Re: Slightly OT: OK Electronics tinyscope


stevenhorii
 

Another tiny scope - an RF surveillance receiver made by F.G. Mason used a
small CRT as a spectrum display. The model with the tiny CRT is the Mini
Probe Receiver. Details are here in the Crypto Museum:

https://www.cryptomuseum.com/df/mason/mpr1.htm

An earlier version, the A2, used a bit larger CRT for a spectrum display:

https://www.cryptomuseum.com/df/mason/a2.htm

These receivers covered a very large frequency range (usually with multiple
tuning heads) and were also used for radio surveillance work. There's a
reason they are represented in the Crypto Museum.

Steve Horii

On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 8:30 PM Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

San Diego seemed to attract a disproportionate share of small-scope
designers. VuData and NLS were two who went into production. Prior to
them was Joe Deavenport (cofounder of Wavetek), whose CK722-based scope
(using a 1DP1) was the cover feature of the July 1957 issue of
Electrical Design News (later, EDN). It was billed as the world's first
transistorized scope. Joe later worked at NLS at some point in his
career, so maybe his fondness for small scopes rubbed off on Andy Kay.
Joe very kindly gave me his JoeScope, and it is a treasured heirloom.
I've never dared to try powering it up.

-- Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/2/2021 17:19, Greg Muir via groups.io wrote:
I remember seeing ads in the trade rags for NLS scopes back in the
70’s. I’m not sure which of the series of manufacturer products introduced
during this ears of miniature scopes but do remember that some were made in
England and other countries.

Greg









Join TekScopes@groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.