Re: Reforming Electrolytics


Miroslav Pokorni
 

By that time though, he was an old, poor, bitter and decidedly batty old
guy.
I am sorry to say, but that seems to be a fair description of Tesla's state
in the last ten or so years of his life. I guess, it can be also added that
he was hungry for attention, fame etc. The shame is that newsy would go to
see him only when business was slow. None the less, every visit by newsy
would make Tesla euphoric and in that state he seemed to have been easily
egged into making outrageous predictions, promises for future and claims for
past inventions.

I do think that it was shameful how he was manipulated by media, since, for
all his intellect, by that time he was an old and tired man. But then, that
is how newsy are, the scruples are not stock in that trade.

Regards

Miroslav Pokorni



----- Original Message -----
From: "Craig Sawyers" <c.sawyers@tech-enterprise.com>
To: "Tekscopes" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 11:31 AM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Reforming Electrolytics


Nikola Tesla had quite a few patents, too, but that doesn't mean his
death
ray was good for killing anything but small rodents unfortunate enough
to
make their nests on the 3-phase terminals.

-- john KE5FX
<grin>!

Interestingly, though, Tesla only formally patented "sensible" (however
that
is defined) things; like electrical machines (motors, generators, rf stuff
etc), frequency meters, and a VTOL aircraft. His later off-the-page death
ray, time travel, and anti-gravity ideas were never (thank heavens)
patented. By that time though, he was an old, poor, bitter and decidedly
batty old guy.

Thinking of inventors, William Dubilier (a contemporary of Tesla and
Marconi) churned out 355 patents during his life, comissioned the design
of
the earliest General Radio capacitance standards and bridges, and of
course
founded the Dubilier capacitor company. Or Edwin Land, with well over 500
patents to his name, and founder of Polaroid Corporation. Or Alan Dower
Blumlein (the inventor of stereo sound reproduction in 1933), with 128
electronics patents (including all the basic circuits for TV) before he
was
killed in 1942 at the age of 38 while testing a radar bombing system.

Craig

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