Why read scripture?


David Markham
 

There is something about reading a text that is revered by a community, with a reach that is often worldwide and handed down through millennia. The practice of applying it to our own lives can help us feel less alone and more connected to a truth larger than ourselves. It prompts us to examine how we are called to be and what we are called to do in this world. This reflection is the beginning of wisdom. Scripture, then, can illuminate how, individually and collectively, we have come to where we are, and can push us toward more profound truth.
 
Johnstone, Jonalu. Scripture Unbound: A Unitarian Universalist Approach (p. xii). Skinner House Books. Kindle Edition. 
 
I love the mystical story about the finger pointing at the moon which reminds us not to mistake the finger for the moon.
 
It is interesting how religious people come to worship the finger. They make an idol out of it. They make the finger their god.
 
The point of looking at the finger is to discern where and to what it is pointing. The finger is a compass to help us find our way to our destination. We read and study scripture in the hope it will help us better find the moon and arrive at our destination.
 
Unitarian Universalists covenant together to affirm and promote a free and responsible search for truth and meaning. Scripture can be a road atlas that can help us journey on our way to our destination.
 
What maps have you found helpful on your spiritual journey? How were they helpful? What part of your trip did they help you be more efficient and effective in your travels? How did you use them best? How have they led you astray? Did you ever find yourself lost and found a map that helped you orient yourself so you could proceed on your way?
 


Carol Mannchen
 

David -- I do not have this book yet.  I hate buying books, my library doesn't have it, and I am having trouble with the Inter-library loan thing.  I may just go ahead and get it from Amazon.  I feel that I am a good fit with the Unitarians, but am unwilling to give up my present church.  The Unitarian Universalist Church is way across town from me, plus, it would break my heart to give up the liturgy I know -- Catholic/Episcopalean/Lutheran.  

Anyway, I will get the book and read it.  I assume it is for a month.  As far as the fingers go, my fingers have all been people.  My grandmother was Irish, and devout, yet at the same time, she could drink like a sailor and was not at all prudish.  Then there was my convert Dad, who had to convert to marry my Irish Mom, and the Jesuits somehow got hold of him.  He became a real Catholic and actually would try to convert some of his friends.  After he died, I found his original baptismal certificate, and it was Episcopalean, I had never known.  And of course there are others, priests and ministers since then.  Now, I have this brilliant son, who I sent to a Jesuit college, who wonders how I can believe all this stuff.  I don't know.  My beliefs change from day to day.  I used to say my belief is this -- There is a God, and it is not me.

Looking forward to some good discussions.
Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 7:36 PM David Markham <davidgmarkham@...> wrote:
There is something about reading a text that is revered by a community, with a reach that is often worldwide and handed down through millennia. The practice of applying it to our own lives can help us feel less alone and more connected to a truth larger than ourselves. It prompts us to examine how we are called to be and what we are called to do in this world. This reflection is the beginning of wisdom. Scripture, then, can illuminate how, individually and collectively, we have come to where we are, and can push us toward more profound truth.
 
Johnstone, Jonalu. Scripture Unbound: A Unitarian Universalist Approach (p. xii). Skinner House Books. Kindle Edition. 
 
I love the mystical story about the finger pointing at the moon which reminds us not to mistake the finger for the moon.
 
It is interesting how religious people come to worship the finger. They make an idol out of it. They make the finger their god.
 
The point of looking at the finger is to discern where and to what it is pointing. The finger is a compass to help us find our way to our destination. We read and study scripture in the hope it will help us better find the moon and arrive at our destination.
 
Unitarian Universalists covenant together to affirm and promote a free and responsible search for truth and meaning. Scripture can be a road atlas that can help us journey on our way to our destination.
 
What maps have you found helpful on your spiritual journey? How were they helpful? What part of your trip did they help you be more efficient and effective in your travels? How did you use them best? How have they led you astray? Did you ever find yourself lost and found a map that helped you orient yourself so you could proceed on your way?
 


David Markham
 

Hi Carol:

So good to read your post.

No need for one to change their church affiliation. God comes in many flavors. I always like the saying that "My God is too big for anyone's religion."

I was raised Roman Catholic and was in the seminary studying for the priesthood during my adolescence. I like to call myself a Roman Catholic Unitarian Universalism.

Francis David, the pioneer Unitarian in the sixteenth century that we need not think alike to love alike.

The book is available on Amazon. 

Til next time,

Keep the faith! 😊

David Makrham

On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 9:04 PM Carol Mannchen <oldlawmom@...> wrote:
David -- I do not have this book yet.  I hate buying books, my library doesn't have it, and I am having trouble with the Inter-library loan thing.  I may just go ahead and get it from Amazon.  I feel that I am a good fit with the Unitarians, but am unwilling to give up my present church.  The Unitarian Universalist Church is way across town from me, plus, it would break my heart to give up the liturgy I know -- Catholic/Episcopalean/Lutheran.  

Anyway, I will get the book and read it.  I assume it is for a month.  As far as the fingers go, my fingers have all been people.  My grandmother was Irish, and devout, yet at the same time, she could drink like a sailor and was not at all prudish.  Then there was my convert Dad, who had to convert to marry my Irish Mom, and the Jesuits somehow got hold of him.  He became a real Catholic and actually would try to convert some of his friends.  After he died, I found his original baptismal certificate, and it was Episcopalean, I had never known.  And of course there are others, priests and ministers since then.  Now, I have this brilliant son, who I sent to a Jesuit college, who wonders how I can believe all this stuff.  I don't know.  My beliefs change from day to day.  I used to say my belief is this -- There is a God, and it is not me.

Looking forward to some good discussions.
Carol Mannchen

Hermitage, TN
oldlawmom@...
615-310-4504




On Tue, Dec 29, 2020 at 7:36 PM David Markham <davidgmarkham@...> wrote:
There is something about reading a text that is revered by a community, with a reach that is often worldwide and handed down through millennia. The practice of applying it to our own lives can help us feel less alone and more connected to a truth larger than ourselves. It prompts us to examine how we are called to be and what we are called to do in this world. This reflection is the beginning of wisdom. Scripture, then, can illuminate how, individually and collectively, we have come to where we are, and can push us toward more profound truth.
 
Johnstone, Jonalu. Scripture Unbound: A Unitarian Universalist Approach (p. xii). Skinner House Books. Kindle Edition. 
 
I love the mystical story about the finger pointing at the moon which reminds us not to mistake the finger for the moon.
 
It is interesting how religious people come to worship the finger. They make an idol out of it. They make the finger their god.
 
The point of looking at the finger is to discern where and to what it is pointing. The finger is a compass to help us find our way to our destination. We read and study scripture in the hope it will help us better find the moon and arrive at our destination.
 
Unitarian Universalists covenant together to affirm and promote a free and responsible search for truth and meaning. Scripture can be a road atlas that can help us journey on our way to our destination.
 
What maps have you found helpful on your spiritual journey? How were they helpful? What part of your trip did they help you be more efficient and effective in your travels? How did you use them best? How have they led you astray? Did you ever find yourself lost and found a map that helped you orient yourself so you could proceed on your way?