Re: 7K series - Conceptual question - What's the 3rd most useful plugin

Harvey White
 

On Thu, 6 Sep 2018 15:29:14 -0700, you wrote:

I see someone suggest a 7D02 you can use it in a 7603 but be very careful
it exceeds the power supplies capability yes exceeds. You will affect with
me smoke are at the best shorten the life of any 4-hole Mainframe.

And I have proof of that many times in my years at Tech I actually saw a
7.2 set a Mainframe almost on fire.

If you have the room go with a company that knows how to make logic
analyzers HP. The best deal out there right now is the 16702B. If you take
your time you can get amazing cards for it. Over the years I have filled
two of them for less than $300.

That's my opinion take it or leave it
He rather specifically wanted 7000 series plugins. While I do have a
7D20, I don't use it very much, I do have digital scopes of varying
capacity and bandwidth.

Didn't know about the high current power consumption of the 7D20,
which you'd think that Tek would have fixed since they intended it for
the 7600 series.

Without taking mine apart, are enough chips in sockets that you could
replace them with 74LS and reduce the power consumption to something
reasonable?

Any idea which supplies are the problems?

As for the 16702B, I have one. Anybody interested in a 16702A?

As I've said elsewhere. I love Tek scopes, but really, their logic
analyers drive me up a wall (and I do have a 308). HP logic analyzers
are wonderful, but I never liked their scopes.

Harvey



On Wed, Sep 5, 2018, 6:31 PM Harvey White <madyn@...> wrote:

On Wed, 05 Sep 2018 17:29:59 -0700, you wrote:

Crap, now you guys have added to my wishlist the 7D20 and 7A13! Oops, I
spoke too soon, the 7A13 is already on the wishlist!
7D20 has a GPIB connection, so I gotta have one someday. The wife will
question my impeccable logic...
Jim
<evil laugh>


Now, also consider, if you do some digital, the 7A42 is a 4 channel
plugin with combinational logic triggering. It is useful if you don't
have a separate logic analyzer. Having said that, I *do* have a logic
analyzer, and I've never used mine (the 7A42).

There's essentially three directions you can go into with electronics
design. 1) digital 2) RF 3) general purpose.

For Digital:

7A26 (a pair of them), 7D20 (yes, and even though you have a storage
scope, a digital storage scope provides a longer lasting trace). 7D02
*if* you deal with microprocessors and they're old ones (anything
newer than an AVR and including an AVR, Pic, etc... any
microcontroller, a 7D02 is likely to be less useful.) 7A42.

for RF: Consider any of the 7L spectrum analyzers depending on the
frequencies you want to play with. Not quite my field, and there are
other analyzers out there with better specs, ask the RF types.

General: Here's where the 7A13 comes in, for the low level,
moderately low frequency differential measurements (ripple on a power
supply, etc.) The 7A22 has different bandwidth filters, and less neat
offset capability. The 7A26 allows two more analog channels. 7A18
can also be considered if you only want 75 Mhz bandwidth.

When doing digital, you often want to look at more than four signals.
At this point, a logic analyzer is really your best bet (and I assume
all the signals are digital in nature). As a separate piece of
equipment, you'd want one that has at least 32 channels, and yes, I do
use that many. (monitoring *all* the ports on an ARM processor, with
one that has 4 16 bit ports, well, you need 64 data inputs. Even
though the processor I use (format wise) doesn't have a complete set
of the last 16 bits in a port, it still takes 16 bits capability, so
64 bits).

When doing RF: If you're a ham, then anything up to 1.2 Ghz covers
most of the bands you'd use, but above that means you're doing some
specialized (IMHO) microwave work. YMMV on this.

If you're doing Digital, or general purpose, and you are doing either
B, G, or N WiFi, or you're doing NRF24xxx 2.4 GHz RF, you may want a
spectrum analyzer that goes to about 3 GHz, but certainly takes in the
2.4 to 2.5 Ghz band. There are ways of working around this, but
still, much nicer.

General purpose has the fewest real specialized plugins, but the 7a13
(and mine are all digital because I *like* digital) are useful, as are
the 7A22. Again, the 7A22 has a whole host of bandwidth filters to
allow you to look at a specific frequency. There are HF filters and
low frequency filters so you could look at a specific bandwith in the
face of other frequencies, and still get a good idea.

There's other stuff out there, too, I'm sure.

I do a lot of digital, some general purpose, and not a lot of RF.

The 7904 I have is very useful, as is the Agilent 16702B logic
analyzer.

My more or less favorite load on a 7904 is a 7A26, 7D12 with an M2
plugin (sampling), a 7D15 in a horizontal slot, and a 7B92A in the
last horizontal slot. That, of course, varies.

Harvey




Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Raymond Domp Frank <
@Raymond> Date: 9/5/18 4:49 PM (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 7K series - Conceptual
question - What's the 3rd most useful plugin
On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 12:14 AM, Harvey White wrote:


You can likely feed
the counter from the vertical signal output
Yes, you can. For a permanent setup, like Fabio seems to want, I wouldn't
like a BNC plug in the socket on the front all the time but a counter *is*
very useful.
A 7D20, effectively converting the 7623A into a digital 'scope with its
own digital storage, isn't a good match for the analog storage
functionality of the 7623A. In a 7603, a 7D20 makes for a very nice 'scope.
The 7D20 is very much "analog-like".

Raymond








Join TekScopes@groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.