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SBB Cargo Changes


csipromo
 

It was a big day for news regarding SBB Cargo and I have many questions...

To start with, Railcolor.net reported that 35% of SBB Cargo will be controlled by Swiss Combi AG, a joint venture composed of Planzer (40%), Camions Transport (40%), Galliker (10%) and Bertschi (10%). As part of this agreement, SBB Cargo International will fall under the administration of SBB. SBB Cargo International is controlled by SBB (75%) and Hupac (25%).

It was also reported in Drehscheibe Online that SBB Cargo intends to sell it's fleet of Bombardier Re 482.

I don't know if there is any direct connection, but if SBB Cargo is divesting itself of it's international operations (SBBCI), it may no longer require the Re 482, which were primarily used in Germany and on runs into or through Germany.

Bertschi was previously a minority partner in Rail4Chem before that company was sold to Veolia, taken over by SNCF and integrated into their ITL/Captrain operation.

My question is how will this affect operations and locomotive ownership? The Re 474, 482, 484 were owned by SBB Cargo. I don't know if some were registered with SBB Cargo Italia or SBB Cargo. The Vectrons (LokRoll) were leased by SBB Cargo International. As far as I know, the latest lease deal (Suedleasing) was also SBBCI. AFAIK the ELL (Vectron) and MRCE (ES64F4) leases were also under SBBCI.

Will this scramble the fleet and how will it be structured from here on out?

Regards

Mike C


John Beaulieu
 

Interesting that this just concerns domestic SBB Cargo operations and doesn't include SBBCI. I wonder about the sale of the Re482 locomotives as they would seem to be logical replacements for the Re420/421/430 locomotives which have rheostatic electrical braking rather than regenerative braking. Will the fact that the older locomotives are fully depreciated be enough to offset the electrical power costs that could be saved using the newer locomotives, The newer locomotives have meters to measure electric power usage, while I doubt that the
older locomotives have such equipment. Also with the slow spread of ETCS signalling across Switzerland, will it be cost effective to continue to equip older locomotives with the necessary
equipment?

John Beaulieu


csipromo
 

SBB Cargo is the freight division of SBB. They sold 35% to a Consortium made up of several transport companies. I guess that because Hupac is a partner in SBB Cargo International, they probably would have opposed the deal, so the solution was to make SBBCI a separate division under SBB, which I guess would completely separate the two divisions from each other. I don't know how this will work. Will SBB Cargo only handle domestic traffic and contracts with other operators (DB Schenker, etc) or will they eventually start competing for international business and start their own operations outside of Switzerland?

Will SBBCI rely on it's own traction or will it still work with SBB Cargo or SBB for transportation through Switzerland?

I know that the Re 482s were seeing less demand since the economic turndown (2008) and that they are limited to CH/DE and maybe AT while newer leased machines can operate in D/A/CH/I/NL (the main north-south corridor). It is cheaper to lease locomotives with ECTS and multination homologation than to adapt the older machines. I am surprised that SBB Cargo did not work out some kind of lease exchange with MRCE or Railpool where the 482 would go for German/Austrian operators and SBB Cargo would get a break on new leases.

Regards

Mike C


Guerbetaler
 

Am 05.09.2019 um 01:26 schrieb csipromo via Groups.Io:
My question is how will this affect operations and locomotive ownership?
good question. wrong audience... :-)

The Re 474, 482, 484 were owned by SBB Cargo. I don't know if some
were registered with SBB Cargo Italia or SBB Cargo.
all registered with SBBC. SBBCI has no vehicle registered anywhere.

The Vectrons (LokRoll) were leased by SBB Cargo International.
yes, SBBIN. But you can't see this from the inscriptions.

As far as I know, the latest lease deal (Suedleasing) was also
SBBCI.
no, SBBIN

AFAIK the ELL (Vectron) and MRCE (ES64F4) leases were also under
SBBCI.
AFAIK SBBIN


Guerbetaler
 

Am 05.09.2019 um 21:26 schrieb John Beaulieu:
Interesting that this just concerns domestic SBB Cargo operations and
doesn't include SBBCI.i
The companies involved are those that took over the LCL business (label
Cargo Domizil) from SBB some 20 years ago.

I wonder about the sale of the Re482 locomotives as they would seem to be logical replacements for the Re420/421/430 locomotives which have rheostatic electrical braking rather than regenerative braking.
Re 420/421/430 have been equipped with regenerative braking from
delivery. This is an important difference to BLS Re 425, which are
equipped with dc traction motors versus ac single phase motors on the
SBB locomotives.

Will the fact that the older locomotives are fully depreciated be enough to offset the electrical power costs that could be saved
using the newer locomotives, The newer locomotives have meters to
measure electric power usage, while I doubt that the older
locomotives have such equipment. Also with the slow spread of ETCS
signalling across Switzerland, will it be cost effective to continue
to equip older locomotives with the necessary equipment?
SBB equipped also older locomotives with meters. Thus, the limiting factor for the use of Re 420 etc. will be the rise of maintenance costs.

ETCS L1LS is now complete and all locomotives can work on it. Quite an important number of locomotives has been equipped to work on L2. But adding further lines to L2 operation will only start in 2025 or even later.

Markus, Gürbetal


csipromo
 

Sorry. Once again I keep referring to SBB Cargo International as SBBCI when the official label SBB IN is used.
I did not mean it as anything other than an abbreviation of SBB Cargo International to save typing time.

Is any more information about the separation between the new SBB Cargo and SBB IN (SBB Cargo International) known?
I am specifically curious about the impact (if any) of these changes on the tractive power.
The MRCE (ES64F4) and Vectron (ELL, LokRoll and Suedleasing) machines were leased by SBB IN
According to Markus, the Re 474, 482, 484 are registered with SBBC.
If SBBCI (SBB Cargo Italia) now falls under SBB IN (separate from SBB Cargo), what will happen to the Re 474 and 484s routinely used by SBBCI?
I guess that the same thing could be said about SBB Cargo Deutschland and the Re 482s.

Regards

Mike C


John Beaulieu
 

Re 420/421/430 have been equipped with regenerative braking from
delivery. This is an important difference to BLS Re 425, which are
equipped with dc traction motors versus ac single phase motors on the
SBB locomotives.

So these locomotives have the ability to convert variable frequency AC as generated by the traction motors to 16.7 Hz AC to be fed back into the contact line? Otherwise they would be limited to one speed in regenerative braking as the AC frequency generated by the motors would depend on their rotational speed and the number of poles.

John Beaulieu


Guerbetaler
 

Am 07.09.2019 um 21:29 schrieb John Beaulieu:
So these locomotives have the ability to convert variable frequency
AC as generated by the traction motors to 16.7 Hz AC to be fed back
into the contact line? Otherwise they would be limited to one speed
in regenerative braking as the AC frequency generated by the motors
would depend on their rotational speed and the number of poles.
Aren't you thinking of three-phase motors?

Already the Crocodiles Ce 6/8" (1920-22) came with a regenerative brake which was designed by Behn-Eschenburg. I can't explain you in detail how it works. But basically you need an excitation with 16.7 Hz from the transformer/overhead line.

Markus, Gürbetal