Date   

April meeting minutes

David Andrews
 

Attached are the draft minutes of the on-the-air / Zoom meeting held on April 22.

 

Tx, David N1ESK


May TLARC meeting this Wednesday - CORRECTED LINK

David Andrews
 

Previous announcement had the wrong link. Corrected link info below.

 

The May meeting of TLARC will be held this Wednesday evening at 19:30 on Zoom. In addition to the usual business, we will act on the following items:

  1. Transfer of donated towers
  2. Address change for club call sign trustee
  3. Purchase of Zoom account
  4. Update on Vision 2020 activities
  5. Outline of current club financials

The Zoom link is provided below. Alternatively, you can call in using one of the six numbers listed.

Prior to the Zoom meeting, the TLARC Radio Net will meet on the 442.1 repeater at 19:00. We are currently looking for someone to serve as NCS for this weeks net. Please email me direct If interested.

If you would like to test your Zoom connection prior to the meeting, let me know & we’ll set up a test session.

73, David N1ESK

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88065361569?pwd=blZta3RCTnlReDFoajllc0VUQkdiZz09

Meeting ID: 880 6536 1569
Password: 701725
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,88065361569#,,1#,701725# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,88065361569#,,1#,701725# US (Chicago)

Dial by your location
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 880 6536 1569
Password: 701725
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kcgXYJajkw


CHEAP Wire, bolts, etc.

Tom Badgett
 

Just found out about this place today. Ethernet cable, electrical wiring, stainless bolts and more by the pound.
$0.05/pound for 1,000-foot roll of cat-6, for example. Large stainless bolts $0.30/pound, etc.
Rimmer Brothers, Inc.
1616 Maryville Pike
Knoxville, TN 37920
865-577-1611

On facebook as well.

Tom
K4NOX


May TLARC meeting this Wednesday

David Andrews
 

The May meeting of TLARC will be held this Wednesday evening at 19:30 on Zoom. In addition to the usual business, we will act on the following items:

  1. Transfer of donated towers
  2. Address change for club call sign trustee
  3. Purchase of Zoom account
  4. Update on Vision 2020 activities
  5. Outline of current club financials

The Zoom link is provided below. Alternatively, you can call in using one of the six numbers listed.

Prior to the Zoom meeting, the TLARC Radio Net will meet on the 442.1 repeater at 19:00. We are currently looking for someone to serve as NCS for this weeks net. Please email me direct If interested.

If you would like to test your Zoom connection prior to the meeting, let me know & we’ll set up a test session.

73, David N1ESK

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84218722426?pwd=NnZUb1V4djRLMENnU1A2Q1k2TnZoQT09

Meeting ID: 842 1872 2426
Password: 884191
One tap mobile
+19292056099,,84218722426#,,1#,884191# US (New York)
+13017158592,,84218722426#,,1#,884191# US (Germantown)

Dial by your location
        +1 929 205 6099 US (New York)
        +1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
        +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
        +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
        +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
Meeting ID: 842 1872 2426
Password: 884191

 


Re: The Great Geomagnetic Storm of May 1921

Greg Wilde AE4GW .- . ....- --. .--
 

How interesting. I had never read about this. Thanks. 



Greg Wilde
AE4GW
.- . ....- --. .--
423-333-6358

On Sun, May 17, 2020, 11:43 AM David Andrews <n1esk1@...> wrote:

The Great Geomagnetic Storm of May 1921


99 years ago this week, people around the world woke up to some unusual headlines.

“Telegraph Service Prostrated, Comet Not to Blame” — declared the Los Angeles Times on May 15, 1921. “Electrical Disturbance is ‘Worst Ever Known'” — reported the Chicago Daily Tribune. “Sunspot credited with Rail Tie-up” — deadpanned the New York Times.

They didn’t know it at the time, but those newspapers were covering the biggest solar storm of the 20th Century. Nothing quite like it has happened since.

It began on May 12, 1921 when giant sunspot AR1842, crossing the sun during the declining phase of Solar Cycle 15, began to flare. One explosion after another hurled coronal mass ejections (CMEs) directly toward Earth. For the next 3 days, CMEs rocked Earth’s magnetic field. Scientists around the world were surprised when their magnetometers suddenly went offscale, pens in strip chart recorders pegged uselessly to the top of the paper.

And then the fires began. Around 02:00 GMT on May 15th, a telegraph exchange in Sweden burst into flames. About an hour later, the same thing happened across the Atlantic in the village of Brewster, New York. Flames engulfed the switch-board at the Brewster station of the Central New England Railroad and quickly spread to destroy the whole building. That fire, along with another one about the same time in a railroad control tower near New York City’s Grand Central Station, is why the event is sometimes referred to as the “New York Railroad Superstorm.”

A photograph (Royal Greenwich Observatory) and sketch (Mount Wilson Observatory) of sunspot AR1842 on May 13, 1921. Source: “The extreme solar storm of May 1921: observations and a complextopological model

What caused the fires? Electrical currents induced by geomagnetic activity surged through telephone and telegraph lines, heating them to the point of combustion. Strong currents disrupted telegraph systems in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, the UK and USA. The Ottawa Journal reported that many long-distance telephone lines in New Brunswick were burned out by the storm. On some telegraph lines in the USA voltages spiked as high as 1000 V.

During the storm’s peak on May 15th, southern cities like Los Angeles and Atlanta felt like Fairbanks, with Northern Lights dancing overhead while telegraph lines crackled with geomagnetic currents. Auroras were seen in the USA as far south as Texas while, in the Pacific, red auroras were sighted from Samoa and Tonga and ships at sea crossing the equator.

What would happen if such a storm occurred today?

Researchers have long grappled with that question–most recently in a pair of in-depth papers published in the journal Space Weather: “The Great Storm of May 1921: An Exemplar of a Dangerous Space Weather Event” by Mike Hapgood (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) and “Intensity and Impact of the New York Railroad Superstorm of May 1921” by Jeffrey Love (US Geological Survey) and colleagues.

The summary, above, is largely a result of Hapgood’s work. He painstakingly searched historical records including scientific journals, newspaper clippings, and other reports to create a moment-by-moment timeline of the storm. Such timelines are invaluable to emergency planners, who can use them to prepare for future storms.

Locations where auroras were sighted in May 1921. The leftmost red circle marks Apia, Samoa.

Jeffrey Love and colleagues also looked into the past and–jackpot!–they found some old magnetic chart recordings that did not go offscale when the May 1921 CMEs hit. Using the data, they calculated “Dst” (disturbance storm time index), a measure of geomagnetic activity favored by many space weather researchers.

“The storm attained an estimated maximum −Dst on 15 May of 907 ± 132 nT, an intensity comparable to that of the Carrington Event of 1859,” they wrote in their paper.

This dry-sounding result upends conventional wisdom. Students of space weather have long been taught that the Carrington Event (-Dst = 900 nT) was the strongest solar storm in recorded history. Now we know that the May 1921 storm was about equally intense.

If the May 1921 storm hit today, “I’d expect it to lead to most, if not all, of the impacts outlined in the 2013 Royal Academy of Engineering report led by Paul Cannon,” says Hapgood. “This could include regional power outages, profound changes to satellite orbits, and loss of radio-based technologies such as GPS. The disruption of GPS could significantly impact logistics and emergency services.”

It’s something to think about on the 99th anniversary of a 100-year storm….

 


Re: The Great Geomagnetic Storm of May 1921

Tom Badgett
 

Great article. Thanks for sharing. Does make one think about such a natural event . . . And even more one caused by our enemies. 

Tom
K4NOX

On May 17, 2020, at 11:43, David Andrews <n1esk1@...> wrote:



The Great Geomagnetic Storm of May 1921


99 years ago this week, people around the world woke up to some unusual headlines.

“Telegraph Service Prostrated, Comet Not to Blame” — declared the Los Angeles Times on May 15, 1921. “Electrical Disturbance is ‘Worst Ever Known'” — reported the Chicago Daily Tribune. “Sunspot credited with Rail Tie-up” — deadpanned the New York Times.

<image001.jpg>

They didn’t know it at the time, but those newspapers were covering the biggest solar storm of the 20th Century. Nothing quite like it has happened since.

It began on May 12, 1921 when giant sunspot AR1842, crossing the sun during the declining phase of Solar Cycle 15, began to flare. One explosion after another hurled coronal mass ejections (CMEs) directly toward Earth. For the next 3 days, CMEs rocked Earth’s magnetic field. Scientists around the world were surprised when their magnetometers suddenly went offscale, pens in strip chart recorders pegged uselessly to the top of the paper.

And then the fires began. Around 02:00 GMT on May 15th, a telegraph exchange in Sweden burst into flames. About an hour later, the same thing happened across the Atlantic in the village of Brewster, New York. Flames engulfed the switch-board at the Brewster station of the Central New England Railroad and quickly spread to destroy the whole building. That fire, along with another one about the same time in a railroad control tower near New York City’s Grand Central Station, is why the event is sometimes referred to as the “New York Railroad Superstorm.”

<image002.jpg>

A photograph (Royal Greenwich Observatory) and sketch (Mount Wilson Observatory) of sunspot AR1842 on May 13, 1921. Source: “The extreme solar storm of May 1921: observations and a complextopological model

What caused the fires? Electrical currents induced by geomagnetic activity surged through telephone and telegraph lines, heating them to the point of combustion. Strong currents disrupted telegraph systems in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, the UK and USA. The Ottawa Journal reported that many long-distance telephone lines in New Brunswick were burned out by the storm. On some telegraph lines in the USA voltages spiked as high as 1000 V.

During the storm’s peak on May 15th, southern cities like Los Angeles and Atlanta felt like Fairbanks, with Northern Lights dancing overhead while telegraph lines crackled with geomagnetic currents. Auroras were seen in the USA as far south as Texas while, in the Pacific, red auroras were sighted from Samoa and Tonga and ships at sea crossing the equator.

What would happen if such a storm occurred today?

Researchers have long grappled with that question–most recently in a pair of in-depth papers published in the journal Space Weather: “The Great Storm of May 1921: An Exemplar of a Dangerous Space Weather Event” by Mike Hapgood (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) and “Intensity and Impact of the New York Railroad Superstorm of May 1921” by Jeffrey Love (US Geological Survey) and colleagues.

The summary, above, is largely a result of Hapgood’s work. He painstakingly searched historical records including scientific journals, newspaper clippings, and other reports to create a moment-by-moment timeline of the storm. Such timelines are invaluable to emergency planners, who can use them to prepare for future storms.

<image003.png>

Locations where auroras were sighted in May 1921. The leftmost red circle marks Apia, Samoa.

Jeffrey Love and colleagues also looked into the past and–jackpot!–they found some old magnetic chart recordings that did not go offscale when the May 1921 CMEs hit. Using the data, they calculated “Dst” (disturbance storm time index), a measure of geomagnetic activity favored by many space weather researchers.

“The storm attained an estimated maximum −Dst on 15 May of 907 ± 132 nT, an intensity comparable to that of the Carrington Event of 1859,” they wrote in their paper.

This dry-sounding result upends conventional wisdom. Students of space weather have long been taught that the Carrington Event (-Dst = 900 nT) was the strongest solar storm in recorded history. Now we know that the May 1921 storm was about equally intense.

If the May 1921 storm hit today, “I’d expect it to lead to most, if not all, of the impacts outlined in the 2013 Royal Academy of Engineering report led by Paul Cannon,” says Hapgood. “This could include regional power outages, profound changes to satellite orbits, and loss of radio-based technologies such as GPS. The disruption of GPS could significantly impact logistics and emergency services.”

It’s something to think about on the 99th anniversary of a 100-year storm….

 

<Space_Weather_Summary_Report.pdf>
<1859 Carrington Event.pdf>


The Great Geomagnetic Storm of May 1921

David Andrews
 

The Great Geomagnetic Storm of May 1921


99 years ago this week, people around the world woke up to some unusual headlines.

“Telegraph Service Prostrated, Comet Not to Blame” — declared the Los Angeles Times on May 15, 1921. “Electrical Disturbance is ‘Worst Ever Known'” — reported the Chicago Daily Tribune. “Sunspot credited with Rail Tie-up” — deadpanned the New York Times.

newspapers2

They didn’t know it at the time, but those newspapers were covering the biggest solar storm of the 20th Century. Nothing quite like it has happened since.

It began on May 12, 1921 when giant sunspot AR1842, crossing the sun during the declining phase of Solar Cycle 15, began to flare. One explosion after another hurled coronal mass ejections (CMEs) directly toward Earth. For the next 3 days, CMEs rocked Earth’s magnetic field. Scientists around the world were surprised when their magnetometers suddenly went offscale, pens in strip chart recorders pegged uselessly to the top of the paper.

And then the fires began. Around 02:00 GMT on May 15th, a telegraph exchange in Sweden burst into flames. About an hour later, the same thing happened across the Atlantic in the village of Brewster, New York. Flames engulfed the switch-board at the Brewster station of the Central New England Railroad and quickly spread to destroy the whole building. That fire, along with another one about the same time in a railroad control tower near New York City’s Grand Central Station, is why the event is sometimes referred to as the “New York Railroad Superstorm.”

sunspot

A photograph (Royal Greenwich Observatory) and sketch (Mount Wilson Observatory) of sunspot AR1842 on May 13, 1921. Source: “The extreme solar storm of May 1921: observations and a complextopological model

What caused the fires? Electrical currents induced by geomagnetic activity surged through telephone and telegraph lines, heating them to the point of combustion. Strong currents disrupted telegraph systems in Australia, Brazil, Denmark, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, the UK and USA. The Ottawa Journal reported that many long-distance telephone lines in New Brunswick were burned out by the storm. On some telegraph lines in the USA voltages spiked as high as 1000 V.

During the storm’s peak on May 15th, southern cities like Los Angeles and Atlanta felt like Fairbanks, with Northern Lights dancing overhead while telegraph lines crackled with geomagnetic currents. Auroras were seen in the USA as far south as Texas while, in the Pacific, red auroras were sighted from Samoa and Tonga and ships at sea crossing the equator.

What would happen if such a storm occurred today?

Researchers have long grappled with that question–most recently in a pair of in-depth papers published in the journal Space Weather: “The Great Storm of May 1921: An Exemplar of a Dangerous Space Weather Event” by Mike Hapgood (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) and “Intensity and Impact of the New York Railroad Superstorm of May 1921” by Jeffrey Love (US Geological Survey) and colleagues.

The summary, above, is largely a result of Hapgood’s work. He painstakingly searched historical records including scientific journals, newspaper clippings, and other reports to create a moment-by-moment timeline of the storm. Such timelines are invaluable to emergency planners, who can use them to prepare for future storms.

aurorasightings

Locations where auroras were sighted in May 1921. The leftmost red circle marks Apia, Samoa.

Jeffrey Love and colleagues also looked into the past and–jackpot!–they found some old magnetic chart recordings that did not go offscale when the May 1921 CMEs hit. Using the data, they calculated “Dst” (disturbance storm time index), a measure of geomagnetic activity favored by many space weather researchers.

“The storm attained an estimated maximum −Dst on 15 May of 907 ± 132 nT, an intensity comparable to that of the Carrington Event of 1859,” they wrote in their paper.

This dry-sounding result upends conventional wisdom. Students of space weather have long been taught that the Carrington Event (-Dst = 900 nT) was the strongest solar storm in recorded history. Now we know that the May 1921 storm was about equally intense.

If the May 1921 storm hit today, “I’d expect it to lead to most, if not all, of the impacts outlined in the 2013 Royal Academy of Engineering report led by Paul Cannon,” says Hapgood. “This could include regional power outages, profound changes to satellite orbits, and loss of radio-based technologies such as GPS. The disruption of GPS could significantly impact logistics and emergency services.”

It’s something to think about on the 99th anniversary of a 100-year storm….

 


Re: ISS overhead this evening!

Lou Devillon
 

Great pass over this way. No clouds.

Lou K4ZRP

On Sat, May 16, 2020, 9:46 PM George N2APB <n2apb@...> wrote:

Although we had ‘Clouds over My Hammy’ [with apologies to Ray Charles], we had a break in the cloud cover and the ISS was spotted almost directly overhead this evening!

 

George N2APB

 

From: TLARC@groups.io <TLARC@groups.io> On Behalf Of George N2APB
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2020 9:18 PM
To: TLARC@groups.io
Subject: [TLARC] ISS overhead this evening!

 

Remember tonight’s passing of the ISS overhead in the skies …

9:36pm to 9:43 pM.

Heading:  SW-to-NE

73. George N2APB

 

 


Re: ISS overhead this evening!

George N2APB
 

Although we had ‘Clouds over My Hammy’ [with apologies to Ray Charles], we had a break in the cloud cover and the ISS was spotted almost directly overhead this evening!

 

George N2APB

 

From: TLARC@groups.io <TLARC@groups.io> On Behalf Of George N2APB
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2020 9:18 PM
To: TLARC@groups.io
Subject: [TLARC] ISS overhead this evening!

 

Remember tonight’s passing of the ISS overhead in the skies …

9:36pm to 9:43 pM.

Heading:  SW-to-NE

73. George N2APB

 

 


ISS overhead this evening!

George N2APB
 

Remember tonight’s passing of the ISS overhead in the skies …

9:36pm to 9:43 pM.

Heading:  SW-to-NE

73. George N2APB

 

 


Re: New Vanity call sign

Greg Wilde AE4GW .- . ....- --. .--
 

Thanks George. I like it a lot especially having my initials. Funny I just started working on learning morse code and looked at how it would flow. Talk about lucky. Lol. 

Jim I wish I could get on today. Too many things going on today. I did get ground rod in place yesterday and u think I have everything I need to get my base stations setup this coming week. My HT would still work for today if only............. 



Greg Wilde
KO4CYX
423-333-6358


On Sat, May 16, 2020, 10:08 AM George N2APB <n2apb@...> wrote:
Great call sign Greg - it’s got some good swing and symmetry on CW.  Congrats!

George N2APB

On May 16, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Greg Wilde AE4GW <greg@...> wrote:

My new vanity call sign was granted this morning!

AE4GW


Re: New Vanity call sign

Jim Anderson
 

I like it, Greg. You can use it today in the Hamvention QSO Party!


On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 10:08 AM George N2APB <n2apb@...> wrote:
Great call sign Greg - it’s got some good swing and symmetry on CW.  Congrats!

George N2APB

On May 16, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Greg Wilde AE4GW <greg@...> wrote:

My new vanity call sign was granted this morning!

AE4GW


Re: New Vanity call sign

George N2APB
 

Great call sign Greg - it’s got some good swing and symmetry on CW.  Congrats!

George N2APB

On May 16, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Greg Wilde AE4GW <greg@...> wrote:

My new vanity call sign was granted this morning!

AE4GW


New Vanity call sign

Greg Wilde AE4GW .- . ....- --. .--
 

My new vanity call sign was granted this morning!

AE4GW


Sevierville TN Hamfest

 


--
73,
Michael J. Foley, K4MJF
Tellico Lake Amateur Radio Club
470 ARG


Hamvention QSO Party

 

HAMVENTION QSO PARTY
 
SATURDAY MAY 16!
 
By W8HJR, Media Chairman 03/25/2020 Event Information
 
Let’s celebrate the many years we have all had at the Great Gathering we call Hamvention. We also want to remember Ron Moorefield W8ILC who never missed a Hamvention and contributed to our club until his recent death.Let’s light up the airwaves with our remembrances of Hamventions of the past! See you on the air! K3LR, Tim Duffy and W8CI, Michael Kalter.
 
Here is the deal: 12 hour event, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDST on Saturday of Hamvention May 16, 2020. (((( Operate CW or SSB on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15 and 10 meters. The exchange is a signal report and first year you attended Hamvention. If you have never attended Hamvention you send 2020.))))
 
Send your score (number of QSOs) to [3830scores.com](https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2F3830scores.com%2F%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR1OcH6aFcQx--qGS50a-zlSAheUXgk4zCAm6VCK1C9I3Di5c16iojFmzhE&h=AT0k__1ZU3RrjZpcujyTD4uFeJwII0XoEti1-X8wYmzCgsBskUdyZ6q6vrxkfsxUF3eVT0OkRBH7aUcDwbD-vufmHqhcXzCuiEA9VASIiz0dv9iiPHi0rsw27f5zn-2jSg9-IKVyBtTTG7LLK0lqWGJdm8H2dsEygBK1u41CEBeOPnf2IQ) within 5 days of the event. You can print a certificate on line via [www.HVQP.org.](https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.HVQP.org%2F%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR0iVusfNS7m3Eo21iADd3ZR8SeODvF2s5CI9iQGbtbvnf0bKm7wgGDNGjc&h=AT3e63gec-K_9VamK0XFH3nXl_ZNX5RH2AvIhW52ag2DdsbWGVjo-6gv6RzQcYlKQbv1VJ3D9htagb5DqzQlCp5OKH_POkUWxiyV2s0gdbbhwB0VhYtoZu2DiLFmGxTBBRZIpnN6No-qkuYqVIc3_we-uvQeW_isTJDHbkhxlQ3twKIbUw) More details will appear on the Hamvention QSO Party web site being set up now.
 
Special bonus: W8BI, the club call of the Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA is the host of Hamvention) will be activated by designated DARA members from their home stations. You can add 10 points for each band/mode QSO with W8BI (12 available). So you can earn 120 bonus points (like having 120 additional QSOs)
--
73,
Michael J. Foley, K4MJF
Tellico Lake Amateur Radio Club
470 ARG


SpotTheStation (ISS)

Gary Stickel
 

FYI:
Gary - K4RQT
--------------

Begin forwarded message:

From: HQ-spotthestation@...
Date: May 15, 2020 at 11:03:37 AM EDT
Subject: SpotTheStation

Time: Fri May 15 10:24 PM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 53°, Appears: 10° above WSW, Disappears: 11° above NE


Knoxville Hamfest Cancelled

Juan Lopez
 

Got this from the reflector.

Regards,
Juan
AC6ZM


Re: Time Preference for the Weekly Nets #poll

Jim Anderson
 

I'll jump in as well. I think a 7:00 radio net followed by a Zoom presentation of whatever flavor - an educational presentation, auction, etc. would be fine. My only additional thought would be to make these twice a month, on the first and third Wednesday of the month. The third Wednesday will eventually be replaced by our in person meetings as soon as we're able, and the first Wednesday becomes an additional time that we can meet. For those who can't or don't wish to start meeting again in person because of health concerns or whatever, the first Wednesday net and Zoom presentation is a way for them to stay involved with the club. I just think a weekly net is overkill.


On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 10:10 AM Mikeljay <k4mjf.1@...> wrote:
Club members,

Personally, I don't see any reason to change the meeting time to one earlier than one we would normally have. To me, having a meeting at 6:30pm takes away from my time with the family during the normal dinner hour.

Normally we would have a face to face meeting at 7pm, which would last 30 to 45 minutes, to conduct any normal Club business, then move on to any discussion or presentation, which would usually last until 8:30 or 9pm

During the time that we can't currently have a face to face meeting, we can conduct our "normal" Club meeting on the repeater, then move to ZOOM for any presentation afterwards, because you don't have to have a FCC license to use ZOOM, so ANYONE can join in, or give a presentation.

My vote is to move the meeting time back to 7pm on the Club repeater, followed by a presentation or whatever on ZOOM.
--
73,
Michael J. Foley, K4MJF
Tellico Lake Amateur Radio Club
470 ARG


Re: Time Preference for the Weekly Nets #poll

Gary Stickel
 

I agree with Michael: our regular meeting time used to work just fine for me. And club meeting @ 7, followed by a Zoom session, mirrors our previous meeting format, which also worked fine, IMHO.

Gary K4RQT
==============

On May 14, 2020, at 10:10 AM, Mikeljay <@Mikeljay> wrote:

My vote is to move the meeting time back to 7pm on the Club repeater, followed by a presentation or whatever on ZOOM.
--
73,
Michael J. Foley, K4MJF