New to me SB 10 Heavy, need help with identification


Greg
 

Afternoon all. This is my 1st time posting on this particular group, though I have been a part of the Rockwell Milling Group for some time. I recently purchased a South Bend 10 Heavy and am looking for some opinions on the machine specifics.

Someone in the distant past painted it an orange color (?) and someone else in the more recent past painted it green. I am in the process now of trying to remove all that old paint & repaint it the original gray color (as close as I can) using Ford Tractor Light Gray spray paint. So I have not powered it up yet. There was quite a bit of rust on the bare metal parts. But I have managed to get most all of it off. (Electrolysis is our friend)!  It only came with a 3-jaw chuck (Cushman 8”) & the tailstock of course. No 4-jaw or steady rest or follower rest. It did come with a set of 5 C collets & rack.

And also has a hand lever collet closer attachment which is missing some parts. (Missing the Sleeve, Knock Out Nut, Spanner, Shoe, Spring, & Snap Ring). I have no idea where to acquire these parts so if anybody out there can advise, I’d appreciate it. The shaft of the closer was pretty badly rusted & pitted, but the rest had only surface rust.

I ordered a Serial Card from Grizzly. But was later notified that that particular card “had been lost and was not recoverable”.  (Figures).

I have tried to lock down everything I can from the various South Bend as well as vintage machinery sites based on the Catalog # (CL187R) and the Serial # (11612 RKL). The vintagemachinery.org site under “10” regular lathes 1947-1983” shows that serial number as being made between 1959 and 1960. So, I assume that’s correct. The spindle thread is 2 1/4-8.  It has a 4-1/2’ bed. So if I’m deciphering this correctly, I am almost sure it is a 10 L Heavy, with a large spindle hole (which measures 1.400” and the spindle nose measures 1.600”). Does that sound correct? (The 10 L part).

As the photo shows, the cabinet it came with is the “welded steel floor leg model”.  I don’t know if that indicates that it is a “tool room model” or not (as I have seen pics with that cabinet and they were tool room models). But in the Catalog number (CL187R), there is no “8” between the CL and the 187 and I believe that is the “tool room model” indicator. I don’t know.

The brass chart plate which is (supposed to be) mounted on the outside of the cone cover is missing and was approximately 2-1/2” wide X 5” tall in size. I don’t know what that chart was & can’t seem to locate any close up pictures that would help identify it. Can anybody advise what it should be? Is it the lubrication chart (Chart #441-3) perhaps? I see different brass charts online, both originals and repros but don’t really know which chart would apply. On the underside of the cone cover is the head stock bearing adjustment plaque which is intact (though slightly painted over by the previous owner with a green fetish).

Among the various pieces of parts I found loose in a cardboard box was a gear that I can’t identify. I am wondering if it is related to the missing gear from the hand lever collet closer?? Perhaps someone out there can enlighten me. Will try to include some pics. It is a 1.000” wide gear. The OD is 2.997”. The ID is a little more difficult because it looks as though it has been worn on one side. It measures 1.940” but the worn side measures 1.949” The inside has a
.193” (3/16”) keyed slot. The gear has 40-teeth. I don’t know what it is for. (With my luck, it’s the ONE PIECE the entire lathe depends on and it’s laying in a 40-year old cardboard box).

Another item in that box (which I can’t identify) is a small plug. (Pics hopefully included). It has a step down on its OD. The measurements are: (large) OD- 1.250. (small) OD- 1.000. Thickness- 0.750. And the ‘step’ measures 0.400 on the large OD and 0.350 on the small OD. Anybody?

The electrical control box on the rear of the machine of course has a cover over it, but is missing one of the two ‘RESET’ buttons that should be there. Anybody have a clue where I may find such an item (or modern equivalent)?
Also missing is the thread dial. Threaded mounting holes are there. One even has a hex head bolt in it. But no dial. Just noticed that one. I only cut threads on a rare occasion, but will try to locate one to complete the lathe anyway. The only one’s I’m seeing right now are the 3-D printed ones. (Outside of the rare one I find on EBay that a price gouger is showing for a zillion dollars). Hate to disgrace this fine old machine with a 3-D version, but anybody out there with any experience with these 3-D ones? Are they worth having or should I keep looking?

So, it appears I’ve got a few parts to find.  Thanks for any help!  Greg


Carl Bukowsky
 

Welcome to the group. Looks like you have got a good one there.  I don’t have any answers for your questions but I’d keep searching for a SB thread dial.  I bought mine from Grizzly and it works just fine. But parts for my model SB lathe are extremely rare ( Junior model: no other SB lathe uses Junior parts!). Seriously, a 3D thread dial works, just looks odd ( painted to match your lathe makes it more pleasing!). Just saying…

Lastwagen 

Sent by my iPhone

On Jul 28, 2022, at 11:18 AM, Greg <condor6213@...> wrote:

Afternoon all. This is my 1st time posting on this particular group, though I have been a part of the Rockwell Milling Group for some time. I recently purchased a South Bend 10 Heavy and am looking for some opinions on the machine specifics.

Someone in the distant past painted it an orange color (?) and someone else in the more recent past painted it green. I am in the process now of trying to remove all that old paint & repaint it the original gray color (as close as I can) using Ford Tractor Light Gray spray paint. So I have not powered it up yet. There was quite a bit of rust on the bare metal parts. But I have managed to get most all of it off. (Electrolysis is our friend)!  It only came with a 3-jaw chuck (Cushman 8”) & the tailstock of course. No 4-jaw or steady rest or follower rest. It did come with a set of 5 C collets & rack.

And also has a hand lever collet closer attachment which is missing some parts. (Missing the Sleeve, Knock Out Nut, Spanner, Shoe, Spring, & Snap Ring). I have no idea where to acquire these parts so if anybody out there can advise, I’d appreciate it. The shaft of the closer was pretty badly rusted & pitted, but the rest had only surface rust.

I ordered a Serial Card from Grizzly. But was later notified that that particular card “had been lost and was not recoverable”.  (Figures).

I have tried to lock down everything I can from the various South Bend as well as vintage machinery sites based on the Catalog # (CL187R) and the Serial # (11612 RKL). The vintagemachinery.org site under “10” regular lathes 1947-1983” shows that serial number as being made between 1959 and 1960. So, I assume that’s correct. The spindle thread is 2 1/4-8.  It has a 4-1/2’ bed. So if I’m deciphering this correctly, I am almost sure it is a 10 L Heavy, with a large spindle hole (which measures 1.400” and the spindle nose measures 1.600”). Does that sound correct? (The 10 L part).

As the photo shows, the cabinet it came with is the “welded steel floor leg model”.  I don’t know if that indicates that it is a “tool room model” or not (as I have seen pics with that cabinet and they were tool room models). But in the Catalog number (CL187R), there is no “8” between the CL and the 187 and I believe that is the “tool room model” indicator. I don’t know.

The brass chart plate which is (supposed to be) mounted on the outside of the cone cover is missing and was approximately 2-1/2” wide X 5” tall in size. I don’t know what that chart was & can’t seem to locate any close up pictures that would help identify it. Can anybody advise what it should be? Is it the lubrication chart (Chart #441-3) perhaps? I see different brass charts online, both originals and repros but don’t really know which chart would apply. On the underside of the cone cover is the head SB no threading counter.jpgSB Power box.jpgSB Unk plug 2.jpgSB Unk plug 1.jpgSB Unk gear 3.jpgSB Unk gear 2.jpgSB Unk gear 1.jpgSB Serial Number.jpgSB Cat Number.jpgSB Collet closer.jpgSB Lathe.jpgstock bearing adjustment plaque which is intact (though slightly painted over by the previous owner with a green fetish).

Among the various pieces of parts I found loose in a cardboard box was a gear that I can’t identify. I am wondering if it is related to the missing gear from the hand lever collet closer?? Perhaps someone out there can enlighten me. Will try to include some pics. It is a 1.000” wide gear. The OD is 2.997”. The ID is a little more difficult because it looks as though it has been worn on one side. It measures 1.940” but the worn side measures 1.949” The inside has a
.193” (3/16”) keyed slot. The gear has 40-teeth. I don’t know what it is for. (With my luck, it’s the ONE PIECE the entire lathe depends on and it’s laying in a 40-year old cardboard box).

Another item in that box (which I can’t identify) is a small plug. (Pics hopefully included). It has a step down on its OD. The measurements are: (large) OD- 1.250. (small) OD- 1.000. Thickness- 0.750. And the ‘step’ measures 0.400 on the large OD and 0.350 on the small OD. Anybody?

The electrical control box on the rear of the machine of course has a cover over it, but is missing one of the two ‘RESET’ buttons that should be there. Anybody have a clue where I may find such an item (or modern equivalent)?
Also missing is the thread dial. Threaded mounting holes are there. One even has a hex head bolt in it. But no dial. Just noticed that one. I only cut threads on a rare occasion, but will try to locate one to complete the lathe anyway. The only one’s I’m seeing right now are the 3-D printed ones. (Outside of the rare one I find on EBay that a price gouger is showing for a zillion dollars). Hate to disgrace this fine old machine with a 3-D version, but anybody out there with any experience with these 3-D ones? Are they worth having or should I keep looking?

So, it appears I’ve got a few parts to find.  Thanks for any help!  Greg


Mike Poore
 

Personally, I would use oil based paint with a brush. It levels well and I believe it is how it was done originally. The thicker finish hides casting blemishes better than spray.

On 7/28/2022 11:39 AM, Greg wrote:

Afternoon all. This is my 1st time posting on this particular group, though I have been a part of the Rockwell Milling Group for some time. I recently purchased a South Bend 10 Heavy and am looking for some opinions on the machine specifics.

Someone in the distant past painted it an orange color (?) and someone else in the more recent past painted it green. I am in the process now of trying to remove all that old paint & repaint it the original gray color (as close as I can) using Ford Tractor Light Gray spray paint. So I have not powered it up yet. There was quite a bit of rust on the bare metal parts. But I have managed to get most all of it off. (Electrolysis is our friend)!  It only came with a 3-jaw chuck (Cushman 8”) & the tailstock of course. No 4-jaw or steady rest or follower rest. It did come with a set of 5 C collets & rack.

And also has a hand lever collet closer attachment which is missing some parts. (Missing the Sleeve, Knock Out Nut, Spanner, Shoe, Spring, & Snap Ring). I have no idea where to acquire these parts so if anybody out there can advise, I’d appreciate it. The shaft of the closer was pretty badly rusted & pitted, but the rest had only surface rust.

I ordered a Serial Card from Grizzly. But was later notified that that particular card “had been lost and was not recoverable”.  (Figures).

I have tried to lock down everything I can from the various South Bend as well as vintage machinery sites based on the Catalog # (CL187R) and the Serial # (11612 RKL). The vintagemachinery.org site under “10” regular lathes 1947-1983” shows that serial number as being made between 1959 and 1960. So, I assume that’s correct. The spindle thread is 2 1/4-8.  It has a 4-1/2’ bed. So if I’m deciphering this correctly, I am almost sure it is a 10 L Heavy, with a large spindle hole (which measures 1.400” and the spindle nose measures 1.600”). Does that sound correct? (The 10 L part).

As the photo shows, the cabinet it came with is the “welded steel floor leg model”.  I don’t know if that indicates that it is a “tool room model” or not (as I have seen pics with that cabinet and they were tool room models). But in the Catalog number (CL187R), there is no “8” between the CL and the 187 and I believe that is the “tool room model” indicator. I don’t know.

The brass chart plate which is (supposed to be) mounted on the outside of the cone cover is missing and was approximately 2-1/2” wide X 5” tall in size. I don’t know what that chart was & can’t seem to locate any close up pictures that would help identify it. Can anybody advise what it should be? Is it the lubrication chart (Chart #441-3) perhaps? I see different brass charts online, both originals and repros but don’t really know which chart would apply. On the underside of the cone cover is the head stock bearing adjustment plaque which is intact (though slightly painted over by the previous owner with a green fetish).

Among the various pieces of parts I found loose in a cardboard box was a gear that I can’t identify. I am wondering if it is related to the missing gear from the hand lever collet closer?? Perhaps someone out there can enlighten me. Will try to include some pics. It is a 1.000” wide gear. The OD is 2.997”. The ID is a little more difficult because it looks as though it has been worn on one side. It measures 1.940” but the worn side measures 1.949” The inside has a
.193” (3/16”) keyed slot. The gear has 40-teeth. I don’t know what it is for. (With my luck, it’s the ONE PIECE the entire lathe depends on and it’s laying in a 40-year old cardboard box).

Another item in that box (which I can’t identify) is a small plug. (Pics hopefully included). It has a step down on its OD. The measurements are: (large) OD- 1.250. (small) OD- 1.000. Thickness- 0.750. And the ‘step’ measures 0.400 on the large OD and 0.350 on the small OD. Anybody?

The electrical control box on the rear of the machine of course has a cover over it, but is missing one of the two ‘RESET’ buttons that should be there. Anybody have a clue where I may find such an item (or modern equivalent)?
Also missing is the thread dial. Threaded mounting holes are there. One even has a hex head bolt in it. But no dial. Just noticed that one. I only cut threads on a rare occasion, but will try to locate one to complete the lathe anyway. The only one’s I’m seeing right now are the 3-D printed ones. (Outside of the rare one I find on EBay that a price gouger is showing for a zillion dollars). Hate to disgrace this fine old machine with a 3-D version, but anybody out there with any experience with these 3-D ones? Are they worth having or should I keep looking?

So, it appears I’ve got a few parts to find.  Thanks for any help!  Greg


wlw19958
 

Hi There,

You definitely have a "Heavy Ten" lathe.  Yours is the 10L version (as opposed 
to the 10R).  This is born out with the catalog number '187' and the serial number
suffix code 'RKL'  Your lathe is NOT a tool room version (they were catalog # '8187'). 
But your lathe has the optional 'long' QC gearbox (which has the 'F' and 'G' tumbler
positions) which give you a greater range of threads (and feeds) to choose from. 
You also have a lever collet closer (but it is missing part of the mounting bracket
unless it is bolted to the back of the headstock and not visible in the pic).  There
should be a collet adapter sleeve that fits the inside taper of the spindle nose.

I do not recognize the gear or the 'Spud' you pictured.  I don't think they are SBL
parts. 

I do not have any experience with the 3D printed threading dials but the threading
dial is not under any stress or force so a plastic one should last a long time (and
kinder to the lead screw). 

The paint color depends on the date of manufacturer and sometimes who ordered
the lathe.  SBL would re-paint a lathe to a customer's desired color.  This would be
noted in the SBL 'build card' that you can get a copy of (I believe they sell them for
$25).  I have a 10R that I 'converted' to a 10L that was originally your color green
(I think it was made in 1953).

I'm sure you will have lots of fun with your 'new' lathe!

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Greg
 

Blue Chips, thanks much for the reply and the identification confirmation. That helps. I tried to get the serial card or 'build card' from Grizzly but, as I noted, they said that particular card had been lost so they couldn't provide it. That was part of the motivator for this post. The different colors are evident on the machine in different places where the paint is scratched or scuffed or worn away. In some places the orange shows thru and of course the green is all over it. But the original machine gray is evident under all that. So I am still in the process of slowly removing all those layers of paint so that I can get it repainted. As for the collet adapter sleeve, I don't have it. Just the pieces that are in the photo (other than the collets of course) Going to have to locate one somewhere. Greg


mike allen
 

        there's a recipe for a Sherwin-WIlliams paint in the stickys over on the Practical Machinist South Bend forum . If you do repaint make sure you use a good brush . I bought mine at a art store .

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/categories/south-bend-lathes.25/

        animal

On 7/28/2022 3:27 PM, Greg wrote:

Blue Chips, thanks much for the reply and the identification confirmation. That helps. I tried to get the serial card or 'build card' from Grizzly but, as I noted, they said that particular card had been lost so they couldn't provide it. That was part of the motivator for this post. The different colors are evident on the machine in different places where the paint is scratched or scuffed or worn away. In some places the orange shows thru and of course the green is all over it. But the original machine gray is evident under all that. So I am still in the process of slowly removing all those layers of paint so that I can get it repainted. As for the collet adapter sleeve, I don't have it. Just the pieces that are in the photo (other than the collets of course) Going to have to locate one somewhere. Greg


Andrei
 

Not to poop over people's choice of paint on their machines, but remember: once you buy it, she's yours so you can paint it any color you want. 

I have seen some horrid purple machines in places, but hey, the owners loved the color (apparently).

Moral of the story: paint it as you like. The next owner will probably do the same 🙂

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2022 8:04 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] New to me SB 10 Heavy, need help with identification
 

        there's a recipe for a Sherwin-WIlliams paint in the stickys over on the Practical Machinist South Bend forum . If you do repaint make sure you use a good brush . I bought mine at a art store .

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/categories/south-bend-lathes.25/

        animal

On 7/28/2022 3:27 PM, Greg wrote:

Blue Chips, thanks much for the reply and the identification confirmation. That helps. I tried to get the serial card or 'build card' from Grizzly but, as I noted, they said that particular card had been lost so they couldn't provide it. That was part of the motivator for this post. The different colors are evident on the machine in different places where the paint is scratched or scuffed or worn away. In some places the orange shows thru and of course the green is all over it. But the original machine gray is evident under all that. So I am still in the process of slowly removing all those layers of paint so that I can get it repainted. As for the collet adapter sleeve, I don't have it. Just the pieces that are in the photo (other than the collets of course) Going to have to locate one somewhere. Greg


ken campbell
 

congrats on your fine lathe !! ...   a lot of the fun with these old machines is in getting them going again ...

...and i bet you could trade that spiffy collet closer at least even-up for a standard wheel closer type ... to someone that is making small production runs on their 10L.  My Hardinge HC had the quick snap type like that and we made thousands of parts and really appreciated the ease and time saving.

i would have no problem with the 3d thread indicator housing ... but actually you can do threading by just keeping the thread lever in until all your cuts are done.   hah, after you do a few like that you will likely start looking for the indicator.

thanks for your story ... 

ken



 


Greg
 

Hey Ken, thanks for the suggestion. Had not thought of that. I might be tempted to do an even up trade for a standard wheel closer for 5C collets if anyone out there is interested. I don't see me using the collet system that often and a standard closer would be acceptable provided it was complete. Good idea. Thanks!


Greg
 

Hey Mike. I have had the same suggestion from several people who thought that the spray paint would not hold up to the usual oils & solvents. I found the recipe you mentioned along with another one for a color of a more blue-ish/gray. Both Sherwin Williams. I Have a Rockwell 21-100 vertical mill that has a nice machine gray color to it so I am thinking about paying a visit to my local SW store with a part of the mill along with the two recipes and pick out the one I like best. Not sure though how many quarts might be needed to do the entire machine. Any suggestions? Greg


mike allen
 

        I can't say how much ya need for the mill , but I used bout a pint on my lathe , it self-levels very nicely . Just Don't be in a hurry , let it dry & harden good before assembly . It hardens

        pretty darn good !! I think I spent @ $35.00 for 2 nice brushes , & then there's the gallon of acetone , the gallon of paint thinner ...........

        good luck .

        animal

On 7/28/2022 7:14 PM, Greg wrote:

Hey Mike. I have had the same suggestion from several people who thought that the spray paint would not hold up to the usual oils & solvents. I found the recipe you mentioned along with another one for a color of a more blue-ish/gray. Both Sherwin Williams. I Have a Rockwell 21-100 vertical mill that has a nice machine gray color to it so I am thinking about paying a visit to my local SW store with a part of the mill along with the two recipes and pick out the one I like best. Not sure though how many quarts might be needed to do the entire machine. Any suggestions? Greg


Mike Poore
 

The nice thing about using a brush is that it is easy to touch it up after you damage the finish putting it back together. You can also avoid taping. You just overlap the paint onto the machined surface and go over it with a razor to get a sharp edge. Assuming you plan to use the lathe, getting a perfect finish is sort of a waste of time as it will not be perfect for long. With that said, it seems to me that a brushed oil paint tends to dent where a sprayed finish will chip. I suppose the oil paint will eventually get just as hard and eventually chip like a sprayed finish, but I have not gotten that far yet.

The biggest negative, to me, is waiting for the paint to dry. Even when it is dry, you are better off waiting for it to harden an extra day or two before assembly. My process is to wipe it down with lacquer thinner, apply a coat, wait 3 hours, apply another coat, wait 24 hours, flip it over, and repeat the process on the other side. As you can see it would be a minimum of 48 hours before you could assemble that part.

I recently painted a 9A using about half the quart I bought to apply 2-3 coats. Some parts seemed to need a 3rd coat for full coverage. The SW recipe listed online may be correct, but it didn't look all that special to me. I don't see the blue tint. My suspicion is that we restorers spend more time worrying about the perfect paint color than the OEM ever did, so there really is no correct color as it changed from batch to batch.

On 7/28/2022 10:14 PM, Greg wrote:

Hey Mike. I have had the same suggestion from several people who thought that the spray paint would not hold up to the usual oils & solvents. I found the recipe you mentioned along with another one for a color of a more blue-ish/gray. Both Sherwin Williams. I Have a Rockwell 21-100 vertical mill that has a nice machine gray color to it so I am thinking about paying a visit to my local SW store with a part of the mill along with the two recipes and pick out the one I like best. Not sure though how many quarts might be needed to do the entire machine. Any suggestions? Greg


Greg
 

Good advice. Sounds like a new plan. As soon as I finish getting the rust problem under control, I'll head to my local Sherwin Williams dealer. Below is the other recipe I found on line that does have a blueish tint to it. I like it a lot. Greg


mike allen
 

       This picture / recipe should be in the file section somewhere . I don't know how , or I would do it .

        animal

On 7/29/2022 5:14 AM, Greg wrote:

Good advice. Sounds like a new plan. As soon as I finish getting the rust problem under control, I'll head to my local Sherwin Williams dealer. Below is the other recipe I found on line that does have a blueish tint to it. I like it a lot. Greg


wlw19958
 

Hi There,


On Fri, Jul 29, 2022 at 04:33 AM, Mike Poore wrote:
The biggest negative, to me, is waiting for the paint to dry. Even when it is dry, you are better off waiting for it to harden an extra day or two before assembly. My process is to wipe it down with lacquer thinner, apply a coat, wait 3 hours, apply another coat, wait 24 hours, flip it over, and repeat the process on the other side. As you can see it would be a minimum of 48 hours before you could assemble that part.
I find that paint doesn't really get hard until after 7 to 10 days. 
It will be dry to the touch in a couple of days but it will bruise easily.  
If you control you natural desire to assemble your lathe for a week,
you will have less touch-up to do later.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


wlw19958
 

Hi There,


On Thu, Jul 28, 2022 at 03:27 PM, Greg wrote:
The different colors are evident on the machine in different places where the paint is scratched or scuffed or worn away. In some places the orange shows thru and of course the green is all over it. But the original machine gray is evident under all that.
I think you are correct but just to be clear,  if a customer wanted a different
color,  SBL would just paint over the original color if they had a lathe in stock
that matched the order in all other respects. 

Most lathes built in the late fifties and early sixties were a grey-green color
(that is a grey with just a hint of green in it).  Having said that, the color would
vary a little from batch to batch of paint. 

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Richard Wanke
 

I used some Flood Penetrol in the SW paint when I painted my SB 9". It really helped the paint to level out and eliminate brush marks better than without the additive. I also use a printed thread dial (thanks to Brino on the Hobby-Machinest web site). I have not cut a lot of threads with it but it has worked great every time.

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 08:15:04 AM EDT, Greg <condor6213@...> wrote:


Good advice. Sounds like a new plan. As soon as I finish getting the rust problem under control, I'll head to my local Sherwin Williams dealer. Below is the other recipe I found on line that does have a blueish tint to it. I like it a lot. Greg


Richard Wanke
 

Also meant to mention that I found oven cleaner to be the easiest method of removing the old paint off mine when I was stripping it.

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 09:17:34 AM EDT, Richard Wanke <r.wanke@...> wrote:


I used some Flood Penetrol in the SW paint when I painted my SB 9". It really helped the paint to level out and eliminate brush marks better than without the additive. I also use a printed thread dial (thanks to Brino on the Hobby-Machinest web site). I have not cut a lot of threads with it but it has worked great every time.

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 08:15:04 AM EDT, Greg <condor6213@...> wrote:


Good advice. Sounds like a new plan. As soon as I finish getting the rust problem under control, I'll head to my local Sherwin Williams dealer. Below is the other recipe I found on line that does have a blueish tint to it. I like it a lot. Greg


nzpropnut
 

Lathe Guru Dennis Turk always swore by Mr Muscle Oven Cleaner for his paint stripper too!

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Wanke
Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2022 1:19 AM
To: southbendlathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] New to me SB 10 Heavy, need help with identification

 

Also meant to mention that I found oven cleaner to be the easiest method of removing the old paint off mine when I was stripping it.

 

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 09:17:34 AM EDT, Richard Wanke <r.wanke@...> wrote:

 

 

I used some Flood Penetrol in the SW paint when I painted my SB 9". It really helped the paint to level out and eliminate brush marks better than without the additive. I also use a printed thread dial (thanks to Brino on the Hobby-Machinest web site). I have not cut a lot of threads with it but it has worked great every time.

 

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 08:15:04 AM EDT, Greg <condor6213@...> wrote:

 

 

Good advice. Sounds like a new plan. As soon as I finish getting the rust problem under control, I'll head to my local Sherwin Williams dealer. Below is the other recipe I found on line that does have a blueish tint to it. I like it a lot. Greg


mike allen
 

        Dollar Tree , great source for oven cleaner. I use it on engines , equipment & motorcycles . I haven't bought any Gunk in years .

        animal

On 7/29/2022 6:19 AM, Richard Wanke wrote:

Also meant to mention that I found oven cleaner to be the easiest method of removing the old paint off mine when I was stripping it.

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 09:17:34 AM EDT, Richard Wanke <r.wanke@...> wrote:


I used some Flood Penetrol in the SW paint when I painted my SB 9". It really helped the paint to level out and eliminate brush marks better than without the additive. I also use a printed thread dial (thanks to Brino on the Hobby-Machinest web site). I have not cut a lot of threads with it but it has worked great every time.

On Friday, July 29, 2022, 08:15:04 AM EDT, Greg <condor6213@...> wrote:


Good advice. Sounds like a new plan. As soon as I finish getting the rust problem under control, I'll head to my local Sherwin Williams dealer. Below is the other recipe I found on line that does have a blueish tint to it. I like it a lot. Greg