Re: CSA, UL/ULC and CE approvals for Tek gear


Eric
 

I get the warning but just today on the front page of MSN some one used gorilla glue instead of hairspray and now want to sue gorilla glue cause her hair has been stuck that way for a month it applied a permanent bond.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Seiter
Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 9:21 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] CSA, UL/ULC and CE approvals for Tek gear

Agreed; The first water heater I replaced about 13 years ago had a manual of around 80 pages, about 9 pages of which dealt with installation, the rest was endless warnings of one kind or another.
-Dave
On Wednesday, February 10, 2021, 05:23:35 PM PST, Petru Ulici via groups.io <petru_ulici=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello,

40 years ago the car manual shows you how to adjust the engine, now it tells you do not drink antifreeze.
Here's the real problem.

Petru

On Thursday, February 11, 2021, 03:10:44 AM GMT+2, Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info> wrote:



"It didn't say that I shouldn't pick up the lawn mower and use it to trim hedges"

California court awarded how much money?

Intelligence is no longer a survival factor.....

Harvey


On 2/10/2021 7:11 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
John Williams wrote:
The organizations such as UL and CSA or CE were no doubt founded long
before there were many imports of equipment. Now who knows where
anything comes from, including your car. So I would imagine that
enforcement would be next to impossible. But getting back to Walters
op it would seem that all requirements for any domestic producers of
test equipment would have the necessary approvals for any use, such
as schools and labs. I also believe CSA and UL were not government
organizations but some sort of independent entities. But I do not
know that.
Yes, UL is independent The NEC (National Electric Code) was also
created by insurance company to set minimum safety standards. They
operate on the other end from UL but both are intended to prevent
fires and electrocutions. UL doesn't test for other safety issuse,
like sharp edges or corners, or parts that can break off unless that
will expose voltages over 24 VAC.

It's no fun trying to educate fools, who claim they have been
electrocuted many times.





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