Re: Oscilloscopes used during historical nuclear fusion research


Don Black <donald_black@...>
 

I think the scope in the still photo is American. However I believe the bench of scopes in the first part of the video are Russian (Soviet Union). If you read the text with it the Russians were the first to develop nuclear fusion in the fifties, other nations followed much later after the Russians released their research. Also in one shot of some glass tubes there is Cyrillic writing clearly visible, a sure sign of it's origins. I tried to translate it without certainty to DEITERIЙ, it might be the makers name or perhaps Deuterium (likely) . Anyone here who can read it (ДЕИТЕРИЙ). I think I've got the first letter right from the Windows character map, it's not identical, could be the Cyrillic Capital A?

Don Black.

On 26-Oct-13 9:00 AM, cheater00 . wrote:
 

Hi guys,
I've come across this cool article on the Iter Tokamak nuclear fusion
reactor. It has a video showing some very early laboratories that were
doing the research.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/one-giant-leap-for-mankind-13bn-iter-project-makes-breakthrough-in-the-quest-for-nuclear-fusion-a-solution-to-climate-change-and-an-age-of-clean-cheap-energy-8590480.html

You'll see at one point an equipment bench stocked with a row of
identical oscilloscopes, with some sort of visor attachment one could
pull over the CRT. I am wondering what the oscilloscope was, and what
the visor attachment did exactly - other than possibly block ambient
light. I'm guessing the scope was being used in single-shot mode and
it might have contained some sort of night-vision assembly to magnify
the pulse. Does anyone know what the visor was?

A similar visor/binocular is depicted here:
http://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog/0008423
The photo is dated in the 1950s and adjacent item numbers (e.g. 8422
and 8424) are about nuclear research.

You can find thousands more amazing quality photos from the same
collection here:
http://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog?f[eadid_facet][]=ua023_012

The scope in the video doesn't look exactly like a Tek. Could it have
been an HP?

I am assuming that, in line with the narrative, the video is from the
1950s. Who was making the most likely lab scopes back then? Who was
making the best - PhilCo? I understand Tek was just starting out..

The video contains a lot of other gear, have fun doing spotting!

Thanks,
Damian


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