaking the internal tabs. I
use a hot air rework gun with a small nozzle and set to 100 degrees C.

Regards,
Tom

Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

John Ferguson
 

Thanks guys. I hadn't grasped that the filter is installed facing the display and sliding the top up under the bezel and then when the bottom clears the lip of the bezel, easing the bottom down under the lip. I did it the old-fashioned way about 6 moths ago by removing the bezel.  For some reason I had no trouble with the knobs.

Thanks for explaining this to me.

john

Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

Chuck Harris
 

Yep! That is one of the "pro tips" for this scope... and it
does a great job... assuming that someone hasn't been there
before you, and uhmmm, "fixed" the knobs he broke.

Epoxy is the worst! Can't get that apart without breaking
the shaft adapter...

-Chuck Harris

Tom Miller wrote:

IF you do need to remove the knobs, I have found that applying some heat from a hot
air gun will allow you to pull the knobs off without breaking the internal tabs. I
use a hot air rework gun with a small nozzle and set to 100 degrees C.

Regards,
Tom

Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

 

IF you do need to remove the knobs, I have found that applying some heat from a hot air gun will allow you to pull the knobs off without breaking the internal tabs. I use a hot air rework gun with a small nozzle and set to 100 degrees C.

Regards,
Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: "machineguy59 via Groups.Io" <machineguy59=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: <TekScopes@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2018 2:39 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] the blue filter slot on 244* scopes


Chuck is 100% correct. DO NOT REMOVE THE BEZEL to move the blue filter (installing or removing). Bezel removal requires pulling the knob covers off the knobs below the screen. This requires skill to do without breaking the tiny fingers that hold the knobs in place. Besides, it is a nightmare to install the blue filter when the bezel is disassembled because the bezel spring cant be properly compressed when the bezel is removed. Removing/installing the blue filter is trivial unless something is broken. Here is the explanation again:
The blue filter is precisely as wide as the screen bezel opening and slightly taller. There are slots at the top of the screen and the bottom. The slot at the top has a small bent metal spring and the slot at the bottom is about 2-3 millimeters deep with nothing at the bottom. To install the blue filter you simply place the top edge of the filter against the screen and slide it up against the spring. A slight upward force with your finger tips is enough to compress the spring and let the filter slide upward. Your fingers can then press the filter against the screen and it will drop into the slot at the bottom. If this doesn't work there is dirt or something in the slots. Find out why it doesn't work before setting out to "fix" anything.

On ‎Friday‎, ‎October‎ ‎26‎, ‎2018‎ ‎01‎:‎06‎:‎19‎ ‎PM‎ ‎CDT, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

No, I am not only talking about removal.

Unless you are working with something way different than the
2465, 2465A, or 2465B, what I said applies to both removal and
installation of the blue filter.

The clear implosion filter is a whole different kettle of
fish, and its careless removal usually results in breaking the
knobs under the CRT when you remove them to remove the bezel...

-Chuck Harris

Craig Cramb wrote:
Installing requires removal of front and carefully installed so finger prints don’t make display dirty. I think Chuck is only talking about removal ,but why not remove the front and not take risk about cracking or scratches to plastic display.

Craig
On Oct 26, 2018, at 12:22 PM, John Ferguson via Groups.Io <jferg977=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

What am I missing?


john


Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

 

Chuck is 100% correct.  DO NOT REMOVE THE BEZEL to move the blue filter (installing or removing).  Bezel removal requires pulling the knob covers off the knobs below the screen.  This requires skill to do without breaking the tiny fingers that hold the knobs in place.  Besides, it is a nightmare to install the blue filter when the bezel is disassembled because the bezel spring cant be properly compressed when the bezel is removed.  Removing/installing the blue filter is trivial unless something is broken.  Here is the explanation again:
The blue filter is precisely as wide as the screen bezel opening and slightly taller.  There are slots at the top of the screen and the bottom.  The slot at the top has a small bent metal spring and the slot at the bottom is about 2-3 millimeters deep with nothing at the bottom.  To install the blue filter you simply place the top edge of the filter against the screen and slide it up against the spring.  A slight upward force with your finger tips is enough to compress the spring and let the filter slide upward.  Your fingers can then press the filter against the screen and it will drop into the slot at the bottom.  If this doesn't work there is dirt or something in the slots.  Find out why it doesn't work before setting out to "fix" anything.

On ‎Friday‎, ‎October‎ ‎26‎, ‎2018‎ ‎01‎:‎06‎:‎19‎ ‎PM‎ ‎CDT, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

No, I am not only talking about removal.

Unless you are working with something way different than the
2465, 2465A, or 2465B, what I said applies to both removal and
installation of the blue filter.

The clear implosion filter is a whole different kettle of
fish, and its careless removal usually results in breaking the
knobs under the CRT when you remove them to remove the bezel...

-Chuck Harris

Craig Cramb wrote:
Installing requires removal of front and carefully installed so finger prints don’t make display dirty. I think Chuck is only talking about removal ,but why not remove the front and not take risk about cracking or scratches to plastic display.

Craig
On Oct 26, 2018, at 12:22 PM, John Ferguson via Groups.Io <jferg977=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

What am I missing?


john


Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

Chuck Harris
 

No, I am not only talking about removal.

Unless you are working with something way different than the
2465, 2465A, or 2465B, what I said applies to both removal and
installation of the blue filter.

The clear implosion filter is a whole different kettle of
fish, and its careless removal usually results in breaking the
knobs under the CRT when you remove them to remove the bezel...

-Chuck Harris

Craig Cramb wrote:

Installing requires removal of front and carefully installed so finger prints don’t make display dirty. I think Chuck is only talking about removal ,but why not remove the front and not take risk about cracking or scratches to plastic display.

Craig
On Oct 26, 2018, at 12:22 PM, John Ferguson via Groups.Io <jferg977=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

What am I missing?


john


Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

Craig Cramb
 

Installing requires removal of front and carefully installed so finger prints don’t make display dirty. I think Chuck is only talking about removal ,but why not remove the front and not take risk about cracking or scratches to plastic display.

Craig

On Oct 26, 2018, at 12:22 PM, John Ferguson via Groups.Io <jferg977=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

What am I missing?


john

Re: the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

Chuck Harris
 

The trick.

The filter goes inside of the bezel lips, right tight against the clear
plastic implosion protection screen.

It slides up into a slot and a waiting spring, inside of the top lip
of the bezel, and the combination of gravity and spring pressure holds
it into a shallow groove along the inside of the bottom lip, of the bezel.

To remove the filter, take your fingers, and put some big finger prints
on the center of the filter, as you use your finger's friction to slide
the filter up into the groove with the retaining spring.

While the filter is in the up position, slip a fingernail under the
bottom edge of the filter and pull it towards you... If you don't have
fingernails, stick a business card under the filter's bottom edge, and
then release it. Pull the business card out, and the filter will come
with it.

-Chuck Harris

John Ferguson via Groups.Io wrote:

I have 2 2445B's and a 2465. They have moulded-in grooves in the top of the bezel,
but not slots. It appears that the only way I can put a blue filter on one of my
scopes is to remove the bezel and install it from the inside.

What am I missing?


john

Re: 2465B leaky voltage

Chuck Harris
 

I have seen so many of the IEC type power cords, made in China,
with failed wires that I am immediately suspicious of them.

I have taken a few apart, and was appalled at how crappy the
hidden connections were. Not solder, not crimp, but wires pressed
into "V" shaped nocks in the stamped brass (?) that forms the
socket and plug pins...

I just found a #14ga stranded copper wire, with a couple of
funny capsule shaped bulges in it. It had no conductivity
from end to end... So, I cut open one of the bulges, and it
was entirely filled with a copper salt. Someone probably spattered
some acid (flux?) on the bulk wire reel of the wire coating machine...
The acid slowly etched away the copper metal, and the fuse was lit,
waiting to catch some future user.

I have never seen anything like that with USA built wire.

I have seen other IEC cords where the internal insulation
turned to goo. The first sign was green goo leaking out of
the socket side of IEC cords that I left hanging from my cord
storage comb.

There seems to be a feature of human nature to always look
for the most difficult and expensive to fix failure when
seeing symptoms of simple problems. I see it in others, and
I am constantly fighting it in myself.

-Chuck Harris

ppppenguin wrote:

Chuck, thanks for laying out, step by step, what I was summarising.

The 113V reading is about what you would expect using a DVM with high (10M) input resistance with the scope's ground disconnected. It's simply the pair of Y caps in the filter acting as a potential divider. I don't know the value of the Y caps but from memory the maximum current that's allowed to flow from live to ground is about 250uA for a Class II (double insulated) appliance, somewhat more for a Class I (grounded) appliance. Even 250uA will give you a tingle, I've felt this many times when handling kit that isn't grounded.

If 1 of the Y caps in the filter was faulty I would expect the voltage reading to be either close to zero or close to full mains. The fact that it's close to half mains strongly suggests that the filter is OK and the scope's ground is missing. Also if one of the y caps was faulty I would expect a 30mA RCD (aka GFI) to trip. Assuming your lab is protected by one of these, and I really hope it is.

the blue filter slot on 244* scopes

John Ferguson
 

I have 2 2445B's and a 2465.  They have moulded-in grooves in the top of the bezel, but not slots. It appears that the only way I can put a blue filter on one of my scopes is to remove the bezel and install it from the inside.

What am I missing?


john

Re: TDS3032 Loosing its GPIB Address

David Kuhn
 

Hello again Hakan,

Hey, sorry to revisit this again. I just order one “brand new”, from China,
$38.29/shipping. I am supposed to have it sometime next month (Nov ‘18).
I’ll have to post if I’m successful . It looks like a lot of work to pull
the board out to replace the chip. Hopefully, I don’t break it. In
September, I did buy another used TDS3032, from Alltest, in NJ, for $1500
with a NIST cert, and a six month warranty. It works perfect and matches my
tired one perfectly.

I may just buy that Siglent I was thinking of for about $400/NIST cert to
play with and see if I can get a software work-around for the pulse width
measurement reference levels. It is probably fine for the rest of my data
collection work. It is so good looking and sexy for the price - lol.

Dave

On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 5:12 PM zenith5106 <hahi@...> wrote:


If you mean Tek P/N I have no idea, if you mean the Dallas number, yes it
is DS1742W-150

/Håkan



Re: 2465 CRT Smoke

dharwood1980@...
 

Gents,

Apologies for my delayed update. Unfortunately, work took me away for longer than expected.

As most of you expexted, it was just a power supply issue. I gave it the full work over this time with a good cleaning of the smoke residue near the CRT and the scope is right back in business.

Thank you all again for the helpful advice!