Switch Smoke


Ondrej Krejci
 

Greetings,

I should like to know, out of curiosity, how many people run their machine tools on direct current or with universal motors as opposed to the general norm of alternating current and induction motors.

OK

On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 12:15:31 PM EDT, ART <twocan90@...> wrote:


Greg:

I decided to go back and check my repair to the smoking switch, and I found the real problem. 

The connection between the "tab" where the output wire from the switch connects to the motor was a riveted connection that worked loose over time.  This loose connection generated heat which heated the wire and weakened the insulation on that wire causing a short to the ground wire which was touching it in the small space of the switch housing.

Hope that helps.

Capt. Art

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: ART <twocan90@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <southbendlathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:44:02 PM EDT
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

Greg:

Carefully check for frayed or broken insulation on the wires that feed the switch.

I just had this exact same thing happen on my drill press.  Upon opening the switch cover, I found the positive input wire rubbing against the ground wire.  This is also the original switch, probably 20+ years old.

In any case I insulated the broken insulation and the problem was fixed.

You should also make sure that the jumper wire is the same size as the rest of the wiring.

Capt. Art


On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:31:30 PM EDT, Glen Ruch via groups.io <gw.ruch@...> wrote:


Perhaps the Motor Wiring Diagrams would be of use:

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP1.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP2.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/Furnas%20Drum%20Switch/DRUMSW~1.jpg

Regards.

On 8/31/21 3:20 PM, Glen Ruch via groups.io wrote:

Depending on the connection, it is possible the circuit is running thru the motor commutator thru the motor coil back thru the commutator to the drum switch.  The motor winding could be read as a short circuit depending on how the Ohm meter is set.

On 8/31/21 12:37 PM, G K via groups.io wrote:
When checking continuity with my voltmeter, I am showing a closed circuit between T1, T3, and T2, T4.  Is this expected, or is there an issue within the motor?



On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 08:43:13 AM CDT, Ray De Jong via groups.io <dejongray@...> wrote:


The Jumper terminal screws may have been a bit loose and arcing occurred and the resulting heat build up probably fried the wire. I have replaced many receptacles that fried not only the lead-in conductor but also the inside of the outlet, all from contacts losing their tension an/or a loose connection

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 6:34:26 PM PDT, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Working on the SB9 tonight, and smelled a little burn.  Flipped the switch off. looked around and saw no issues.  Flipped it back on and pop goes the breaker, and smoke from the switch.  I believe the switch is the original (1942) drum switch.  Unplugged it, and took the cover off the switch, and the jumper was fried.  No idea why.  I'm not an electrician, but can use a voltmeter.  Suggested troubleshoot? 

120 volt circuit. Furmas R44, 6-terminal switch, Dayton 3/4 hp motor.

I'm planning on pulling it apart tomorrow and look for any additional burned wires, but I do not believe I will find any from a cursory look.  Then I'll wire a receptacle directly onto the motor to see if there are any issues there.  If were good there, I will re-wire the switch and see what happens.  Maybe some chips got inside and caused a short.  Not sure.  Any chance capacitor went back and caused the short?  The only burn smell is in the proximity of the switch, but that could be where the smallest gauge wire (jumper) is located.

Thanks,

Greg


RJ White
 

I am still on direct currant 


On Sep 1, 2021, at 12:24 PM, Ondrej Krejci via groups.io <okrejci@...> wrote:


Greetings,

I should like to know, out of curiosity, how many people run their machine tools on direct current or with universal motors as opposed to the general norm of alternating current and induction motors.

OK

On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 12:15:31 PM EDT, ART <twocan90@...> wrote:


Greg:

I decided to go back and check my repair to the smoking switch, and I found the real problem. 

The connection between the "tab" where the output wire from the switch connects to the motor was a riveted connection that worked loose over time.  This loose connection generated heat which heated the wire and weakened the insulation on that wire causing a short to the ground wire which was touching it in the small space of the switch housing.

Hope that helps.

Capt. Art

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: ART <twocan90@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <southbendlathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:44:02 PM EDT
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

Greg:

Carefully check for frayed or broken insulation on the wires that feed the switch.

I just had this exact same thing happen on my drill press.  Upon opening the switch cover, I found the positive input wire rubbing against the ground wire.  This is also the original switch, probably 20+ years old.

In any case I insulated the broken insulation and the problem was fixed.

You should also make sure that the jumper wire is the same size as the rest of the wiring.

Capt. Art


On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:31:30 PM EDT, Glen Ruch via groups.io <gw.ruch@...> wrote:


Perhaps the Motor Wiring Diagrams would be of use:

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP1.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP2.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/Furnas%20Drum%20Switch/DRUMSW~1.jpg

Regards.

On 8/31/21 3:20 PM, Glen Ruch via groups.io wrote:

Depending on the connection, it is possible the circuit is running thru the motor commutator thru the motor coil back thru the commutator to the drum switch.  The motor winding could be read as a short circuit depending on how the Ohm meter is set.

On 8/31/21 12:37 PM, G K via groups.io wrote:
When checking continuity with my voltmeter, I am showing a closed circuit between T1, T3, and T2, T4.  Is this expected, or is there an issue within the motor?



On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 08:43:13 AM CDT, Ray De Jong via groups.io <dejongray@...> wrote:


The Jumper terminal screws may have been a bit loose and arcing occurred and the resulting heat build up probably fried the wire. I have replaced many receptacles that fried not only the lead-in conductor but also the inside of the outlet, all from contacts losing their tension an/or a loose connection

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 6:34:26 PM PDT, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Working on the SB9 tonight, and smelled a little burn.  Flipped the switch off. looked around and saw no issues.  Flipped it back on and pop goes the breaker, and smoke from the switch.  I believe the switch is the original (1942) drum switch.  Unplugged it, and took the cover off the switch, and the jumper was fried.  No idea why.  I'm not an electrician, but can use a voltmeter.  Suggested troubleshoot? 

120 volt circuit. Furmas R44, 6-terminal switch, Dayton 3/4 hp motor.

I'm planning on pulling it apart tomorrow and look for any additional burned wires, but I do not believe I will find any from a cursory look.  Then I'll wire a receptacle directly onto the motor to see if there are any issues there.  If were good there, I will re-wire the switch and see what happens.  Maybe some chips got inside and caused a short.  Not sure.  Any chance capacitor went back and caused the short?  The only burn smell is in the proximity of the switch, but that could be where the smallest gauge wire (jumper) is located.

Thanks,

Greg


Ondrej Krejci
 

You have a motor-generator set or windmill with batteries?


wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Wed, Sep 1, 2021 at 03:20 PM, RJ White wrote:
I am still on direct currant 
I like currant jelly directly on my toast.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


G K
 

I have a SB9C that runs on a single phase, 3/4hp, AC, 120+/- volt motor.

Please school me on the advantage and process of going DC.

Greg






On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 02:24:31 PM CDT, Ondrej Krejci via groups.io <okrejci@...> wrote:


Greetings,

I should like to know, out of curiosity, how many people run their machine tools on direct current or with universal motors as opposed to the general norm of alternating current and induction motors.

OK

On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 12:15:31 PM EDT, ART <twocan90@...> wrote:


Greg:

I decided to go back and check my repair to the smoking switch, and I found the real problem. 

The connection between the "tab" where the output wire from the switch connects to the motor was a riveted connection that worked loose over time.  This loose connection generated heat which heated the wire and weakened the insulation on that wire causing a short to the ground wire which was touching it in the small space of the switch housing.

Hope that helps.

Capt. Art

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: ART <twocan90@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <southbendlathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:44:02 PM EDT
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

Greg:

Carefully check for frayed or broken insulation on the wires that feed the switch.

I just had this exact same thing happen on my drill press.  Upon opening the switch cover, I found the positive input wire rubbing against the ground wire.  This is also the original switch, probably 20+ years old.

In any case I insulated the broken insulation and the problem was fixed.

You should also make sure that the jumper wire is the same size as the rest of the wiring.

Capt. Art


On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:31:30 PM EDT, Glen Ruch via groups.io <gw.ruch@...> wrote:


Perhaps the Motor Wiring Diagrams would be of use:

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP1.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP2.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/Furnas%20Drum%20Switch/DRUMSW~1.jpg

Regards.

On 8/31/21 3:20 PM, Glen Ruch via groups.io wrote:

Depending on the connection, it is possible the circuit is running thru the motor commutator thru the motor coil back thru the commutator to the drum switch.  The motor winding could be read as a short circuit depending on how the Ohm meter is set.

On 8/31/21 12:37 PM, G K via groups.io wrote:
When checking continuity with my voltmeter, I am showing a closed circuit between T1, T3, and T2, T4.  Is this expected, or is there an issue within the motor?



On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 08:43:13 AM CDT, Ray De Jong via groups.io <dejongray@...> wrote:


The Jumper terminal screws may have been a bit loose and arcing occurred and the resulting heat build up probably fried the wire. I have replaced many receptacles that fried not only the lead-in conductor but also the inside of the outlet, all from contacts losing their tension an/or a loose connection

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 6:34:26 PM PDT, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Working on the SB9 tonight, and smelled a little burn.  Flipped the switch off. looked around and saw no issues.  Flipped it back on and pop goes the breaker, and smoke from the switch.  I believe the switch is the original (1942) drum switch.  Unplugged it, and took the cover off the switch, and the jumper was fried.  No idea why.  I'm not an electrician, but can use a voltmeter.  Suggested troubleshoot? 

120 volt circuit. Furmas R44, 6-terminal switch, Dayton 3/4 hp motor.

I'm planning on pulling it apart tomorrow and look for any additional burned wires, but I do not believe I will find any from a cursory look.  Then I'll wire a receptacle directly onto the motor to see if there are any issues there.  If were good there, I will re-wire the switch and see what happens.  Maybe some chips got inside and caused a short.  Not sure.  Any chance capacitor went back and caused the short?  The only burn smell is in the proximity of the switch, but that could be where the smallest gauge wire (jumper) is located.

Thanks,

Greg


Jim_B
 

The usual conversion is to find an old thread mill motor, and purchase a driver/power supply/controller for it. 
If the thread motor still functions, you might be able to use it. 

The DC conversion gives you a variable speed motor drive. 

You can get (almost) the same advantage from going to a 3 phase motor with a VFD. 

I do believe the DC motor might give you a wider speed range. 

Either conversion maintains the same motor torque, independent of speed, but the HP decreases with motor speed. 

Basically you will need to change belts less often. 



On Sep 7, 2021, at 12:29 PM, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:

I have a SB9C that runs on a single phase, 3/4hp, AC, 120+/- volt motor.

Please school me on the advantage and process of going DC.

Greg






--
Jim B


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 


Jim means Tread Mill, one of those exercise machines, not a device for high speed screw thread forming! Presumably a predactive toxt errur.


Eddie



------ Original Message ------
From: "Jim_B" <jim@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 7 Sep, 21 At 19:56
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

The usual conversion is to find an old thread mill motor, and purchase a driver/power supply/controller for it.
If the thread motor still functions, you might be able to use it.

The DC conversion gives you a variable speed motor drive.

You can get (almost) the same advantage from going to a 3 phase motor with a VFD.

I do believe the DC motor might give you a wider speed range.

Either conversion maintains the same motor torque, independent of speed, but the HP decreases with motor speed.

Basically you will need to change belts less often.



On Sep 7, 2021, at 12:29 PM, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:

I have a SB9C that runs on a single phase, 3/4hp, AC, 120+/- volt motor.

Please school me on the advantage and process of going DC.

Greg






--
Jim B


Jim_B
 

Yes, thanks 


Jim B,

On Sep 7, 2021, at 3:49 PM, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:



Jim means Tread Mill, one of those exercise machines, not a device for high speed screw thread forming! Presumably a predactive toxt errur.


Eddie



------ Original Message ------
From: "Jim_B" <jim@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 7 Sep, 21 At 19:56
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

The usual conversion is to find an old thread mill motor, and purchase a driver/power supply/controller for it.
If the thread motor still functions, you might be able to use it.

The DC conversion gives you a variable speed motor drive.

You can get (almost) the same advantage from going to a 3 phase motor with a VFD.

I do believe the DC motor might give you a wider speed range.

Either conversion maintains the same motor torque, independent of speed, but the HP decreases with motor speed.

Basically you will need to change belts less often.



On Sep 7, 2021, at 12:29 PM, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:

I have a SB9C that runs on a single phase, 3/4hp, AC, 120+/- volt motor.

Please school me on the advantage and process of going DC.

Greg






--
Jim B

--
Jim B


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Greg, you don't say what type of motor that is. It could easily be either an induction motor or universal (i.e. either DC or AC) type with brushes. Anything post WW 2 is not likely to be the latter, I suspect.


You get 6 speeds with your standard setup. How many more do you need? You probably shouldn't aim for much faster without a headstock bearing redesign.


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "G K via groups.io" <bug_hunter2000@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 7 Sep, 21 At 17:29
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

I have a SB9C that runs on a single phase, 3/4hp, AC, 120+/- volt motor.

Please school me on the advantage and process of going DC.

Greg






On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 02:24:31 PM CDT, Ondrej Krejci via groups.io <okrejci@...> wrote:


Greetings,

I should like to know, out of curiosity, how many people run their machine tools on direct current or with universal motors as opposed to the general norm of alternating current and induction motors.

OK

On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 12:15:31 PM EDT, ART <twocan90@...> wrote:


Greg:

I decided to go back and check my repair to the smoking switch, and I found the real problem.

The connection between the "tab" where the output wire from the switch connects to the motor was a riveted connection that worked loose over time. This loose connection generated heat which heated the wire and weakened the insulation on that wire causing a short to the ground wire which was touching it in the small space of the switch housing.

Hope that helps.

Capt. Art

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: ART <twocan90@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <southbendlathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:44:02 PM EDT
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

Greg:

Carefully check for frayed or broken insulation on the wires that feed the switch.

I just had this exact same thing happen on my drill press. Upon opening the switch cover, I found the positive input wire rubbing against the ground wire. This is also the original switch, probably 20+ years old.

In any case I insulated the broken insulation and the problem was fixed.

You should also make sure that the jumper wire is the same size as the rest of the wiring.

Capt. Art


On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:31:30 PM EDT, Glen Ruch via groups.io <gw.ruch@...> wrote:


Perhaps the Motor Wiring Diagrams would be of use:

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP1.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP2.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/Furnas%20Drum%20Switch/DRUMSW~1.jpg

Regards.

On 8/31/21 3:20 PM, Glen Ruch via groups.io wrote:

Depending on the connection, it is possible the circuit is running thru the motor commutator thru the motor coil back thru the commutator to the drum switch. The motor winding could be read as a short circuit depending on how the Ohm meter is set.

On 8/31/21 12:37 PM, G K via groups.io wrote:
When checking continuity with my voltmeter, I am showing a closed circuit between T1, T3, and T2, T4. Is this expected, or is there an issue within the motor?



On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 08:43:13 AM CDT, Ray De Jong via groups.io <dejongray@...> wrote:


The Jumper terminal screws may have been a bit loose and arcing occurred and the resulting heat build up probably fried the wire. I have replaced many receptacles that fried not only the lead-in conductor but also the inside of the outlet, all from contacts losing their tension an/or a loose connection

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 6:34:26 PM PDT, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Working on the SB9 tonight, and smelled a little burn. Flipped the switch off. looked around and saw no issues. Flipped it back on and pop goes the breaker, and smoke from the switch. I believe the switch is the original (1942) drum switch. Unplugged it, and took the cover off the switch, and the jumper was fried. No idea why. I'm not an electrician, but can use a voltmeter. Suggested troubleshoot?

120 volt circuit. Furmas R44, 6-terminal switch, Dayton 3/4 hp motor.

I'm planning on pulling it apart tomorrow and look for any additional burned wires, but I do not believe I will find any from a cursory look. Then I'll wire a receptacle directly onto the motor to see if there are any issues there. If were good there, I will re-wire the switch and see what happens. Maybe some chips got inside and caused a short. Not sure. Any chance capacitor went back and caused the short? The only burn smell is in the proximity of the switch, but that could be where the smallest gauge wire (jumper) is located.

Thanks,

Greg


G K
 

It is a Dayton motor.  Not original.  I am unsure if it is an induction or universal or other.  Currently I am set up for 9 speeds.  Really do not need more, just a random thought.  It would be nice if it were a bit quieter, but I am not sure that is obtained from a DC motor.  I haven't had the machine for too long thus far, and never had to switch to the high-speed wheel on the counter-shaft.  Just for my edification, are DC motors rated in hp, similar to an AC motor? 

Greg

On Tuesday, September 7, 2021, 03:23:20 PM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


Greg, you don't say what type of motor that is. It could easily be either an induction motor or universal (i.e. either DC or AC) type with brushes. Anything post WW 2 is not likely to be the latter, I suspect.


You get 6 speeds with your standard setup. How many more do you need? You probably shouldn't aim for much faster without a headstock bearing redesign.


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "G K via groups.io" <bug_hunter2000@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 7 Sep, 21 At 17:29
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

I have a SB9C that runs on a single phase, 3/4hp, AC, 120+/- volt motor.

Please school me on the advantage and process of going DC.

Greg






On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 02:24:31 PM CDT, Ondrej Krejci via groups.io <okrejci@...> wrote:


Greetings,

I should like to know, out of curiosity, how many people run their machine tools on direct current or with universal motors as opposed to the general norm of alternating current and induction motors.

OK

On Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 12:15:31 PM EDT, ART <twocan90@...> wrote:


Greg:

I decided to go back and check my repair to the smoking switch, and I found the real problem.

The connection between the "tab" where the output wire from the switch connects to the motor was a riveted connection that worked loose over time. This loose connection generated heat which heated the wire and weakened the insulation on that wire causing a short to the ground wire which was touching it in the small space of the switch housing.

Hope that helps.

Capt. Art

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: ART <twocan90@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <southbendlathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:44:02 PM EDT
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Switch Smoke

Greg:

Carefully check for frayed or broken insulation on the wires that feed the switch.

I just had this exact same thing happen on my drill press. Upon opening the switch cover, I found the positive input wire rubbing against the ground wire. This is also the original switch, probably 20+ years old.

In any case I insulated the broken insulation and the problem was fixed.

You should also make sure that the jumper wire is the same size as the rest of the wiring.

Capt. Art


On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 04:31:30 PM EDT, Glen Ruch via groups.io <gw.ruch@...> wrote:


Perhaps the Motor Wiring Diagrams would be of use:

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP1.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/SBL_MotorWiringP2.jpg

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/Motors-Switches/Furnas%20Drum%20Switch/DRUMSW~1.jpg

Regards.

On 8/31/21 3:20 PM, Glen Ruch via groups.io wrote:

Depending on the connection, it is possible the circuit is running thru the motor commutator thru the motor coil back thru the commutator to the drum switch. The motor winding could be read as a short circuit depending on how the Ohm meter is set.

On 8/31/21 12:37 PM, G K via groups.io wrote:
When checking continuity with my voltmeter, I am showing a closed circuit between T1, T3, and T2, T4. Is this expected, or is there an issue within the motor?



On Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 08:43:13 AM CDT, Ray De Jong via groups.io <dejongray@...> wrote:


The Jumper terminal screws may have been a bit loose and arcing occurred and the resulting heat build up probably fried the wire. I have replaced many receptacles that fried not only the lead-in conductor but also the inside of the outlet, all from contacts losing their tension an/or a loose connection

On Monday, August 30, 2021, 6:34:26 PM PDT, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Working on the SB9 tonight, and smelled a little burn. Flipped the switch off. looked around and saw no issues. Flipped it back on and pop goes the breaker, and smoke from the switch. I believe the switch is the original (1942) drum switch. Unplugged it, and took the cover off the switch, and the jumper was fried. No idea why. I'm not an electrician, but can use a voltmeter. Suggested troubleshoot?

120 volt circuit. Furmas R44, 6-terminal switch, Dayton 3/4 hp motor.

I'm planning on pulling it apart tomorrow and look for any additional burned wires, but I do not believe I will find any from a cursory look. Then I'll wire a receptacle directly onto the motor to see if there are any issues there. If were good there, I will re-wire the switch and see what happens. Maybe some chips got inside and caused a short. Not sure. Any chance capacitor went back and caused the short? The only burn smell is in the proximity of the switch, but that could be where the smallest gauge wire (jumper) is located.

Thanks,

Greg


Jim_B
 

Quote"

On Sep 7, 2021, at 5:53 PM, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:

Just for my edification, are DC motors rated in hp, similar to an AC motor? 
End Quote
Yes, HP 
BUT seems as the new SI way is to rate them, Motors, in Watts. (1 HP = 750 (metric) Watts)

Jim B.





--
Jim B


Richard Wanke
 

I presently have an old tread mill I am planning on getting rid of. What would I need to do this conversion on my South Bend 9c?


mike allen
 

        you want to keep the motor , the control board , the feedback sensor which should be a 2 wire device that reads a magnet on the pulley that the motor drives . Some of them have  big ole choke , kinda looks like a transformer. You might find some other parts that may be usable for some other things .  All the ones that I've tore down were  made of some pretty stout square metal tubing . If it has a slide control you might keep that for testing . Pull all the cables,harness's that you can & try to do it without screwing them up , they may be needed for the conversion . On all of the ones I have done

the flywheel is a left hand thread , 12x13 LH . You will want to keep the flywheel .

animal

On 9/7/2021 5:05 PM, Richard Wanke wrote:
I presently have an old tread mill I am planning on getting rid of. What would I need to do this conversion on my South Bend 9c?


Joe
 

At 3/4 HP it is almost certain to be a single phase capacitor start or repulsion induction motor depending on age. 3 phase motor with a VFD would nowadays be a simpler conversion if you want more variable speeds but with the counter shaft and multiple speed set up you have there's little advantage to convert. It is true 3 phase motors are more reliable, but adding a VFD cancels that advantage. DC servo motors with controllers are probably about the same or lesser in reliability as the 3 phase with VFD and more expensive if you get the type for machinery.

Joe


comstock_friend
 
Edited

I run my 13" South Bend, Bridgeport J Head vertical mill and Diamond B12 horizontal at home on an RPC (Rotary Phase Converter) (240 volt single phase in, 240 volt 3 phase out). At the vacation house the Diamond 22M horizontal is run on 240 V 3 phase via an Emerson VFD, 240 VAC single phase in. The Rusnok Model 70 vertical has a Leeson brushed 190 VDC motor running on a Leeson variable speed controller with 240 VAC, single phase input.

They all run fine and are happy...

The Tormach PCNC 1100 takes 240 and 120 volt single phase in and takes care of itself getting the correct voltage to all its motors.

John