Re: Multimeter Calibration and Voltage Referance


J. L. Trantham
 

It's curiosity like this that leads to 'addiction' to metrology. Be
careful.



Since you will never actually know the exact value of any 'standard', you
have to have something in your lab that you would 'trust'. For me, it's a
high quality DMM. Once that is professionally calibrated, you can use it to
'measure' your 'standards' for future reference and act as a 'transfer
standard' to calibrate your other meters.



The 'standards' can be a collection of various devices (resistors, voltage
standards, inductors, capacitors, frequency standards, etc.) or a
'multi-function' calibrator. I like the Fluke 5100B series that can be had
relatively cheaply from time to time but may well need some repair to get
them up and running. It provides DC and AC voltage, resistance and current.




It also depends on what 'standards' you need in order to properly calibrate
your meters.



It's my thought to have such a 'metrology section' in my lab but I have a
long way to go.



Good luck.



Joe



From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...]
Sent: Friday, March 27, 2015 5:13 AM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: [Bulk] [TekScopes] Multimeter Calibration and Voltage Referance





It would be interesting to know how members go about and keep in check
accuracy of their workshop multimeters. I have 5 multimeters and each is
giving slightly different results. It would be nice to calibrate them to a
known voltage standard.


Of course I could pay the money and have them calibrated with the
certificate but I am just wondering if there is an easy home made method to
address this.



Henryk

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