Re: Transporting a 500-Series Scope without Breaking the CRT


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It probably wasn't the rubberized horsehair that Greg was talking about
but the cardboard looking stuff that was molded to exactly fit the device
and the inside of the box. It was simply a thin walled shell, like an egg
carton. I also remember the old rubberized horsehair, the military used it
all over the place in the 1950s and it was also very effective but it was
very thick and bulky and probably added a lot of weight to the packed box.
The cardboard(?) shells OTOH were thin and light.

On Thu, May 6, 2021 at 12:04 AM greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

The packing material you referred to was likely rubberized horsehair. It
was used extensively for packing heavy items at the time, and worked
very well. The military used it as well. In the 1960s, burning trash was
fairly common in many places. If you threw that packing material in the
fire, everyone for a mile around knew it. PEEEEEUUUUU! I think there was
a similar packing that used nylon strands to replace the horsehair, it
was stiffer and had a totally different smell. Oh yeah, we always saved
all of the aerisol cans, electrolytic condensers, and batteries from the
shop to throw in the fire as well.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY




On 5/5/21 23:21, Greg Muir via groups.io wrote:
I vaguely remember receiving a new 524AD in a heavy cardboard box with a
molded rubberized fiber surrounding it forming a sort of cavity. The
material had sort of a slightly springy characteristic to it yet it didn’t
give from the weight. Upon receiving it you simply plugged it in.

These scopes were supplied by RCA as part of their complete broadcast
television packages and if I can remember were drop shipped from Tek. I
say “drop shipped” but don’t really mean it literally but the 60+ pound
weight of the scope may have caused them to experience the “real thing.”

In those days we also received the larger transmitter final tubes packed
in the same material. It seemed to be the packaging of choice in that era.

Greg








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