Re: 2% Silver


David Holland
 

Yes, It is "leaded" (soft) silver solder.

My understanding is the plating is silver based, and if you dilute the
joint too much, by using un-silvered solder, then the plating will become
unstuck.

This is the stuff I bought for working on silver strips: (I bought mine
from PE, they're local.)

https://www.parts-express.com/wbt-0800-silver-solder-4-silver-content-1-8-lb--093-586

https://www.amazon.com/WBT-0800-Silver-Solder-Content/dp/B00125OCVU

MSDS is here:
https://www.parts-express.com/pedocs/more-info/wbt-08-series-silver-solder-4-percent-silver-content-msds.pdf


Its chock full of Tin, Lead, Silver, Bismuth, Antimony, and Induim. All
the things,a growing ceramic strip needs.... :-)

(Try to ignore the audio-phool verbiage on the PE page. Audio-Phools are
PE's primary market, but I'd rather have them around, catering to them,
than not here at all.)

David

On Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 9:00 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" The "silver bearing" solder is akin to soft solder (used in making
electrical joints) and contains a relatively low proportion of silver."

Is that the type that was included inside the old 500 series scopes for
repairs? I understand that regular lead solder was not good for those
ceramic component strips in the scopes? Did it keep the plating from
unbounding to the ceramic? If that roll of solder is missing from the
scopes (and most likely is), what solder should be used for repairs? I
always thought it was some sort of silver solder? It must still contain
lead.

On Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 7:52 AM Colin Herbert via groups.io
<colingherbert=
blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

"Silver Solder" is a hard solder used in making mechanical joints such as
in jewellery. It melts at a relatively high temperature and is akin to
brazing, i.e. "hard soldering". It contains silver, copper and zinc and
maybe a little cadmium to get a lower melting-point. The "silver bearing"
solder is akin to soft solder (used in making electrical joints) and
contains a relatively low proportion of silver.
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
David
Kuhn
Sent: 22 June 2020 12:32
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2% Silver

"The tektronix solder is definitely not lead free, and you definitely
do not want to be using lead free solder on the terminal strips in
a tektronix 500 series scope. "

Hello Chuck. I thought they used "silver" solder on those? Is that not
lead free? If not, what does "Silver" solder mean?

Sorry, just curious.

Dave

On Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 12:07 AM Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com>
wrote:

The tektronix solder is definitely not lead free, and you definitely
do not want to be using lead free solder on the terminal strips in
a tektronix 500 series scope.

The Kester Sn62 solder makes beautiful joints, though.

-Chuck Harris

Randy.AB9GO wrote:
I purchased a 1 lb roll of Multicore 2% at of all things a farm
equipment
show 4-5 years ago for $3.00! No one wanted because it was too
thin.
You
just never know where stuff like this is going to show up. I will
probably
bite the bullet and buy a new roll when I need it. It makes some of
the
prettiest joints you've ever seen. I use it on everything. On the
other
end of the spectrum is lead free and unless I have to work on
something
that is already lead free I'm just not buying it or using it. Awful
awful
stuff.

randy.ab9go@gmail.com











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