Re: Spectrum analyzer Tektronix 7L13 on mainframe Tektronix 7603


Tom Lee
 

Hi Attilio,

If your intention was/is to make frequency-response measurements with your SA in combination with a noise source, the nanoVNA will do that all by itself; no other device needed -- the nano will present a plot of frequency response magnitude and phase. So, think of the nanoVNA as a separate instrument.

There's also a related project, the tinySA, which is in the same form factor as the nanoVNA. The tinySA can also be used as a signal generator, although a rudimentary one. As with the nanoVNA, the tinySA is very inexpensive (order of $40, depending on vendor).

I have no relationship with the designers or vendors of these products, by the way. I've just been evaluating ways to keep my lab courses going in this age of COVID-forced lockdowns and remote teaching. Shipping "real" lab equipment is impractical for many obvious reasons. But the tinySA and nanoVNA go a long way toward enabling students to do all their lab experiments at home, and with a capital outlay that my department can absorb. Ironically, my biggest challenge is to find a suitable oscilloscope of similar price/performance. Getting approval to ship soldering stations and solder turned out to be a bureaucratic nightmare ("But what if students burn down their homes, or eat the solder?"). Solving that problem proved to consume much more time and energy than any other step in the process.

I'll now go back to the bench and solder something as therapy. ;)

-- Felice anno nuovo,
Tom


--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 12/29/2020 04:28, Attilio wrote:
Hi Tom,
wow fantastic this nanoVNA, I saw that there is also a V2 version, maybe I will buy it, but I didn't understand how to use it with my SA (maybe using it as generator ?).

-- Cheers,
Attilio



Join TekScopes@groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.