Date   
Re: App Notes

bobh@joba.com
 

I'll put a copy of the J16 datasheet up on the files area which includes the list of application notes.  A lot of the J16's have gone to industrial recyclers (see ebay) and the paperwork gets thrown out.

Bob.

On 3/7/2018 8:09 PM, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:
I have the names of the Tek J16 photometer and radiometer Application
Notes. I am unable to find any of them in printed form. Very odd that
these useful technical articles should essentially disappear. One that I am
especially interested in is:

Measuring Pulsed Light Sources With the J16 and an Oscilloscope 58-A-2702-1

Someone somewhere must have these useful publications.

Gary

On Sun, Mar 4, 2018 at 10:26 PM, stefan_trethan <stefan_trethan@...>
wrote:

Perhaps they could use it to demonstrate how their reputation, which
they have exploited over the later decades, was once warranted.

But who knows, maybe they don't want their current contributions,
which sometimes amount to no more than flinging crap at the
competition, measured by that.

ST

On Mon, Mar 5, 2018 at 6:06 AM, Gary Robert Bosworth
<@grbosworth> wrote:
You can't be serious.


On Sat, Mar 3, 2018 at 9:45 PM, Artekmedia <manuals@...>
wrote:
Gary
Curious ..... what is the motivation in this day and age for Tektronix
to
keep a repository of 30+ year old applications notes?
-DC
manuals@...

On 3/4/2018 12:36 AM, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:

Thank you Ronald. I hope you can find them. Hard to believe they are
not
readily available through Tektronix. Why can't Tektronix maintain a
repository?

Gary

Re: Capacitors Question?

 

Terrell

I don't know you, and you don't know me.
It is astoundingly arrogant and disrespectful of you to lecture me, with overwhelming self-presumptuousness that you are correct.
"You've never seen a modern reflow oven in operation."

Instead of making presumptuous statements, how about asking me that question, with a little respect?
If you had, you would have got the answer that I HAVE seen and monitored reflow MANY times, AND understand the 3 stages, AND used the word "bake", as a generic term, to not get into irrelevant specifics for the purpose of my posting.

On this forum, people ask questions to clarify, and don't assume.
AFAIAC, assumptions have no place in engineering environments.

Your company may do things correctly and perfectly, however, if you've ever been in a Chinese PCB factory (have you?), you would likely be astounded at how corners are cut and sloppy workmanship is the norm. I was astounded.
Little or no preheat at all, workers drinking coffee and joking during the reflow and not paying attention to the clock or temperature rise, and doing away with the controlled cooling, to save time.
That's the norm.
Does the consumer know about all that? Forget about it.

Is it any wonder that these PCB's don't last?

Yachad

Re: What calibration items to buy.

Harvey White
 

On Wed, 07 Mar 2018 20:04:29 -0800, you wrote:

Hi Ralph,
Given that the accuracy of an oscilloscope isn't that great for voltages in particular, I'd have to say you are set up more closely than many folks out there. Most analogue oscilloscopes are 2% vertical. I wouldn't worry about your Y accuracy at all. That's for DC. If you can set up a sine wave to that accuracy you're laughing. Where you're lacking is the high frequency calibration. I use a Tek PG-506 and SG-504 with leveling head. My newer digital 'scope is probably more accurate (Agilent 54642D). If you can find a way to equate your AC signal to your DC reference, you'll be more accurate than you need to be for a 'scope.

I'd like to know from someone. Are the Tek mainframe type 'scopes more accurate? I mean the ones with plug in's like a 760x series for example.
Yes and no. If you use the usual scope plugins, then the accuracy of
a 7000 series scope is as good as any other scope. You're still trying
to read a spot on a screen.

If you use the digital plugins, say frequency, period, or voltage,
then your accuracy is lots better.

Harvey


-Chris


Re: Gaining access to Tek 5403 power supply board?

Harvey White
 

On Wed, 7 Mar 2018 22:33:50 -0500, you wrote:

Hello--

Before I attempt anything really stupid (*) <g>, can anyone point me to
instructions
for gaining access to the power supply board in a Tek5403 scope?
I just opened up a 5440 scope. Remove the bottom cover. If there's a
rail catch on it, then that needs to come off too.

The power supply watch points are forward on the board, assuming it's
the same. Mine had a thoroughly charred tantalum and 5 volts was off.
Not yet fixed.


Also, does a power-supply schematic exist for this scope? DC and ripple
voltages are
out of spec for all supplies except the -30 V supply.
Likely, try the usual free spots or google the model number and manual
if you want a free one. If you want quality work, check out Artek.

Harvey


Thanks in advance, and 73--

Brad AA1IP

(*) ....Such as using a Dremel tool and cutoff disks to
remove the support bar that partially blocks access
to a couple of filter capacitors' terminals....


Re: What calibration items to buy.

 

Hi Ralph,
Given that the accuracy of an oscilloscope isn't that great for voltages in particular, I'd have to say you are set up more closely than many folks out there. Most analogue oscilloscopes are 2% vertical. I wouldn't worry about your Y accuracy at all. That's for DC. If you can set up a sine wave to that accuracy you're laughing. Where you're lacking is the high frequency calibration. I use a Tek PG-506 and SG-504 with leveling head. My newer digital 'scope is probably more accurate (Agilent 54642D). If you can find a way to equate your AC signal to your DC reference, you'll be more accurate than you need to be for a 'scope.

I'd like to know from someone. Are the Tek mainframe type 'scopes more accurate? I mean the ones with plug in's like a 760x series for example.

-Chris

Re: Storage CRT Modes Question

brasscat
 

Thanks for the responses. Gives me a better idea what to expect when
scope is repaired. Variable persistence sounds great. Those two links
to the Tektronix magazine articles was rich in information.

Stan.

Gaining access to Tek 5403 power supply board?

Brad Thompson <brad.thompson@...>
 

Hello--

Before I attempt anything really stupid (*) <g>, can anyone point me to instructions
for gaining access to the power supply board in a Tek5403 scope?

Also, does a power-supply schematic exist for this scope? DC and ripple voltages are
out of spec for all supplies except the -30 V supply.

Thanks in advance, and 73--

Brad AA1IP

(*) ....Such as using a Dremel tool and cutoff disks to
remove the support bar that partially blocks access
to a couple of filter capacitors' terminals....

Re: App Notes

Gary Robert Bosworth
 

I have the names of the Tek J16 photometer and radiometer Application
Notes. I am unable to find any of them in printed form. Very odd that
these useful technical articles should essentially disappear. One that I am
especially interested in is:

Measuring Pulsed Light Sources With the J16 and an Oscilloscope 58-A-2702-1

Someone somewhere must have these useful publications.

Gary

On Sun, Mar 4, 2018 at 10:26 PM, stefan_trethan <stefan_trethan@...>
wrote:

Perhaps they could use it to demonstrate how their reputation, which
they have exploited over the later decades, was once warranted.

But who knows, maybe they don't want their current contributions,
which sometimes amount to no more than flinging crap at the
competition, measured by that.

ST

On Mon, Mar 5, 2018 at 6:06 AM, Gary Robert Bosworth
<@grbosworth> wrote:
You can't be serious.


On Sat, Mar 3, 2018 at 9:45 PM, Artekmedia <manuals@...>
wrote:

Gary
Curious ..... what is the motivation in this day and age for Tektronix
to
keep a repository of 30+ year old applications notes?
-DC
manuals@...

On 3/4/2018 12:36 AM, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:

Thank you Ronald. I hope you can find them. Hard to believe they are
not
readily available through Tektronix. Why can't Tektronix maintain a
repository?

Gary



--
Gary Robert Bosworth
@grbosworth
Tel: 310-317-2247

Re: What calibration items to buy.

Brendan
 

I have seen that Pyramid Generator before. Looks very interesting. One on the bay for $200

Re: What calibration items to buy.

RalphJ
 

Rats! An addendum;

I forgot about the system's tendency to truncate a URL or e-mail address.

In my prior message, that should read;
REED714 (at) sbcglobal (dot) net

Enjoy, and 73;

Ralph, N7KGA
Latte Land, Washington

Re: What calibration items to buy.

RalphJ
 

Good morning, gentlemen;

Calibration. What a subject to discuss. A few of things:

(1.) I have Leo Bodnar's device. It has proven useful. When propagation has been relatively stable, a comparison with WWV has shown the device to be adequately close for at least my simple requirements.

(2.) One other device that I have, which is described as a small. portable, battery operated device for quickly checking the operation and calibration (to some level of accuracy and precision) of an oscilloscope that you may be considering for a purchase. This is the "Pyramid Generator," an "Oscilloscope Calibrator and Tester," available from BP Magnetics, 1705 Stonehenge Drive, Tustin, California 92780. Still quoting from the printing on the front of the small box, there is an e-mail address of; REED714@....

While it does claim to have a 5 V p-p square wave output, and a 3 V p-p triangular wave into a 1 MegOhm high impedance load, and a 0,3 V p-p into a low impedance 50 Ohm load, it seems to be mainly useful for checking the horizontal sweep time base and the linearity of the time base. I do not have any figures for the accuracy of the "pyramid" waveform, but it does give an indication of the linearity of the vertical amplifier, in addition to the time base.

For my limited application, it does seem to be useful, and at least it does give me some confidence in my own equipment for my limited purposes. Anyone else have any information or commentary on what certainly is at least a useful small portable checking device for an oscillograph or oscilloscope?

(3.) For my checks of the vertical amplifier, I can use a variable voltage DC power supply monitored by a John Fluke 885A DC Differential Voltmeter. That should be enough in looking at an oscillograph CRT screen to work with the limited resolution of my long out of calibration eyeball.

(4.) There is a Tek Type 105 here also, but clearly it is "well out of calibration" by now. Assuming that it is still somewhat linear, at least it does show that my vertical amplifiers are still working, and there is an obvious and approximate step change in the vertical trace as a function of the voltage selected.

For my purposes, the main utility for my collection of Tek oscilloscopes is in looking at the shape of a signal or waveform.

Finally, I do have some calibration references around here that do give me some confidence in what I am doing. I cannot claim to have any "calibration standards" here, because I know what that implies. Normally the best accuracy that I will claim is limited to about four (4) significant figures. For almost all of my work now, that is certainly enough for those tasks. For frequency I can go out quite a bit more. That is a little easier.

Enjoy, and 73;

Ralph Javins, N7KGA
Latte Land, Washington

Re: Sphere's Stuff Day coming soon--stay tuned

Edward Oscarson <scskits@...>
 

Walter:
Would be interested in an HP 11707A plug in for the 8660 generators if you have one in stock. I need it to debug an 8660D..
Thanks
ed

On Wednesday, March 7, 2018 6:14 PM, walter shawlee <@walter2> wrote:


We are trying to balance weather, roads and the best saturday for our annual stuff day event.
Easter long weekend will probably not work, as there's still a lot of snow around, and highways are bad.
so I am guessing mid-april?  we are in Kelowna, BC (Canada), not far from Seattle.

anybody interested to come up, or see some advance info on the goodies that will go free and cheap,
please email me off list. There is a ton of HP 8660 RF generator plug in stuff, PMI/Wavetek scalar analyzer gear including sensors, lots of older Tek scopes and literally tons of parts, tools, DMMs, manuals and yes, even two big 19: rack cabinets, FREE if you carry them away in your truck. also all kinds of interesting microwave doo-dads, counters and a few hundred QST/Nuts and Volts back issues, also FREE to promote more reading. We always respond to requests, so if we know you are interested, we can put it out. We have hundreds of CRTs we'd like to see in new homes, and all kinds of RF, industrial, nixie, numitron and audio tubes.

for those unable to make the trip, you might be able to persuade dennis tillman to bring back some gear to washington for you later this month, as we are already going to trade some gear in Vancouver. sort of a check-point charlie kind of thing.

anyway, hope to see some of you for stuff day!  it's always a blast.
all the best,
walter (walter2 -at- sphere.bc.ca)
sphere research corp.

Re: Tek 7623A - Inverted and compressed Horizontal only from TB (was 7623A + 7A26 + 7B53)

Fabio Trevisan
 

Thanks Leonard,
I had a look at it... Very well written.
Unfortunately I guess my problem is not on the discrete part of the
amplifier (because the readout is working correctly).
But, who knows? I still have to probe around the circuit to know the truth.
Brgrds,
Fabio

On Wed, Mar 7, 2018, 13:53 kc0wox Leeper <kc0wox@...> wrote:

Here's a link to troubleshooting a 7504 horizontal amp. It may have some
sections that are similar to yours. It starts with a power supply problem
and has a link to the horizontal amp.

http://golddredgervideo.com/kc0wox/tek/7504/

Leonard



Re: OT: Homebrew scanning electron microscopes

battyhugh
 

If you are interested (and have room) the Dove auction has a vacuum coating unit (rather needed for SEM). Beautiful piece of gear - if large.
Not sure if the primary vacuum pump is actually bolted down! Second last page.

Dove Auction (USA)

battyhugh
 

http://www.go-dove.com/en/events?cmd=details&event=501802

this seems to be a rather over-supplied auction - loads of 'scopes (Tektronic and others) and power supplies - and enough to set up your own business for a song..

Sphere's Stuff Day coming soon--stay tuned

 

We are trying to balance weather, roads and the best saturday for our annual stuff day event.
Easter long weekend will probably not work, as there's still a lot of snow around, and highways are bad.
so I am guessing mid-april? we are in Kelowna, BC (Canada), not far from Seattle.

anybody interested to come up, or see some advance info on the goodies that will go free and cheap,
please email me off list. There is a ton of HP 8660 RF generator plug in stuff, PMI/Wavetek scalar analyzer gear including sensors, lots of older Tek scopes and literally tons of parts, tools, DMMs, manuals and yes, even two big 19: rack cabinets, FREE if you carry them away in your truck. also all kinds of interesting microwave doo-dads, counters and a few hundred QST/Nuts and Volts back issues, also FREE to promote more reading. We always respond to requests, so if we know you are interested, we can put it out. We have hundreds of CRTs we'd like to see in new homes, and all kinds of RF, industrial, nixie, numitron and audio tubes.

for those unable to make the trip, you might be able to persuade dennis tillman to bring back some gear to washington for you later this month, as we are already going to trade some gear in Vancouver. sort of a check-point charlie kind of thing.

anyway, hope to see some of you for stuff day! it's always a blast.
all the best,
walter (walter2 -at- sphere.bc.ca)
sphere research corp.

FS: Computer and Electronics Magazines

Chris Wilkson
 
Edited

I have many computer and electronics magazines for sale. Some dating back to the 1940's. Fascinating reads. Especially the Radio Electronics stuff.

$1 each. Bulk discounts available. Located in Detroit, Michigan area. Contact me off list.

I uploaded a spreadsheet of what I have available. Creatively named "New Microsoft Excel Worksheet.zip".

Tek 11301 and 11302 Documentation

Kurt Rosenfeld
 

Tek 11301/11302 documentation with schematics is now available.
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/11301

New file uploaded to TekScopes@groups.io

TekScopes@groups.io Notification <TekScopes+notification@...>
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the TekScopes@groups.io group.

File: New Microsoft Excel Worksheet.zip

Uploaded By: Chris Wilkson

Description:
Computer and electronics magazines for sale.

You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/files/New%20Microsoft%20Excel%20Worksheet.zip

Cheers,
The Groups.io Team

Re: Capacitors Question?

Chuck Harris
 

All SMD aluminum electrolytics are made that way. It keeps
the rubber seal's as far as possible from the oven heat. The
plastic lead forming boots are made from a high temperature
withstanding, thermally insulating plastic material.

They even keep the aluminum cans bare, and mill colored
(white) to take advantage of aluminum's high reflectivity
at IR (heat) wavelengths... they reflect most of the heat
from the oven rather than get hot... Just like you do by
putting aluminum foil strips around a pie crust's edge
to prevent burning...but this only works so well. Keep
the heat on too long, or too hot, and it will cause a
big problem.

What kills most SMD using manufacturers is their desire to
do all of the soldering in the ovens. Even big stuff like
CAT5, USB, DB15's, HDMI, and power connectors.

They get themselves in a bind where if they want the big
stuff to get hot enough to make a good solder joint, they
have to let the little stuff, like SMD electrolytics get
too hot. They get away with it most of the time, but the
parts are damaged, and start to leak during the product's
lifetime.

The proper way to do oven soldering of large parts is to
either do them first, before installing the smaller more
thermally sensitive parts, or do them last, and put an
aluminum heat reflecting cover over the sensitive parts
before you do the oven pass for the big stuff...

But, this amounts to extra hand work, and extra passes
through the oven, and they want things to be cheap.

In my experience, the corrosive electrolyte formulations
do not end up in SMD electrolytic capacitors. Because of
all of the extra steps required to add the plastic cup
and lead forming hardware, it just isn't worth it to
shave a few microcents off by using fake electrolyte.
Even the small size of the aluminum cans puts them out
of reach of the scam artists...

The same is not true of radial leaded electrolytic caps.
They can be built on manufacturing machines that were made
in the 1960's. There is a lot of cheap surplus component
manufacturing equipment out there to enable cheating in
radial leaded capacitor manufacture.

The companies that get fooled are buying parts that are
odd name brands, and much, much cheaper than the usual
name brands. They know, they just don't care.

-Chuck Harris

Dave Casey wrote:
What about the many SMD electrolytics which are just radial electrolytics
anchored in a base with their leads bent over and cut really short?

Dave Casey

On Tue, Mar 6, 2018 at 3:25 PM, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

Not to put too fine a point on my nitpicking, but
AFAIK, the capacitor plague applied only to radial
leaded, low ESR electrolytic capacitors, not to
SMD electrolytic capacitors.
...