Topics

Will a 9-A leadscrew work for a 9-C to 9-B conversion (no quickchange)?


Mark Moulding
 

(My first post here - be kind!)

I'm sure this topic has been beaten to death, but I'm still a bit fuzzy on one point.  I'm attempting up upgrade my SB 9" model 'C' to a 'B'.  The lathe is in very good shape - a bit dirt from disuse, but no real rust, and very low hours.  I've purchased on eBay a "model A or B" apron, and a "9 or 10K crossfeed screw" (with the gear that my 9C screw lacks).  So I think the only thing I also need is a new leadscrew.  Will a 9A (quick-change gearbox) leadscrew work, or do I need a 9B?

Thanks!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


George Meinschein
 

Mark,
The 9A leadscrew is a different animal.  The 9B is the same as a 9C except for the keyway slot on the 9B. I think that's all correct, but I'll gladly defer to someone more knowledgeable. 

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500

Email: george.meinschein@...
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

   

On Sun, Mar 29, 2020, 9:31 PM Mark Moulding <mark@...> wrote:
(My first post here - be kind!)

I'm sure this topic has been beaten to death, but I'm still a bit fuzzy on one point.  I'm attempting up upgrade my SB 9" model 'C' to a 'B'.  The lathe is in very good shape - a bit dirt from disuse, but no real rust, and very low hours.  I've purchased on eBay a "model A or B" apron, and a "9 or 10K crossfeed screw" (with the gear that my 9C screw lacks).  So I think the only thing I also need is a new leadscrew.  Will a 9A (quick-change gearbox) leadscrew work, or do I need a 9B?

Thanks!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Jim_B
 

George is correct. 
The feed end of the 9A screw is different than the 9B and 9C. 
A 9B would be Ideal. 
You could use your existing 9C screw if you could cut a slot in it with your mill. 
You would need to do it in steps. 

-8
Jim B,

On Mar 29, 2020, at 9:31 PM, Mark Moulding <mark@...> wrote:

(My first post here - be kind!)

I'm sure this topic has been beaten to death, but I'm still a bit fuzzy on one point.  I'm attempting up upgrade my SB 9" model 'C' to a 'B'.  The lathe is in very good shape - a bit dirt from disuse, but no real rust, and very low hours.  I've purchased on eBay a "model A or B" apron, and a "9 or 10K crossfeed screw" (with the gear that my 9C screw lacks).  So I think the only thing I also need is a new leadscrew.  Will a 9A (quick-change gearbox) leadscrew work, or do I need a 9B?

Thanks!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


--
Jim B


william twombley
 

Bed length. Is also a determining factor.

I converted a 54” C to a B but. Snared a perfect 42” bed in the process.

I bought a Leadscrew for a 42 inch B. I can measure that if you have a 42! That powered apron is so nice. I haven’t even put the Half nuts back in! Small mod to the C type saddle to clear the crossfeed. splines. I added 200 div, ‘ direct reading” dials along the way too.

Several styles of cross feed screws for 9As and Bs/ 10k . Makes a nice machine!

I gotta take the headstock and Horiz drive apart, 1 “Moe” time for a poly V ribbed belt. Yep, Hanging from the overhead lite the last 5 yrs. That apron clutch is great! Check your xfeed Screw to drivegear engagement. For. “ cogging, or over-depthing mesh. 7 thou shim ‘tween apron and saddle was just the trick!

Mine was Fine, lightly tightend, but cogged at full torque!

If you don’t “Gorilla grip” the star wheel,; The apron clutch kicks right out, if you bang against a “stop”!

It has a 1941 S.N. BUT, more like that Caddy that Johnny cash sang about!

Being able to read the dials without a telescope is nice!

Mike


Mark Moulding
 

My next question was going to be about how difficult it would be to cut that keyway.  I have a bench-top mill, and also the milling attachment for the South Bend (and I guess there'd be no problem running it without a lead screw for a while).

It seems to me that a huge amount of precision wouldn't be necessary, but it would be a whole new operation for me, and therefore a bit intimidating.  What would be the best way to hold the screw in a vise - rigidly, but without damage?  In fact, what would the whole procedure be?  (I got the "do it in sections" part.)  That screw is probably hardened, right?  So, carbide cutters? A milling saw if I can come up with one? Anyone know the dimensions of that keyway?

Or is this dicey enough that I should just wait until a 9B leadscrew surfaces on eBay?  (It's a 36" six-speed - the absolute cheapest model one could buy.  My dad bought it new...)

Thanks for the input - I really appreciate it!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


mike allen
 

        ya can probably use one from a longer lathe , just cut it & turn the end to fit in the support

        animal



On 3/29/2020 7:55 PM, Mark Moulding wrote:
My next question was going to be about how difficult it would be to cut that keyway.  I have a bench-top mill, and also the milling attachment for the South Bend (and I guess there'd be no problem running it without a lead screw for a while).

It seems to me that a huge amount of precision wouldn't be necessary, but it would be a whole new operation for me, and therefore a bit intimidating.  What would be the best way to hold the screw in a vise - rigidly, but without damage?  In fact, what would the whole procedure be?  (I got the "do it in sections" part.)  That screw is probably hardened, right?  So, carbide cutters? A milling saw if I can come up with one? Anyone know the dimensions of that keyway?

Or is this dicey enough that I should just wait until a 9B leadscrew surfaces on eBay?  (It's a 36" six-speed - the absolute cheapest model one could buy.  My dad bought it new...)

Thanks for the input - I really appreciate it!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Andrei
 

You cannot cut the keyway with the lathe attachment. Well, you probably could, but it would be easier to hammer bamboo sticks under your fingernails. 

Ideally, you would have a friend with a mill large enough to cut it in one pass, but if not, you could set it up and cut the keyway in sections. 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Mark Moulding <mark@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Will a 9-A leadscrew work for a 9-C to 9-B conversion (no quickchange)?
 
My next question was going to be about how difficult it would be to cut that keyway.  I have a bench-top mill, and also the milling attachment for the South Bend (and I guess there'd be no problem running it without a lead screw for a while).

It seems to me that a huge amount of precision wouldn't be necessary, but it would be a whole new operation for me, and therefore a bit intimidating.  What would be the best way to hold the screw in a vise - rigidly, but without damage?  In fact, what would the whole procedure be?  (I got the "do it in sections" part.)  That screw is probably hardened, right?  So, carbide cutters? A milling saw if I can come up with one? Anyone know the dimensions of that keyway?

Or is this dicey enough that I should just wait until a 9B leadscrew surfaces on eBay?  (It's a 36" six-speed - the absolute cheapest model one could buy.  My dad bought it new...)

Thanks for the input - I really appreciate it!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Harley Schlinger
 

I have cut many of keys with a milling attachment on a 10 inch Logan and now my 14inch South Bend over the past 50 years, Lathes were around many years before milling machines just look at the tooling that was made for the Old South Been Lathes say nothing about all the tooling that Machinist came up for a special item they were making, it’s all about Time and Ingenuity, Just rember the first lathe was not built on a lathe so don’t say it CAN’T BE DONE.

P.S.  You can keep Hammering Bamboo under your finger nails I don’t do pain,



On Wednesday, April 1, 2020, 12:08:13 PM PDT, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


You cannot cut the keyway with the lathe attachment. Well, you probably could, but it would be easier to hammer bamboo sticks under your fingernails. 

Ideally, you would have a friend with a mill large enough to cut it in one pass, but if not, you could set it up and cut the keyway in sections. 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Mark Moulding <mark@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Will a 9-A leadscrew work for a 9-C to 9-B conversion (no quickchange)?
 
My next question was going to be about how difficult it would be to cut that keyway.  I have a bench-top mill, and also the milling attachment for the South Bend (and I guess there'd be no problem running it without a lead screw for a while).

It seems to me that a huge amount of precision wouldn't be necessary, but it would be a whole new operation for me, and therefore a bit intimidating.  What would be the best way to hold the screw in a vise - rigidly, but without damage?  In fact, what would the whole procedure be?  (I got the "do it in sections" part.)  That screw is probably hardened, right?  So, carbide cutters? A milling saw if I can come up with one? Anyone know the dimensions of that keyway?

Or is this dicey enough that I should just wait until a 9B leadscrew surfaces on eBay?  (It's a 36" six-speed - the absolute cheapest model one could buy.  My dad bought it new...)

Thanks for the input - I really appreciate it!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Ondrej Krejci
 

Cutting the keyway with the lathe milling attachment will be a tad tedious.  A Miracle Point level would be handy.  Making the keyway slightly undersize and using a keyway file to bring in the fit and smooth the transitions would be the way to go.

Best of Luck

On Wednesday, April 1, 2020, 07:37:49 PM EDT, Harley Schlinger via groups.io <old1940@...> wrote:


I have cut many of keys with a milling attachment on a 10 inch Logan and now my 14inch South Bend over the past 50 years, Lathes were around many years before milling machines just look at the tooling that was made for the Old South Been Lathes say nothing about all the tooling that Machinist came up for a special item they were making, it’s all about Time and Ingenuity, Just rember the first lathe was not built on a lathe so don’t say it CAN’T BE DONE.

P.S.  You can keep Hammering Bamboo under your finger nails I don’t do pain,



On Wednesday, April 1, 2020, 12:08:13 PM PDT, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


You cannot cut the keyway with the lathe attachment. Well, you probably could, but it would be easier to hammer bamboo sticks under your fingernails. 

Ideally, you would have a friend with a mill large enough to cut it in one pass, but if not, you could set it up and cut the keyway in sections. 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Mark Moulding <mark@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Will a 9-A leadscrew work for a 9-C to 9-B conversion (no quickchange)?
 
My next question was going to be about how difficult it would be to cut that keyway.  I have a bench-top mill, and also the milling attachment for the South Bend (and I guess there'd be no problem running it without a lead screw for a while).

It seems to me that a huge amount of precision wouldn't be necessary, but it would be a whole new operation for me, and therefore a bit intimidating.  What would be the best way to hold the screw in a vise - rigidly, but without damage?  In fact, what would the whole procedure be?  (I got the "do it in sections" part.)  That screw is probably hardened, right?  So, carbide cutters? A milling saw if I can come up with one? Anyone know the dimensions of that keyway?

Or is this dicey enough that I should just wait until a 9B leadscrew surfaces on eBay?  (It's a 36" six-speed - the absolute cheapest model one could buy.  My dad bought it new...)

Thanks for the input - I really appreciate it!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


john kling
 

For a given bed length the 9a lead screw is shorter than the 9b - the gear box takes up some space. I have seen  people adapt the 9a lead screw to a b set up by turning  fill in shaft for the tail stock end.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 9:31:45 PM EDT, Mark Moulding <mark@...> wrote:


(My first post here - be kind!)

I'm sure this topic has been beaten to death, but I'm still a bit fuzzy on one point.  I'm attempting up upgrade my SB 9" model 'C' to a 'B'.  The lathe is in very good shape - a bit dirt from disuse, but no real rust, and very low hours.  I've purchased on eBay a "model A or B" apron, and a "9 or 10K crossfeed screw" (with the gear that my 9C screw lacks).  So I think the only thing I also need is a new leadscrew.  Will a 9A (quick-change gearbox) leadscrew work, or do I need a 9B?

Thanks!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Sam
 

I don't understand why you need to change the leadscrew

B to A yes, but from C to B, I don't see why


On Sun, Nov 29, 2020 at 8:37 AM john kling via groups.io <jkling222=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
For a given bed length the 9a lead screw is shorter than the 9b - the gear box takes up some space. I have seen  people adapt the 9a lead screw to a b set up by turning  fill in shaft for the tail stock end.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 9:31:45 PM EDT, Mark Moulding <mark@...> wrote:


(My first post here - be kind!)

I'm sure this topic has been beaten to death, but I'm still a bit fuzzy on one point.  I'm attempting up upgrade my SB 9" model 'C' to a 'B'.  The lathe is in very good shape - a bit dirt from disuse, but no real rust, and very low hours.  I've purchased on eBay a "model A or B" apron, and a "9 or 10K crossfeed screw" (with the gear that my 9C screw lacks).  So I think the only thing I also need is a new leadscrew.  Will a 9A (quick-change gearbox) leadscrew work, or do I need a 9B?

Thanks!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Jim_B
 

The B requires the drive slot, which the C doesn’t have. 

-8
Jim B,

On Nov 29, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:


I don't understand why you need to change the leadscrew

B to A yes, but from C to B, I don't see why


On Sun, Nov 29, 2020 at 8:37 AM john kling via groups.io <jkling222=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
For a given bed length the 9a lead screw is shorter than the 9b - the gear box takes up some space. I have seen  people adapt the 9a lead screw to a b set up by turning  fill in shaft for the tail stock end.

On Sunday, March 29, 2020, 9:31:45 PM EDT, Mark Moulding <mark@...> wrote:


(My first post here - be kind!)

I'm sure this topic has been beaten to death, but I'm still a bit fuzzy on one point.  I'm attempting up upgrade my SB 9" model 'C' to a 'B'.  The lathe is in very good shape - a bit dirt from disuse, but no real rust, and very low hours.  I've purchased on eBay a "model A or B" apron, and a "9 or 10K crossfeed screw" (with the gear that my 9C screw lacks).  So I think the only thing I also need is a new leadscrew.  Will a 9A (quick-change gearbox) leadscrew work, or do I need a 9B?

Thanks!
~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


--
Jim B


Louis
 

You should be able to cut the keyway on your benchtop with no issues. it's just a matter of care and attention to details. The cut needs to be straight and parallel with the lead screw centerline.  It should be sized for the key in the apron and the depth relates to the same. On my older Series N 9" the keyway measures at 0.200" but yours might be different. Use your apron measurements to size it.

Here's a couple of options.

First you could cut it with a end mill sized correctly for the key slot. This cut would be on the top center of the lead screw which would need to be mounted parallel to the table movement in the X direction and level with the table. An indicator mounted on the spindle should give you both. It's critical to get the X parallel since otherwise the keyway will not be parallel to the centerline of the leadscrew. if you get the level out a bit all you get is a slightly deeper key slot at some locations which shouldn't make much difference. For this option I would probably mount the lead screw in a couple of vises to maximize the length of supported cut but one vise would work. It would only take longer. I wouldn't worry about holding the sides of the lead screw directly in the vise since the forces for this small of a cut won't be an issue. I would also set a couple of fixed 1-2-3 blocks or similar stops against the lead screw at each end so I can use the same X alignment each time. 

The second option is to mount a horizontal cutter (again sized for the slot) on a stub arbor in your mill. Then cut the slot on the side of the leadscrew making sure your cut is again centered on the screw. For this option I would likely mount the lead screw on several equal thickness spacers just above the table and clamp it down on the top at several locations. Just make sure your clamps are all on the same side so you maximize the length of cut and use soft shims to protect the lead screw. For this approach I would also clamp similar stops against the one side of the lead screw once I have it aligned. Then when you are ready to slide it over for the next section just make sure it is against those stops so you don't have to repeat the alignment. 

For both of these methods you will need some way to make sure you keep the lead screw at the same rotation as you slide it along for the next cut. I tend to use stops for that sort of thing so I would probably make up a piece of steel at the key slot cut width and mount it when the first section is cut in such a way that as the next section is mounted, it can use it in the newly cut slot for alignment. 
 
Not sure if your lead screw is hardened but my older Model N 9" isn't. So HSS or carbide end mills would both work. Just be careful with the cutting speed and feed since it's an interrupted cut and it's pretty easy to snap those small end mills. Using the horizontal cutter method eliminates that worry.

Good luck,

Louis


William Santo
 

You have to mill a keyway into the "C" leadscrew from one end to the other in order to drive the worm gear in the apron.....Then you'll have to straighten the leadscrew...it will bow. Bill

On Sunday, November 29, 2020, 05:19:51 PM EST, Louis via groups.io <l_schoolkate@...> wrote:


You should be able to cut the keyway on your benchtop with no issues. it's just a matter of care and attention to details. The cut needs to be straight and parallel with the lead screw centerline.  It should be sized for the key in the apron and the depth relates to the same. On my older Series N 9" the keyway measures at 0.200" but yours might be different. Use your apron measurements to size it.

Here's a couple of options.

First you could cut it with a end mill sized correctly for the key slot. This cut would be on the top center of the lead screw which would need to be mounted parallel to the table movement in the X direction and level with the table. An indicator mounted on the spindle should give you both. It's critical to get the X parallel since otherwise the keyway will not be parallel to the centerline of the leadscrew. if you get the level out a bit all you get is a slightly deeper key slot at some locations which shouldn't make much difference. For this option I would probably mount the lead screw in a couple of vises to maximize the length of supported cut but one vise would work. It would only take longer. I wouldn't worry about holding the sides of the lead screw directly in the vise since the forces for this small of a cut won't be an issue. I would also set a couple of fixed 1-2-3 blocks or similar stops against the lead screw at each end so I can use the same X alignment each time. 

The second option is to mount a horizontal cutter (again sized for the slot) on a stub arbor in your mill. Then cut the slot on the side of the leadscrew making sure your cut is again centered on the screw. For this option I would likely mount the lead screw on several equal thickness spacers just above the table and clamp it down on the top at several locations. Just make sure your clamps are all on the same side so you maximize the length of cut and use soft shims to protect the lead screw. For this approach I would also clamp similar stops against the one side of the lead screw once I have it aligned. Then when you are ready to slide it over for the next section just make sure it is against those stops so you don't have to repeat the alignment. 

For both of these methods you will need some way to make sure you keep the lead screw at the same rotation as you slide it along for the next cut. I tend to use stops for that sort of thing so I would probably make up a piece of steel at the key slot cut width and mount it when the first section is cut in such a way that as the next section is mounted, it can use it in the newly cut slot for alignment. 
 
Not sure if your lead screw is hardened but my older Model N 9" isn't. So HSS or carbide end mills would both work. Just be careful with the cutting speed and feed since it's an interrupted cut and it's pretty easy to snap those small end mills. Using the horizontal cutter method eliminates that worry.

Good luck,

Louis


Richard
 

I thought the question was about using an 'A' leadscrew to convert a model 'C' to a model 'B'   If so, an ''A' leadscrew is shorter than a 'B' or a 'C'.  As outlined in the text below, a 'C' leadscrew which is already the right fit, can have a square channel milled into it to make it function as a 'B' leadscrew.

Fair winds and following seas,

Richard


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of William Santo <valleyfarmisee@...>
Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2020 6:45 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Will a 9-A leadscrew work for a 9-C to 9-B conversion (no quickchange)?
 
You have to mill a keyway into the "C" leadscrew from one end to the other in order to drive the worm gear in the apron.....Then you'll have to straighten the leadscrew...it will bow. Bill

On Sunday, November 29, 2020, 05:19:51 PM EST, Louis via groups.io <l_schoolkate@...> wrote:


You should be able to cut the keyway on your benchtop with no issues. it's just a matter of care and attention to details. The cut needs to be straight and parallel with the lead screw centerline.  It should be sized for the key in the apron and the depth relates to the same. On my older Series N 9" the keyway measures at 0.200" but yours might be different. Use your apron measurements to size it.

Here's a couple of options.

First you could cut it with a end mill sized correctly for the key slot. This cut would be on the top center of the lead screw which would need to be mounted parallel to the table movement in the X direction and level with the table. An indicator mounted on the spindle should give you both. It's critical to get the X parallel since otherwise the keyway will not be parallel to the centerline of the leadscrew. if you get the level out a bit all you get is a slightly deeper key slot at some locations which shouldn't make much difference. For this option I would probably mount the lead screw in a couple of vises to maximize the length of supported cut but one vise would work. It would only take longer. I wouldn't worry about holding the sides of the lead screw directly in the vise since the forces for this small of a cut won't be an issue. I would also set a couple of fixed 1-2-3 blocks or similar stops against the lead screw at each end so I can use the same X alignment each time. 

The second option is to mount a horizontal cutter (again sized for the slot) on a stub arbor in your mill. Then cut the slot on the side of the leadscrew making sure your cut is again centered on the screw. For this option I would likely mount the lead screw on several equal thickness spacers just above the table and clamp it down on the top at several locations. Just make sure your clamps are all on the same side so you maximize the length of cut and use soft shims to protect the lead screw. For this approach I would also clamp similar stops against the one side of the lead screw once I have it aligned. Then when you are ready to slide it over for the next section just make sure it is against those stops so you don't have to repeat the alignment. 

For both of these methods you will need some way to make sure you keep the lead screw at the same rotation as you slide it along for the next cut. I tend to use stops for that sort of thing so I would probably make up a piece of steel at the key slot cut width and mount it when the first section is cut in such a way that as the next section is mounted, it can use it in the newly cut slot for alignment. 
 
Not sure if your lead screw is hardened but my older Model N 9" isn't. So HSS or carbide end mills would both work. Just be careful with the cutting speed and feed since it's an interrupted cut and it's pretty easy to snap those small end mills. Using the horizontal cutter method eliminates that worry.

Good luck,

Louis


Stuart Wilby
 

I have used a lead screw off a 36 inch SB 9B which w
became available, it was too short for the 42 inch bed, so I made a steel extension pinned it with taper pins in 2 places, extended the slot on the Miller to accommodate the traverse section of the apron, I haven’t made the thread yet and probably won’t bother seeing as most the work is done near the chuck, but there’s enough threade lead screw to do most jobs, bingo, I looked for a 42inch lead screw for a SB 9B, still looking, but not desperate now.


popeyetokar@att.net
 

Stuart,  check out McMaster Carr, they sell Acme thread stock.  They handle different sizes, as well as both left and right hand thread. Hopes this
helps.

On Friday, December 18, 2020, 10:17:21 AM EST, Stuart Wilby via groups.io <stuartawilby@...> wrote:


I have used a lead screw off a 36 inch SB 9B which w
became available, it was too short for the 42 inch bed, so I made a steel extension pinned it with taper pins in 2 places, extended the slot on the Miller to accommodate the traverse section of the apron, I haven’t made the thread yet and probably won’t bother seeing as most the work is done near the chuck, but there’s enough threade lead screw to do most jobs, bingo, I looked for a 42inch lead screw for a SB 9B, still looking, but not desperate now.


Stuart Wilby
 

Thank you, however, McMaster Carr do not supply to the UK, there is no franchise visible for their catalogue of components, maybe after leaving the EU the WTO will allow a better tariff and reasonable shipping, this company would do well in the UK, we are a resourceful nation, we invent things, we repair things, we need you here, we have suppliers who are first rate, ie, simply bearings, but not on the scale of the aforementioned in the USA.