Topics

P/400 & C400 Cauge Clearances along the Lötschberg Rout

John Beaulieu
 

I am curious as to why these clearances are available along this corridor. Specifically why was it necessary to enlarge the clearances on the mountain route, yet all the tunnels between Fruitigen and Basel via the Hauenstein Base Tunnel are cleared on either track. For members who don't understand my question, I was watching a video on "Rail way Emotions" channel showing a Cab Ride on a SIM train (Simplon Inter-Modal) from Brig to Basel Muttenz Yard, via the Lötschberg mountain route. The changes of track from side to side at various locations where only one of the two tracks had the necessary clearance for trailers or containers with 4.0 meters of height at the outside corners. Within Switzerland only this route (and of course via the LBT) and the route from Kreuzlingen to St. Margarethen are cleared for Intermodal trains transporting equipment requiring this height. I think the route aloong the Bodensee lacks aany tunnels so it wasn't a problem. I also know that workk along the Gotthard route is also in progress to allow these to pass that way, although it is going to take some years to complete the work.

Guerbetaler
 

Am 09.10.2019 um 19:47 schrieb John Beaulieu:
I am curious as to why these clearances are available along this
corridor.
I do not really understand your question. Or you might also have asked, why a railway line over the Lötschberg is available.

In other words: If this clearance wouldn't have been available (before opening of the LBT), where would such transports have gone through?

Markus, Gürbetal

csipromo
 

Modifications were undertaken on assorted Swiss routes to permit the operation of the IC2000 double deck coaches as well as for new clearance requirements for modern container and trailer carrying cars. On the BLS route (Loetschberg), the modifications on some parts of the route were initially done on one of the two tracks only. I presume that this was because the clearances were not sufficient for modern traffic when the existing route was converted from a single line to a double track. The work consisted of lowering the floor of the tunnels and widening the tunnels in some cases to allow for the safe operation of modern traffic on that route.

I have never heard the term SIM for trains. The terms used are KLV and UKV and the route is usually referred to as the Loetschberg route.

Regards

Mike C

Ewan Tait
 

KLV and UKV refer to combined and unaccompanied container trains. SIM
refers to the loading gauge of specific trains.

https://www.bahnforum.ch/lexicon/index.php/Entry/90-Sim/

--
http://ewan.me.uk

On 9 Oct 2019, at 20:32, csipromo via Groups.Io <csipromo=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have never heard the term SIM for trains. The terms used are KLV and UKV
and the route is usually referred to as the Loetschberg route.

John Beaulieu
 

In other words: If this clearance wouldn't have been available (before
opening of the LBT), where would such transports have gone through?

Markus, Gürbetal

These Trailers and Containers were traveling over the Highways because the
Railways could not handle them when they were first introduced. They are a
fairly recent development. Their development was in answer to Highway
hauliers
need for more cubic capacity in trailers. According to this diagram;

file:///C:/Users/Owner/Downloads/INTERUNIT-map2013%20(1).pdf

I was aware that there had been tunnel enlargement to handle the IC2000
passenger
carriages, but I was not sure if this was enough to also provide clearance
to the larger
trailers and containers. According to the diagram in the Eisenbahn Atlas
Schwiez only
one track may be used between Iselle and Preglia in Italy, although both
may be used
in the Simplon Tunnel. My guess would be that the tight curvature inside
the Varso Spiral
Tunnel is the culprit.

For Mike, the term "SIM" is to help Signallers keep track of those
Intermodal trains that
require running on specific tracks between Domodossola and Fruitigen, not
all Intermodal
trains handle these taller trailers and containers. Even the same train
schedule may not
have high trailers on some days, and since it requires special handling
when they do require
it, they receive a special code.

John Beaulieu

On Wed, Oct 9, 2019 at 4:20 PM Ewan Tait <ewan@...> wrote:

KLV and UKV refer to combined and unaccompanied container trains. SIM
refers to the loading gauge of specific trains.

https://www.bahnforum.ch/lexicon/index.php/Entry/90-Sim/

--
http://ewan.me.uk

On 9 Oct 2019, at 20:32, csipromo via Groups.Io <csipromo=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have never heard the term SIM for trains. The terms used are KLV and UKV
and the route is usually referred to as the Loetschberg route.



csipromo
 

I think that prior to the modifications to the Loetschberg route, all oversize container and trailer traffic had to take the Gotthard route or be routed via Lausanne/Rhone valley. I remember it was discussed in the Loetschberg Cab Ride video that I bought from TEE USA (Eurolokshop). I will have to watch it again some time.

Regards

Mike C

Guerbetaler
 

Am 10.10.2019 um 04:41 schrieb csipromo via Groups.Io:
I think that prior to the modifications to the Loetschberg route, all
oversize container and trailer traffic had to take the Gotthard route
or be routed via Lausanne/Rhone valley.
No, it was as John said, they all had to take the road. The Gotthard still isn't available for high cube and full size piggy back. This should be ready by 2020. And this will also allow double deck passenger trains.

Markus, Gürbetal

Guerbetaler
 

Am 10.10.2019 um 01:45 schrieb John Beaulieu:
These Trailers and Containers were traveling over the Highways because the Railways could not handle them when they were first introduced.
That's absolutely correct. Thus I still don't understand your original
question.

Am 09.10.2019 um 19:47 schrieb John Beaulieu:
I am curious as to why these clearances are available along this
corridor.
Answer see at the top!?

Toma Bacic
 

On Thu, Oct 10, 2019 at 8:27 PM Guerbetaler wrote:

No, it was as John said, they all had to take the road. The Gotthard
still isn't available for high cube and full size piggy back. This
should be ready by 2020. And this will also allow double deck passenger
trains.
Somewhere I've read that SBB is planing to modify "2nd 4 meters
corridor"... Any details?

regards & thank you
toma

john_dmj
 

On 11 October 2019 at 00:01 Toma Bacic <toma.bacic@...> wrote:


On Thu, Oct 10, 2019 at 8:27 PM Guerbetaler wrote:

No, it was as John said, they all had to take the road. The Gotthard
still isn't available for high cube and full size piggy back. This
should be ready by 2020. And this will also allow double deck passenger
trains.
Somewhere I've read that SBB is planing to modify "2nd 4 meters
corridor"... Any details?
What was the 'Purple route' through the Lötschberg?

Guerbetaler
 

Am 10.10.2019 um 20:31 schrieb Toma Bacic:
On Thu, Oct 10, 2019 at 8:27 PM Guerbetaler wrote:
No, it was as John said, they all had to take the road. The Gotthard
still isn't available for high cube and full size piggy back. This
should be ready by 2020. And this will also allow double deck passenger
trains.
Somewhere I've read that SBB is planing to modify "2nd 4 meters
corridor"... Any details?
The second 4 m corridor is the Gotthard route. This was ordered (and is paid for) by the Confederation in order to allow the growing number of high cube containers to cross the Alps on two routes. This is badly needed because any of the two routes may be closed for some time, maybe for maintenance, maybe due to nature forces.

While the GBT was built for a larger clearance, the Bötzberg Tunnel and some of the shorter tunnels along the Lake of Lucerne needed treatment. In the case of the Bötzberg the solution was to build a new tunnel instead of refurbishing and widening the old one.

Markus, Gürbetal

Guerbetaler
 

Am 10.10.2019 um 20:58 schrieb john_dmj:
What was the 'Purple route' through the Lötschberg?
That's the signal colour of the SIM (see previous posts)

John Beaulieu
 

My original question derived from the fact that I was aware of the clearance project for Dosto passenger carriages, but from looking at the map it seems that not all of the routes cleared for Dosto stock have sufficient clearances for 4.0 meter trailers. Now this doesn't appear to be a problem on routes that lack tunnels, hence the fact that the route from Kruezlingen to St. Margarethen is shown as clear. Is there such a map published by the BAV or perhaps by SBB Infra showing clearances within Switzerland? The portion of the map covering Switzerland as published by Interunit for the UIRR shows non-standard colors for Switzerland and relies on notations.

As a separate question is the tunnel just west of Aarau station cleared for 4.0 meter high containers? It seems odd if it wasn't as that tunnel is the only one separating the Intermodal terminal at Aarau from the cleared lines. Also does anyone know if the Heitersberg Tunnel has enough clearance? This would allow a terminal to be sited in the Zürich area and also possibly to reach the existing terminal at Glattbrug.

John Beaulieu

Guerbetaler
 

Am 09.10.2019 um 21:32 schrieb csipromo via Groups.Io:
I have never heard the term SIM for trains.
Look at the official document
Designation of trains 2020 (PDF, 886 KB)
at
<https://company.sbb.ch/en/sbb-as-business-partner/services-rus/onestopshop/track-access.html>

There you will find that train numbers 43500-43799 and 63400-63799
are SIM trains. These numbers are recognised by signal box software,
so that these trains will always remain on tracks where they are
allowed.

Markus, Gürbetal

Guerbetaler
 

Am 11.10.2019 um 22:51 schrieb John Beaulieu:
Is there such a map published by the BAV or perhaps by SBB Infra showing clearances within Switzerland?
Such maps have to be published by the infrastructure manager. Information is in I-30111 AB-FDV, but I can't find this at the moment. The newest version is from 01.07.2019.

Markus, Gürbetal

John Beaulieu
 

Thank you Markus, with the code 1-30111 AB-FDV is was able to find the PDF containing all the information I was looking for and more. I will be digging through the wealth of information for quite some time. The complete document for 2019 is available regarding access to the SBB Railway network at this address;

https://www.trasse.ch/file/2.5%20Network%20Statement/2.5.2%20SBB/C1_Network_Statement_SBB_2019_EN.pdf

John Beaulieu

Guerbetaler
 

Am 12.10.2019 um 21:27 schrieb John Beaulieu:
https://www.trasse.ch/file/2.5%20Network%20Statement/2.5.2%20SBB/C1_Network_Statement_SBB_2019_EN.pdf
This is the Network Statement. AB-FDV I-30111 is still an additional document, which also contains maps. I will find it, but perhaps next week.

Markus, Gürbetal