Date   

More odd Tek parts in the shipment

 

I have no idea what this is used for, it's a Tek Vibration Transducer, Tek p/n 015-0166-00, with a vertical displacement output of 11.5mv/.001 inch on one BNC and vertical velocity output of 650mV/inch/sec on the other. Nifty looking small Tek blue aluminum case, with a bottom screw mounting. it can be yours for US$20.


There was also a new Tek crystal oven with 10.00Mhz crystal, part number 158-0023-01. Octal base and gold anodized cylindrical can. No doubt it goes in some older time or frequency reference, also US$20.


We also got a big assortment of 155-in house Tek made ICs, 283- ceramic trimmer caps, 290- electrolytics, and 151- transistors, especially duals and FETs from the 151-10xx series. This fills a LOT of "out of stock" holes in our inventory, but I have to cross check the parts, as many were in open stock boxes, and many are generic 2N parts, so I need to be 100% certain they are all correctly identified. I sense many hours with the Tek cross-reference in my future.


There was also a heavy 2 cubic foot box filled with "master" 160- and 163- programmed parts, with hash totals listed for each part and copies also with hash data. These appear to be the actual reference units Tek used to make service repair copies of EPROMS. Looks like they are batched by the system they work in, but it will take a lot of work to sift through all of these and determine what they go to. They are all grouped together in big anti-static bags. If anybody can use them all, happy to sell off the whole lot, as I don't really have the time to fool with them all. I did not see any markings that explained what units each batch comes from. sigh.


all for today,
walter (walter2 -at- sphere.bc.ca)
sphere research corp.


Re: Some Qs on a 564

 

On Sun, 18 Oct 2015 00:57:00 -0500, you wrote:

On Oct 17, 2015, at 8:38 PM, David @DWH [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...> wrote:

The 564 manual says on page 2-2:

"For special applications, the Type 564 can be operated with only one
plug-in unit installed. When this is done, the set of deflection
plates that is not connected to a plug-in unit must have dc voltages
of approximately +180 volts applied to them from a low-impedance
source (20k or less) to permit focusing of the display. If the source
impedance is too high, flood-gun current will cause incorrect
operation of the CRT."
I will have to check the voltages. So far I have just been trying to get familiar with it. Possibly some of the power rails are out of spec. I think I may be sometimes seeing some flood gun effects.

I notice that in store mode the intensity has to be really low (dim in fact), or it will get stored.
Checking the power supply voltages is almost always the first step
when things are acting weird.

Then I would go through the CRT and storage adjustment sections of the
service manual. Just doing the procedures may reveal what is wrong if
anything. I do not know how much of that you can do without a working
timebase though.


Re: Transistor for 454A Horizontal Amp, and a manual--APOLOGY

 

28 of them at $3 each.

Well, there's your problem. :)

On Sun, 18 Oct 2015 14:22:56 -0400, you wrote:

Well, apparently I need to learn to read. Sphere does in fact list the
Tek 151-0271-00. My apologies.

Matthew


Re: Transistor for 454A Horizontal Amp, and a manual--APOLOGY

Matthew Cottrell
 

Well, apparently I need to learn to read. Sphere does in fact list the Tek 151-0271-00. My apologies.

Matthew


Re: Transistor for 454A Horizontal Amp, and a manual

David DiGiacomo
 

On Sat, Oct 17, 2015 at 3:45 PM, Matthew Cottrell <mcottrell@...> wrote:

I've been troubleshooting my 454A which has a sweep problem. Looks like
Q1038 in the horizontal amplifier may be dead. It is a Tektronix
151-0271-00 (which Sphere doesn't have). Supposedly it crosses to a
2N4261 (but that device is in a 4-pin TO-72, whereas the Tek part is a
plastic TO-18).
This page lists the MPSH69 as equivalent, which makes sense if it's
really a 3-pin 2N4261:

http://www.wbparts.com/rfq/5961-00-189-1266.html


Re: Some Qs on a 564

Martin Mehlhose
 

Joe if you Need a wiring Foto, I have 2B67 (No 701814 from Heerenveen, NL)

in my wellenkino.de community may be more owners of 2B67 who can make Pictures.

But sorry I cannot say !old or early” bec. this informations about changes by Serial No are always related to plugins from Portland.

There are also some made in Guernsey or Heerenveen, there is the numbering different.


greetings

Martin






Gesendet von Windows Mail





Von: TekScopes@...
Gesendet: ‎Sonntag‎, ‎18‎. ‎Oktober‎ ‎2015 ‎13‎:‎08
An: TekScopes@...








Joe,

Be careful with shorting clipped wires to ground (first message). You are probably also missing D126 which is soldered directly between two switch contacts. If you have a later S/N 15920-up then perhaps missing are also some resistors (R125, R127) when these are also soldered at the switch. In my older 2B67 4 wires leave the switch contacts, plus a short blank wire to the Ready light. Note that the switch has been removed in the photo at page 7-4.
To R135: separate wire via plastic support (4) at page 7-4. Yellow on white.
To R126/Q124base: separate wire to ceramic strip, 8th notch from front. Yellow on white.
To Q124emitter: in wire bundle. Yellow on white.
To ground: in same wire bundle. White. The two selector contacts are blank wired together and to the white wire. (No ground wire to to switch body or attachment screws.)

To imitate Normal mode you might ground the wire to R135 via a diode (substitute for D126, conducting to R135).

Albert


==============
From the schematic it looks like the missing switch would just lead to the scope always triggering in Normal mode, rather than single shot. Might be nice to have single shot, since I assume the storage mode is designed to store this. Though this is a much less used feature.

Googling the part number of the switch did not turn any up yet. Will have to see if stability adjustment fixes it first.

--
Joe Laffey
The Stable
Visual Effects


Re: Some Qs on a 564

Martin Mehlhose
 

Gesendet von Windows Mail





Von: TekScopes@...
Gesendet: ‎Sonntag‎, ‎18‎. ‎Oktober‎ ‎2015 ‎13‎:‎08
An: TekScopes@...








Joe,

Be careful with shorting clipped wires to ground (first message). You are probably also missing D126 which is soldered directly between two switch contacts. If you have a later S/N 15920-up then perhaps missing are also some resistors (R125, R127) when these are also soldered at the switch. In my older 2B67 4 wires leave the switch contacts, plus a short blank wire to the Ready light. Note that the switch has been removed in the photo at page 7-4.
To R135: separate wire via plastic support (4) at page 7-4. Yellow on white.
To R126/Q124base: separate wire to ceramic strip, 8th notch from front. Yellow on white.
To Q124emitter: in wire bundle. Yellow on white.
To ground: in same wire bundle. White. The two selector contacts are blank wired together and to the white wire. (No ground wire to to switch body or attachment screws.)

To imitate Normal mode you might ground the wire to R135 via a diode (substitute for D126, conducting to R135).

Albert


==============
From the schematic it looks like the missing switch would just lead to the scope always triggering in Normal mode, rather than single shot. Might be nice to have single shot, since I assume the storage mode is designed to store this. Though this is a much less used feature.

Googling the part number of the switch did not turn any up yet. Will have to see if stability adjustment fixes it first.

--
Joe Laffey
The Stable
Visual Effects


Re: Some Qs on a 564

Joe Laffey
 

This is great info. Thank you. I will check and see how the last owner had it wired up, if he did at all.


--
Joe Laffey
The Stable
Visual Effects

On Oct 18, 2015, at 6:08 AM, aodiversen@... [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...> wrote:

Joe,

Be careful with shorting clipped wires to ground (first message). You are probably also missing D126 which is soldered directly between two switch contacts. If you have a later S/N 15920-up then perhaps missing are also some resistors (R125, R127) when these are also soldered at the switch. In my older 2B67 4 wires leave the switch contacts, plus a short blank wire to the Ready light. Note that the switch has been removed in the photo at page 7-4.
To R135: separate wire via plastic support (4) at page 7-4. Yellow on white.
To R126/Q124base: separate wire to ceramic strip, 8th notch from front. Yellow on white.
To Q124emitter: in wire bundle. Yellow on white.
To ground: in same wire bundle. White. The two selector contacts are blank wired together and to the white wire. (No ground wire to to switch body or attachment screws.)

To imitate Normal mode you might ground the wire to R135 via a diode (substitute for D126, conducting to R135).

Albert


==============
From the schematic it looks like the missing switch would just lead to the scope always triggering in Normal mode, rather than single shot. Might be nice to have single shot, since I assume the storage mode is designed to store this. Though this is a much less used feature.

Googling the part number of the switch did not turn any up yet. Will have to see if stability adjustment fixes it first.

--
Joe Laffey
The Stable
Visual Effects




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Transistor for 454A Horizontal Amp, and a manual

Craig
 

Matthew,

Respond to me off line, I can probably help you with the transistor.

Craig


Re: Some Qs on a 564

Albert Otten
 

Joe,

Be careful with shorting clipped wires to ground (first message). You are probably also missing D126 which is soldered directly between two switch contacts. If you have a later S/N 15920-up then perhaps missing are also some resistors (R125, R127) when these are also soldered at the switch. In my older 2B67 4 wires leave the switch contacts, plus a short blank wire to the Ready light. Note that the switch has been removed in the photo at page 7-4.
To R135: separate wire via plastic support (4) at page 7-4. Yellow on white.
To R126/Q124base: separate wire to ceramic strip, 8th notch from front. Yellow on white.
To Q124emitter: in wire bundle. Yellow on white.
To ground: in same wire bundle. White. The two selector contacts are blank wired together and to the white wire. (No ground wire to to switch body or attachment screws.)

To imitate Normal mode you might ground the wire to R135 via a diode (substitute for D126, conducting to R135).

Albert


==============
From the schematic it looks like the missing switch would just lead to the scope always triggering in Normal mode, rather than single shot. Might be nice to have single shot, since I assume the storage mode is designed to store this. Though this is a much less used feature.

Googling the part number of the switch did not turn any up yet. Will have to see if stability adjustment fixes it first.

--
Joe Laffey
The Stable
Visual Effects


Re: Some Qs on a 564

Joe Laffey
 

On Oct 17, 2015, at 8:38 PM, David @DWH [TekScopes] <TekScopes@...> wrote:

The 564 manual says on page 2-2:

"For special applications, the Type 564 can be operated with only one
plug-in unit installed. When this is done, the set of deflection
plates that is not connected to a plug-in unit must have dc voltages
of approximately +180 volts applied to them from a low-impedance
source (20k or less) to permit focusing of the display. If the source
impedance is too high, flood-gun current will cause incorrect
operation of the CRT."
I will have to check the voltages. So far I have just been trying to get familiar with it. Possibly some of the power rails are out of spec. I think I may be sometimes seeing some flood gun effects.

I notice that in store mode the intensity has to be really low (dim in fact), or it will get stored.

If the tube and storage is working right, or could be made to work right, perhaps I could just find another horizontal module.
I would definitely make an attempt to repair it. It looks like a nice
oscilloscope when working.

I bet the horizontal modules show up on Ebay for low prices. The 2B67
seems to be the preferred timebase but apparently any of the 560
timebases will work with the 564.
In reading the docs on the 2B67, which is what I have, it looks like this may just need an adjustment of the recessed "stability" control with a screwdriver. I will give this a shot.

From the schematic it looks like the missing switch would just lead to the scope always triggering in Normal mode, rather than single shot. Might be nice to have single shot, since I assume the storage mode is designed to store this. Though this is a much less used feature.

Googling the part number of the switch did not turn any up yet. Will have to see if stability adjustment fixes it first.

--
Joe Laffey
The Stable
Visual Effects


Re: Transistor for 454A Horizontal Amp, and a manual

 

I wonder why Tektronix used such a fast transistor in the horizontal
amplifier. The preceding stage also uses the same 2 GHz PNP. With a
150 MHz vertical bandwidth, maybe they had to cut the delay to start
the sweep as soon as possible. The vertical delay line is 140
nanoseconds in the 60 MHz 453A and 120 nanoseconds in the 150 MHz
454A.

The saturated switching times are irrelevant since the transistors
operate in their linear region continuously but any fast saturated
switch also has high Ft.

The NTE395 may be perfect and you can find them for a less than $5
each. What I would try first though is slower PNP like a PN3640 from
Mouser or an MPSH81 if you can find it since they may be fast enough
and I worry that the NTE395 might oscillate.

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Central-Semiconductor/PN3640/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMshyDBzk1%2fWi8oN7VHZ91Ok7VjuYpMOPE0%3d

I would plan on changing the transistor on the opposite side as well
which is Q1048.

On 17 Oct 2015 20:34:49 -0700, you wrote:

You might try to find an NTE395. It has most of the major specs that the 2N4261 has. The datasheet doesn't give switching times, but the Ft is in the right ballpark. Don't see it listed at Mouser or Digikey, but you might find it elsewhere. Good luck,

Cheers,
Dave M

---In TekScopes@..., <mcottrell@...> wrote :

Hello folks--

I've been troubleshooting my 454A which has a sweep problem. Looks like
Q1038 in the horizontal amplifier may be dead. It is a Tektronix
151-0271-00 (which Sphere doesn't have). Supposedly it crosses to a
2N4261 (but that device is in a 4-pin TO-72, whereas the Tek part is a
plastic TO-18).

Looking up the 2N4261, it appears that my favorite surplus places don't
have any; it further appears that only MicroSemi still makes the part,
and only in full MIL-spec. Mouser and Digi-Key can special order them,
at about 40 dollars apiece!

Anyway--before I try some off-the-wall substitute, does anybody have any
suggestions?

...

Matthew Cottrell


Re: 2465B power supply - Sprague 290uF/200V big blue caps

vdonisa
 

R1010 is what I found failed (open) too.

Check the Yageo replacement as indicated in the photo caption here, it's the same size:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/photos/albums/1314606778/lightbox/708477577?orderBy=ordinal&sortOrder=asc&photoFilter=ALL#zax/708477577 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/TekScopes/photos/albums/1314606778/lightbox/708477577?orderBy=ordinal&sortOrder=asc&photoFilter=ALL#zax/708477577

(hover the mouse over the pic to see the caption).




---In TekScopes@..., <tothwolf@...> wrote :

These are the resistors in question:

A2A1R1010 15 ohm 5% 1/2W carbon film
A2A1R1019 15 ohm 5% 1/2W carbon film

A3R1020 270K ohm 5% 1/2W carbon film


The three "guides" I looked over had these as their suggested
replacements:

KOA Speer PCF2C150K 15 ohm 10% 2W ceramic composition
KOA Speer MOS2CT52R150J 15 ohm 5% 2W metal oxide
Ohmite A5F15R 15 ohm 5W wirewound

Xicon 283-270K-RC 270K 5% 3W metal oxide
Xicon 282-270K-RC 270K 5% 2W metal oxide
Vishay PR03000202703JAC00 270K 5% 3W metal film


These parts seem very excessive to me.

While I was considering replacing the two 15 ohm parts with a 1W metal
oxide, if there really is a reason to go larger with these, I think these
would be some of the parts I might consider:

KOA Speer MOS1CT52R150J 15 ohm 5% 1W metal oxide
Neohm ROX1SJ15R 15 ohm 5% 1W metal oxide
Neohm ROX2SJ15R 15 ohm 5% 2W metal oxide

Neohm ROX2SJ270K 270K 5% 2W metal oxide


Re: 2465B power supply - Sprague 290uF/200V big blue caps

Tothwolf
 

On Sat, 17 Oct 2015, David @DWH [TekScopes] wrote:
On Sat, 17 Oct 2015 19:44:00 -0500 (CDT), you wrote:

... and both listed 2W and 3W metal oxide resistors as
replacements for certain 1/2W carbon film parts.
That is a little odd. I could see using metal oxide resistors in
place of carbon composition and raising the power rating if the
originals parts ran hot.
These are the resistors in question:

A2A1R1010 15 ohm 5% 1/2W carbon film
A2A1R1019 15 ohm 5% 1/2W carbon film

A3R1020 270K ohm 5% 1/2W carbon film


The three "guides" I looked over had these as their suggested replacements:

KOA Speer PCF2C150K 15 ohm 10% 2W ceramic composition
KOA Speer MOS2CT52R150J 15 ohm 5% 2W metal oxide
Ohmite A5F15R 15 ohm 5W wirewound

Xicon 283-270K-RC 270K 5% 3W metal oxide
Xicon 282-270K-RC 270K 5% 2W metal oxide
Vishay PR03000202703JAC00 270K 5% 3W metal film


These parts seem very excessive to me.

While I was considering replacing the two 15 ohm parts with a 1W metal oxide, if there really is a reason to go larger with these, I think these would be some of the parts I might consider:

KOA Speer MOS1CT52R150J 15 ohm 5% 1W metal oxide
Neohm ROX1SJ15R 15 ohm 5% 1W metal oxide
Neohm ROX2SJ15R 15 ohm 5% 2W metal oxide

Neohm ROX2SJ270K 270K 5% 2W metal oxide


Re: Tektronix 453 high voltage problem

 

For spiral cut and some laser trimmed film resistors, the thin gap
between adjacent traces may break down.

I suspect the other thing which can happen is electromigration across
the ceramic substrate like what happens sometimes to the ceramic
terminal strips in the older Tektronix oscilloscopes sometimes. I
have also seen what may be the same thing on FR4 printed circuit
boards.

The construction difference I have seen in high voltage film resistors
is a serpentine trace instead of a spiral cut trace. To prevent
electromigration, I suspect some type of additional surface treatment
is used.

I was very surprised to find high voltage metal film resistors from
Vishay. I did not know such a thing existed and expected them to be
thick film.

Running your test on just one resistor is unlikely to cause a failure
unless you wait a long time and probably not even then. I would use a
lot of high value resistors in parallel to raise the odds of one
failure.

On 16 Oct 2015 11:16:31 -0700, you wrote:

Hi all, Still curious how high voltage actually causes a resistor to fail. (Aside from the obvious internal arcing and corona at really high voltages.) Anyway, I am currently running a very unscientific experiment. I have a -350 - 0 - +350 V power supply that I built for working with tube circuits. So, I hooked up one the 5.6 MegOhm 0.6 W metal film resistors to 700 V (722 actually) and have been letting it 'cook'. The resistor started with a measured 5.612 MegOhms. After over eight hours it still measures 5.612 MegOhms. (Measurement made with a Fluke 8840A meter.)
Unfortunately, that's as high as I go without using my bench supplies in series. But that would only give me another 100V or so anyway.
I don't claim that this is really valid testing but if nothing else, it gives me a bit more confidence.


Re: Transistor for 454A Horizontal Amp, and a manual

 

You might try to find an NTE395. It has most of the major specs that the 2N4261 has. The datasheet doesn't give switching times, but the Ft is in the right ballpark. Don't see it listed at Mouser or Digikey, but you might find it elsewhere. Good luck,


Cheers,
Dave M


---In TekScopes@..., <mcottrell@...> wrote :

Hello folks--

I've been troubleshooting my 454A which has a sweep problem. Looks like
Q1038 in the horizontal amplifier may be dead. It is a Tektronix
151-0271-00 (which Sphere doesn't have). Supposedly it crosses to a
2N4261 (but that device is in a 4-pin TO-72, whereas the Tek part is a
plastic TO-18).

Looking up the 2N4261, it appears that my favorite surplus places don't
have any; it further appears that only MicroSemi still makes the part,
and only in full MIL-spec. Mouser and Digi-Key can special order them,
at about 40 dollars apiece!

Anyway--before I try some off-the-wall substitute, does anybody have any
suggestions?

Also, if anybody can use a 454 (NOT 454A) manual, I have one free plus
shipping If you are interested send me a private e-mail at mcottrell
{at} comcast.net.

Regards,

Matthew Cottrell


Re: calib a 24xx scope

 

On 17 Oct 2015 12:06:25 -0700, you wrote:

Thx for the thoughtful input David....
Please do not take my comments are criticism. I was planning on
designing a PG506 substitute until I found a deal on a PG506 which I
restored.

The AD660ANZ is abt $30 at Newark now.
The AD660A has up to twice the integral non-linearity error making the
20mV output up to 3% off instead of 1.5%.

Perhaps boosting the current output with an emitter follower can enable a 50ohm impedance output option.That would prob. require the temperature correction & neg feedback to limit drift and using the uC ADC oversampling as a tracking err. correction plus requiring a bipolar supply to allow a 0V out. The µC can have EPROM storage of offset corrections (like the 24xx scopes) to match each build for super precision.
An emitter follower would work but it needs to be within the feedback
loop of an error correcting amplifier which will require a separate
precision operational amplifier. No negative supply is needed if a
pull-down resistor to ground is used.

A discrete e-follower output transistor bank (BC550 low noise) would offer better switching rise times with faster coulomb delivery. Perhaps a 1A PTC in the power supply rail followed by low ESR caps for limiting switching transients to ensure that shorting of the output causes no output damage.
The PG506 uses a switched current source to drive a switched resistor
network which has a 50 ohm output resistance. That makes its output
short circuit proof.

Current limiting for an emitter follower can be added with a couple of
resistors and another transistor.

Also, by using a µC front end with a LM4040A 0.1% Vref, I can do 'bootup' crosschecking of calibration with some ADC oversampling to pick up any significant problems . Having a thermistor on board could provide any immediate correction factors for the ppm drift.

This would require an output relay to keep any load disconnected during boot up cal. checks.
This is getting complicated.

This PIC looks like an option with its 12 bit ADC and diff. inputs for bipolar supply application.

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/39977f.pdf http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/39977f.pdf
Be vary careful about the precision and noise specifications of ADCs
which are integrated into microcontrollers.

I'd like to keep the cost of the whole build to < $60. It can be a DIY project (w/o a precision DMM for cal) if the uC does the tracking err ctrl and thermistor compensation is used.
Less than $60 is going to be difficult with the DAC costing half of
that.


Re: 2465B power supply - Sprague 290uF/200V big blue caps

 

On Sat, 17 Oct 2015 19:44:00 -0500 (CDT), you wrote:

... and both listed 2W and 3W metal oxide resistors as
replacements for certain 1/2W carbon film parts.
That is a little odd. I could see using metal oxide resistors in
place of carbon composition and raising the power rating if the
originals parts ran hot.


Re: 2465B power supply - Sprague 290uF/200V big blue caps

 

On 17 Oct 2015 17:27:42 -0700, you wrote:

...

Agreed on replacing tantalum with aluminum, also the leakage current is an important issue in some applications (so I wouldn't replace tantalum in a delay/timing circuit with anything but film for small caps or a new tantalum for larger capacities).
I agree film is ideal but they make low leakage aluminum electrolytics
and leakage can be further improved by using a higher voltage rating.

To add something, I just compared some 100uF aluminum on the LCR meter and the profile of DF/ESR across frequency is interesting. E.g. some brands/series start with a low ESR at 120Hz that increases over the frequency. While others are doing exactly the opposite. So eventually you have to guesstimate what kind of load they will see and choose appropriately.
My impedance bridge really only operates at 1000 Hz but I like using a
load transient response test in the actual circuit to compare
performance. This will reveal if the capacitor ESR is *too* low.


Re: Some Qs on a 564

 

The only analog storage oscilloscope I have real experience with is
the 7834 but maybe I can help.

On Sat, 17 Oct 2015 15:43:28 -0500, you wrote:

I am not sure how these old storage tubes are supposed to work, though. I am seeing some build up and memory even when the switches are set to non-store.

Can someone describe what I should see when switching from store to non-store? Also, when in non-store am I supposed to get some build up of glowing phosphor? I get little trails off the corners of moving waveforms.
In non-storage mode it should behave just like a non-storage
oscilloscope.

When I switch to store I do seem to be able to get something to store (I need to input a stable pattern and try to actually store a static image). The erase seems to work. It flashes kind of bright, but then clears the display.
My 7834 flashes when switching storage modes in some cases.

What I don't think is proper is that when I switch from store back to non-store I get a real bright flash on the corresponding half of the screen, and it then seems to "store" this nonsense that looks like radioactive waste stuck to the inside of the glass. This gradually fades quite a bit.
That does not seem right. The 564 *is* a split screen storage
oscilloscope so the top and bottom halves of the screen operate
independently but in non-storage mode the screen should be clear
except for the current trace. On my 7834, switching to storage mode
or starting in storage mode sometimes displays artifacts from the last
time it was in storage mode.

The 564 manual says on page 2-2:

"For special applications, the Type 564 can be operated with only one
plug-in unit installed. When this is done, the set of deflection
plates that is not connected to a plug-in unit must have dc voltages
of approximately +180 volts applied to them from a low-impedance
source (20k or less) to permit focusing of the display. If the source
impedance is too high, flood-gun current will cause incorrect
operation of the CRT."

If the tube and storage is working right, or could be made to work right, perhaps I could just find another horizontal module.
I would definitely make an attempt to repair it. It looks like a nice
oscilloscope when working.

I bet the horizontal modules show up on Ebay for low prices. The 2B67
seems to be the preferred timebase but apparently any of the 560
timebases will work with the 564.

http://goo.gl/EbmfFo
http://www.ebay.com/itm/TEKTRONIX-OSCILLOSCOPE-2B67-TIME-BASE-PLUG-IN-Module-TYPE-564-Storage-/131625734063