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CEVA aka Léman Express

gordonwis
 

CEVA opened to regular public service as planned (but with quirks see below) on Sunday 14 December. I rode the line in mid morning.

Needless to say the SNCF strike ruined the concept on its first day. CFF worked manfully to operated the service as if it was operating correctly, so, in order to keep the Swiss side (especially east of Cornavin to Coppet) working correctly trains between Coppet and Cornavin were labelled (for example) 'Annecy' but once these reached Chene Bourg they were turned back, wrecking the platforming regime at Chene Bourg. All 'international' workings terminated at Annemasse.

In the bizarre SNCF strike scenario, announcements for French destinations were constantly made at Annemasse in the format: "le train TER numéro xxx à destination de xxx (eg St Gervais) partira de la Gare Routière"

It was announced that a few 'CEVA' trains were planned to run to Evian, and certainly indicators at Annemasse suggested there would be at least one late afternoon.

Notwithstanding, as someone whose interest in European railways was fostered in the 1960s to a large extent by seeing trains in the Annemasse area it was bizarre to hear a pure SNCF style train announcement including local stations and a destination on the CFF main line to Lausanne! Another thing to get used to is that Genève Eaux Vives is now a purely 'SBB' station with Swiss railway paraphernalia.

I also rode the new tram line in Annemasse, now operating as the eastern end of Line 17. To anyone not familiar with the area, CGTE (now TPG) route 12 ran from Moillesulaz frontier to Annemasse until closed in 1958.

Paul Burkhalter
 

Thank you Gordon. A shame the experience was spoilt by the strike, I wonder if SBB have a standby timetable for this (not uncommon) SNCF event!
Anyway, hopefully you can report on a proper through journey when possible, together with images of SBB trains in hitherto unusual places.
My vision of a circular service around the lake using a reopened Tonkin line (Evian to St Gingolph) remains as a hopeless dream! I note that the main level crossings have now been tarmaced over.
Paul

Guerbetaler
 

Am 19.12.2019 um 02:31 schrieb gordonwis via Groups.Io:
Another thing to get used to is that Genève Eaux Vives is now a
purely 'SBB' station with Swiss railway paraphernalia.
In a 1912 contract it was fixed (in art. 7) that the Eaux-Vives - frontier line would become part of SBB "as soon as" the connection between Eaux-Vives and Cornavin would be inaugurated. Construction of the line should start in 1918. Now, finally it was inaugurated, but no sooner than 107 years later...

<https://www.admin.ch/opc/fr/classified-compilation/19120011/index.html>

Markus, Gürbetal

Thomas
 

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 10:44 PM, gordonwis wrote:

CEVA opened to regular public service as planned (but with quirks see below)
on Sunday 14 December. I rode the line in mid morning.

Needless to say the SNCF strike ruined the concept on its first day. CFF
worked manfully to operated the service as if it was operating correctly, so,
in order to keep the Swiss side (especially east of Cornavin to Coppet)
working correctly trains between Coppet and Cornavin were labelled (for
example) 'Annecy' but once these reached Chene Bourg they were turned back,
wrecking the platforming regime at Chene Bourg. All 'international' workings
terminated at Annemasse.
On Monday, with way less passengers on the system as the inauguration celebrations had ended, and despite the SBB website maintaining that all services would continue to operate to Chêne-Bourg and half-hourly to Annemasse, they decided to cancel those services which would have turned over at Chêne-Bourg and only operating half-hourly to Annemasse during non-rush hour, instead of running empty trains.

Rgds, Thomas.