Topics

South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue

carbure2003
 

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git. Tonight I decided to dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from under. As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror. I recall seeing a post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too deep). I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug the hole in the previous posting. My initial approach is to plug it with epoxy. Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same type. Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc

m. allan noah
 

I would drill, tap, and install a short setscrew, coated in RTV.

allan

On Wed, Feb 19, 2020 at 10:48 PM carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git. Tonight I decided to dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from under. As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror. I recall seeing a post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too deep). I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug the hole in the previous posting. My initial approach is to plug it with epoxy. Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same type. Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"

ww_big_al
 

I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.

For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
carbure2003
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git. Tonight I decided to
dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
under. As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror. I recall seeing a
post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
deep). I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
the hole in the previous posting. My initial approach is to plug it with
epoxy. Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
type. Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

I find acetone to be a very effective degreaser.  In the UK, Boots the chemist sell it in small (50ml) bottles, but it can be obtained in larger qtys on line.  Its common use is as nail varnish remover.

Eddie

On Thursday, 20 February 2020, 12:34:17 GMT, ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:


I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.

For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.



-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
carbure2003
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git.  Tonight I decided to
dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
under.  As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror.  I recall seeing a
post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
deep).  I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
the hole in the previous posting.  My initial approach is to plug it with
epoxy.  Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
type.  Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc







wlw19958
 

Hi There,

I think it was my post you are remembering.  I had one of the last 10K's
made by South Bend Lathe when they were getting their castings from
S. Korea.  Mine also would loose oil from the rear (i.e. left) bearing.

I disassembled the headstock and cleaned the oil wick well with Brakekleen®
followed with lacquer thinner.  I used JB Weld to seal the hole by taking
a small (pea sized) blob on the end of a craft stick (think popsicle stick). 
Then I used a heat gun to liquefy the epoxy while holding the blob over
the well so that it would drip off the stick and down into the well.  One
good drip was enough to seal it.  Warming the casting helped the epoxy
to flow into the hole and speed up the setting of the epoxy.

I should mention that I placed a piece of masking tape inside the tumbler
pivot hole in the head casting to keep the epoxy from leaking out before
it sets.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

carbure2003
 

AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt . There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw. Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.

Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
I will try JB weld as filler. I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench. I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.

Guy Cadrin

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "ww_big_al" <@yahoo.net>
To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500

I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.

For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.

IL

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
carbure2003
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git. Tonight I decided to
dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
under. As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror. I recall seeing a
post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
deep). I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
the hole in the previous posting. My initial approach is to plug it with
epoxy. Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
type. Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc

Andrei
 

Guy,

make sure that the casting has had plenty of opportunity to warm up. I would take it into the house overnight just to avoid over-stressing the metal with a torch or a heat gun when you apply the JB weld.

Andrei

On 2/20/2020 6:36 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt . There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw. Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.

Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
I will try JB weld as filler. I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench. I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.

Guy Cadrin

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "ww_big_al" <@yahoo.net>
To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500

I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.

For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.

IL

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
carbure2003
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git. Tonight I decided to
dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
under. As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror. I recall seeing a
post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
deep). I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
the hole in the previous posting. My initial approach is to plug it with
epoxy. Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
type. Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc







carbure2003
 

THanks about the tip about heating epoxy glue.
 
your assessment of a pea size blob corresponds to the maximum volume I was planning on using in this hole.
 
I will use dental hygienist tools as well.
 
I keep the group posted.
 
Guy Cadrin


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "wlw19958" <wlw-19958@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 10:05:15 -0800

Hi There,

I think it was my post you are remembering.  I had one of the last 10K's
made by South Bend Lathe when they were getting their castings from
S. Korea.  Mine also would loose oil from the rear (i.e. left) bearing.

I disassembled the headstock and cleaned the oil wick well with Brakekleen®
followed with lacquer thinner.  I used JB Weld to seal the hole by taking
a small (pea sized) blob on the end of a craft stick (think popsicle stick). 
Then I used a heat gun to liquefy the epoxy while holding the blob over
the well so that it would drip off the stick and down into the well.  One
good drip was enough to seal it.  Warming the casting helped the epoxy
to flow into the hole and speed up the setting of the epoxy.

I should mention that I placed a piece of masking tape inside the tumbler
pivot hole in the head casting to keep the epoxy from leaking out before
it sets.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb



____________________________________________________________
Urologist Is Shocked That This Has "Fixed" ED
Med Journal
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3242/5e4f1abbb327a1abb22a1st04vuc
SponsoredBy Content.Ad

mike allen
 

be real careful with heat & brake cleaner I know that if ya use it to clean a spot yer gonna weld , it will probably be the last thing ya do

        animal

On 2/20/2020 3:36 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt . There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw. Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.

Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
I will try JB weld as filler. I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench. I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.

Guy Cadrin

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "ww_big_al" <@yahoo.net>
To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500

I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.

For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.

IL

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
carbure2003
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue

I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
bearing.

Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git. Tonight I decided to
dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
under. As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.

I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror. I recall seeing a
post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
deep). I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
the hole in the previous posting. My initial approach is to plug it with
epoxy. Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.

De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
type. Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
this hole for preparation for patching?

For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)

Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
dealer.)

Guy Cadrin
Near Ottawa
____________________________________________________________
She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
removethewrinkles.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc








eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Ordinarily, I would say that any used casting that is to be welded or (e.g.) lined with white metal should first be raised to a temperature that will evaporate and burn off all the oil that is contained within porosity, cavities, cracks etc.  I have used an outdoor wood fire to provide the necessary gentle and even heat on a number of occasions, allowing the casting to cool in the dying fire.  That is necessary to avoid the oil bubbling into the molten metal.

But DON'T do that for any casting that requires accuracy without re-machining afterwards!  I wouldn't take a headstock casting above the boiling point of water applied evenly unless it was such an irreplacable wreck that it was going to be re-machined afterwards.  Stick with solvents.

Eddie

On Friday, 21 February 2020, 02:08:24 GMT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        be real careful with heat & brake cleaner I know that if ya use
it to clean a spot yer gonna weld , it will probably be the last thing
ya do

        animal

On 2/20/2020 3:36 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
> AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt .  There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw.  Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
> I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.
>
> Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
> Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
> I will try JB weld as filler.  I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench.  I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.
>
> Guy Cadrin
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: "ww_big_al" <arknack@...>
> To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500
>
> I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
> claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
> not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
> s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
>
> As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
> believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
> well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
> would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
> possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.
>
> For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
> oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
> drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.
>
> IL
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
> carbure2003
> Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
>
> I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
> bearing.
>
> Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git.  Tonight I decided to
> dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
> under.  As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.
>
> I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror.  I recall seeing a
> post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
> deep).  I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
> of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
> the hole in the previous posting.  My initial approach is to plug it with
> epoxy.  Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.
>
> De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
> type.  Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
> this hole for preparation for patching?
>
> For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
> bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
> condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)
>
> Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
> gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
> missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
> dealer.)
>
> Guy Cadrin
> Near Ottawa
> ____________________________________________________________
> She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
> removethewrinkles.com
> http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




carbure2003
 

Heat will be applied only in the immediate zone where glue will be applied, far away from important machined surfaces.
casting will be drilled in order to enable the use of lever collet closer as well.
I will also drill a small hole (10-32 ) in order to mount my headstock dividing head
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io" <eddie.draper@...>
To: southbendlathe@groups.io,  <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2020 09:08:30 +0000 (UTC)

 
Ordinarily, I would say that any used casting that is to be welded or (e.g.) lined with white metal should first be raised to a temperature that will evaporate and burn off all the oil that is contained within porosity, cavities, cracks etc.  I have used an outdoor wood fire to provide the necessary gentle and even heat on a number of occasions, allowing the casting to cool in the dying fire.  That is necessary to avoid the oil bubbling into the molten metal.
 
But DON'T do that for any casting that requires accuracy without re-machining afterwards!  I wouldn't take a headstock casting above the boiling point of water applied evenly unless it was such an irreplacable wreck that it was going to be re-machined afterwards.  Stick with solvents.
 
Eddie
 
On Friday, 21 February 2020, 02:08:24 GMT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:
 
 
        be real careful with heat & brake cleaner I know that if ya use
it to clean a spot yer gonna weld , it will probably be the last thing
ya do

        animal

On 2/20/2020 3:36 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
> AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt .  There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw.  Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
> I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.
>
> Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
> Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
> I will try JB weld as filler.  I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench.  I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.
>
> Guy Cadrin
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: "ww_big_al" <arknack@...>
> To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500
>
> I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
> claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
> not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
> s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
>
> As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
> believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
> well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
> would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
> possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.
>
> For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
> oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
> drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.
>
> IL
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
> carbure2003
> Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
>
> I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
> bearing.
>
> Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git.  Tonight I decided to
> dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
> under.  As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.
>
> I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror.  I recall seeing a
> post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
> deep).  I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
> of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
> the hole in the previous posting.  My initial approach is to plug it with
> epoxy.  Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.
>
> De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
> type.  Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
> this hole for preparation for patching?
>
> For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
> bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
> condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)
>
> Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
> gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
> missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
> dealer.)
>
> Guy Cadrin
> Near Ottawa
> ____________________________________________________________
> She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
> removethewrinkles.com
> http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>






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carbure2003
 

I removed the spindle tonight. it seems that the leak is caused by a void space in the casting. The drill never went down deep enough to go through the full distance between the spindle and tumbler axis.
somebody is supposed to bring me an endoscope camera tomorrow or sunday. I want to see the inside of the hole prior to filling the hole with epoxy
 
no bearing damage. Bearings and spindle are in excellent condition.


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "carbure2003" <guycad@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2020 11:42:29 GMT

Heat will be applied only in the immediate zone where glue will be applied, far away from important machined surfaces.
casting will be drilled in order to enable the use of lever collet closer as well.
I will also drill a small hole (10-32 ) in order to mount my headstock dividing head
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io" <eddie.draper@...>
To: southbendlathe@groups.io,  <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2020 09:08:30 +0000 (UTC)

 
Ordinarily, I would say that any used casting that is to be welded or (e.g.) lined with white metal should first be raised to a temperature that will evaporate and burn off all the oil that is contained within porosity, cavities, cracks etc.  I have used an outdoor wood fire to provide the necessary gentle and even heat on a number of occasions, allowing the casting to cool in the dying fire.  That is necessary to avoid the oil bubbling into the molten metal.
 
But DON'T do that for any casting that requires accuracy without re-machining afterwards!  I wouldn't take a headstock casting above the boiling point of water applied evenly unless it was such an irreplacable wreck that it was going to be re-machined afterwards.  Stick with solvents.
 
Eddie
 
On Friday, 21 February 2020, 02:08:24 GMT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:
 
 
        be real careful with heat & brake cleaner I know that if ya use
it to clean a spot yer gonna weld , it will probably be the last thing
ya do

        animal

On 2/20/2020 3:36 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
> AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt .  There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw.  Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
> I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.
>
> Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
> Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
> I will try JB weld as filler.  I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench.  I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.
>
> Guy Cadrin
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: "ww_big_al" <arknack@...>
> To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500
>
> I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
> claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
> not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
> s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
>
> As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
> believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
> well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
> would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
> possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.
>
> For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
> oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
> drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.
>
> IL
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
> carbure2003
> Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
>
> I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
> bearing.
>
> Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git.  Tonight I decided to
> dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
> under.  As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.
>
> I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror.  I recall seeing a
> post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
> deep).  I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
> of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
> the hole in the previous posting.  My initial approach is to plug it with
> epoxy.  Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.
>
> De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
> type.  Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
> this hole for preparation for patching?
>
> For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
> bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
> condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)
>
> Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
> gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
> missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
> dealer.)
>
> Guy Cadrin
> Near Ottawa
> ____________________________________________________________
> She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
> removethewrinkles.com
> http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




 


____________________________________________________________
$4.95 CBD Oil Breakthrough Leaves Doctors Speechless
worldhealthlabs.com
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carbure2003
 

Repair completed. Headstock back together. It does not seem to leak. It held brake fluid without problem.
 
I took the opportunity to replace the belt with a serpentine belt kind of new. Belt is linked with belt clippers. Tiny clicking noise.
 
I have one more noise to track, counter shaft makes more noise than my other south bend.
there is possibly too much tension on the V belt.  
I have some adjustment to do on the VFD not providing enough power at low speed. If you convert to VFD don’t buy chiense knock off
They don’t perform as well as european or US units. On the chienese knock off, there is no option to put a remote potentiometer. Instructions did not match the VFD pin config. Very poor instructions.
 
 

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "carbure2003" <guycad@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2020 11:42:29 GMT

Heat will be applied only in the immediate zone where glue will be applied, far away from important machined surfaces.
casting will be drilled in order to enable the use of lever collet closer as well.
I will also drill a small hole (10-32 ) in order to mount my headstock dividing head
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io" <eddie.draper@...>
To: southbendlathe@groups.io,  <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2020 09:08:30 +0000 (UTC)

 
Ordinarily, I would say that any used casting that is to be welded or (e.g.) lined with white metal should first be raised to a temperature that will evaporate and burn off all the oil that is contained within porosity, cavities, cracks etc.  I have used an outdoor wood fire to provide the necessary gentle and even heat on a number of occasions, allowing the casting to cool in the dying fire.  That is necessary to avoid the oil bubbling into the molten metal.
 
But DON'T do that for any casting that requires accuracy without re-machining afterwards!  I wouldn't take a headstock casting above the boiling point of water applied evenly unless it was such an irreplacable wreck that it was going to be re-machined afterwards.  Stick with solvents.
 
Eddie
 
On Friday, 21 February 2020, 02:08:24 GMT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:
 
 
        be real careful with heat & brake cleaner I know that if ya use
it to clean a spot yer gonna weld , it will probably be the last thing
ya do

        animal

On 2/20/2020 3:36 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
> AT this point drilling and tapping is not an option. Original hole is plugged with a babbitt .  There is not enough place for tapping and screwing a small screw.  Hole has to hold the oiler wick. Adding any significant thing in this hole would cause interference.
> I will dismantle the headstock tomorrow evening and do a full clean up.
>
> Nothing can extend out of the hole after as it receives a portion of the reverse tumbler.
> Hole is irregular and about 1/16 in dia for an included circle triangle.
> I will try JB weld as filler.  I will have a better perspective once I have the headstock on the work bench.  I have lot of brake cleaner to clean the hole. I will heat e zone once cleaned in order to clear micro asperities on surfaces after.
>
> Guy Cadrin
>
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> From: "ww_big_al" <arknack@...>
> To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
> Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:34:06 -0500
>
> I just purchased this epoxy to repair an old carburetor. Specifications
> claim it is impervious to most fluids and rigid. Nonflexible type. I have
> not used it yet but have used JB weld in the past with good results.
> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044F9JWM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_
> s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
>
> As for the repair, it depends if it is a crack or drilled through hole. I
> believe that Brake cleaner, either chlorinated or non-chlorinated would work
> well. Chlorinated is supposed to be a stronger solvent. If it is a crack, I
> would rough up the area with a burr and try to vee groove the crack. If
> possible, drill a small hole at the end of the crack for stress relief.
>
> For a hole, rough up around it and be careful not to push epoxy into your
> oil passage. Another though. If the hole was over drill, could you finish
> drilling it enough to tap it? Then Loctite in a grub screw.
>
> IL
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of
> carbure2003
> Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2020 10:47 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: [SouthBendLathe] South Bend 9A headstock lubrication issue
>
> I have a SB 9A UMD drive that has a recurring oil leak on the left spindle
> bearing.
>
> Initially I thought it was a leak on the oiler git.  Tonight I decided to
> dismantle the reverse tumbler in order to see if oil would not leak from
> under.  As soon as I removed the tumbler, the oil git drained out.
>
> I can see a hole or crack with an inspection mirror.  I recall seeing a
> post from somebody that had a similar issue. ( oil wick hole drilled too
> deep).  I will dismantle the headstock this week-end and do a full degrease
> of this zone on the casting. I cannot recall what was used in order to plug
> the hole in the previous posting.  My initial approach is to plug it with
> epoxy.  Epoxy type recommendations would be welcomed.
>
> De greasing will be done with brake cleaner or other solvents of the same
> type.  Any other suggestions on technique to be used in order to de grease
> this hole for preparation for patching?
>
> For your info, bearing never ran out of oil, no damage to the spindle or
> bearing. With the exception of this small problem, lathe is in excellent
> condition (I rebuilt the lathe when I bought it 8 years ago)
>
> Almost every components are from the original factory build (except three
> gibs that were lost, new large dials home made and thread dial that was
> missing when I got the lathe. I got a thread dial from the same machinery
> dealer.)
>
> Guy Cadrin
> Near Ottawa
> ____________________________________________________________
> She's 46, But Looks 25. This Is What She Does Every Day
> removethewrinkles.com
> http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5e4e01851c0f11846cc9st01vuc
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




 


____________________________________________________________
Sad News For Meghan Markle And Prince Harry
track.volutrk.com
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