Re: A few pics from a new-to-me exhibit in the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

Daniel Koller
 

I'm no nuclear science history expert, but wrt the original post,  that 535 seems out of place.  The criticality experiments were generally carried out in the 1940's and the 5 series was not available till the 1950's.  Afterall, by 1945 they knew what it took to make a pile of uranium go off.
But in the 1950's the techniques of Nuclear spectroscopy were being developed and that scope would have been at home reading the pulse outputs of scintilation counters.  I used such scopes in Columbia University's undergraduate physics labs in the 1980's for just such pulse counting.   they had not updated the labs in 30 years (!!) so it was very much like working in the 1950s
Someone correct me if I am wrong in my time estimates.
Dan

On Wednesday, November 6, 2019, 10:02:59 PM EST, <sdturne@q.com> wrote:

On Sat, Nov  2, 2019 at 01:10 AM, battyhugh wrote:


If you are in Minneapolis - on the S side of the bridge across the river on
the W side (if I remember correctly) - there is another relic - you have to
decend about 6 stories down - there are masses of HB spec analysers and a
rather large Van de Graffe generator - - very strange (I saw it in early 90's)
- A Dr Weiblen was working at that time on using high voltage pulses to bust
up moon rock. It would be rather interesting to document the remaining
residues of the 50's and 60's (on the marshes near Palo Alto is an old radio
transmission facility - might be interesting... but wait.. there's more!
Hmmm, is it an abandoned site or is someone taking care of it?

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