Topics

Has any one added a mill attachment to their heavy 10?

Dave P.
 

I picked up one of these - https://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1681

and was wondering if anyone has ever attached one to their 10K.

 

I am looking for suggestions for an adapter.

 

thanks

Dave

Ruth Busch
 

I have a PALMGREN 250 on a 10L.  It slips right into the compound.  The 250 looks very similar to your adapter.


From: "Dave P." <thespamcatcher@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 10:18:05 PM
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Has any one added a mill attachment to their heavy 10?

I picked up one of these - https://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1681

and was wondering if anyone has ever attached one to their 10K.

 

I am looking for suggestions for an adapter.

 

thanks

Dave

Erik S.
 

I also have a palmgren milling attachment on my heavy 10.  I found it to move too much.  Home shop machinist article by d.e. Johnson in sept 1994 talks about improvements and how to mount.

Guenther Paul
 

I would not waist my time with a milling attachment, they are not rigid enough. Buy your self a mill you will be much happier  

GP


On Thursday, September 26, 2019, 09:37:31 AM EDT, Erik S. via Groups.Io <eriks750@...> wrote:


I also have a palmgren milling attachment on my heavy 10.  I found it to move too much.  Home shop machinist article by d.e. Johnson in sept 1994 talks about improvements and how to mount.

Jim_B
 

 I agree with Paul to a large extent. The money spent on an attachment would make a large dent in the cost of a small mill. 
I had a Burke #4 for many years. I sold it to get ready for our move to the “Olde Folks Home”. I wish I had not. 

But from time to time I need to do just a bit of milling. 

I am making a catch pan for the MG. The MG XPAG engine has a design issue that allows the rear main seal to drip oil when the engine is not running. 

Without pulling the engine and installing a modern seal, the historic fix is to add a pan that catches the oil as it drips, thus saving the garage floor. On mine I wanted to add a sight glass to see when to drain the pan. 
The pan will be made out of Al and folded and welded. The fittings for the sight glass will be welded to the side of the Pan. They needed a flat milled for welding. 

I have used a QCTP tool holder in the past as a rudimentary work holder. 

In this case I am holding a 1/2” rod, about 24” long in the tool holder. I have made several 1/32 deep passes to get a flat about 3/16 deep. 
With it still in the holder I will find center and then drill a #27 hole, in the vertical face, about 5/32 under the step, about 1/2” deep. Thats a hole that is not on center and could be difficult in another setting. The rod was then put in to the spindle, a 5/32 hole drilled in the face about 1/16 from the face. The adapter was then parted off and a 1/16 NPT thread drilled and tapped in the unmilled end. 


There is a similar adapter going on the top of the catch pan, shown to the right. This has a double step milled. 

I have not made the pan yet. I am still fitting cardboard test pieces to the curves on the bell housing., but here is what the sight gage will look like when I get the pan fabricated. 

 
Oh yes, a friend will do the TIG welding. I got rid of my welding stuff also. 😢

BI just wanted to share a possible way to do a little mill work on your lathe. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Sep 26, 2019, at 2:13 PM, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

I would not waist my time with a milling attachment, they are not rigid enough. Buy your self a mill you will be much happier  

GP


On Thursday, September 26, 2019, 09:37:31 AM EDT, Erik S. via Groups.Io <eriks750@...> wrote:


I also have a palmgren milling attachment on my heavy 10.  I found it to move too much.  Home shop machinist article by d.e. Johnson in sept 1994 talks about improvements and how to mount.


--
Jim B

Guenther Paul
 

I will have a HF big red for sale when i get my new mill with a 50" table set up. Have to do some major remodeling in my shop 

GP


On Thursday, September 26, 2019, 07:58:07 PM EDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


 I agree with Paul to a large extent. The money spent on an attachment would make a large dent in the cost of a small mill. 
I had a Burke #4 for many years. I sold it to get ready for our move to the “Olde Folks Home”. I wish I had not. 

But from time to time I need to do just a bit of milling. 

I am making a catch pan for the MG. The MG XPAG engine has a design issue that allows the rear main seal to drip oil when the engine is not running. 

Without pulling the engine and installing a modern seal, the historic fix is to add a pan that catches the oil as it drips, thus saving the garage floor. On mine I wanted to add a sight glass to see when to drain the pan. 
The pan will be made out of Al and folded and welded. The fittings for the sight glass will be welded to the side of the Pan. They needed a flat milled for welding. 

I have used a QCTP tool holder in the past as a rudimentary work holder. 

In this case I am holding a 1/2” rod, about 24” long in the tool holder. I have made several 1/32 deep passes to get a flat about 3/16 deep. 
With it still in the holder I will find center and then drill a #27 hole, in the vertical face, about 5/32 under the step, about 1/2” deep. Thats a hole that is not on center and could be difficult in another setting. The rod was then put in to the spindle, a 5/32 hole drilled in the face about 1/16 from the face. The adapter was then parted off and a 1/16 NPT thread drilled and tapped in the unmilled end. 


There is a similar adapter going on the top of the catch pan, shown to the right. This has a double step milled. 

I have not made the pan yet. I am still fitting cardboard test pieces to the curves on the bell housing., but here is what the sight gage will look like when I get the pan fabricated. 

 
Oh yes, a friend will do the TIG welding. I got rid of my welding stuff also. 😢

BI just wanted to share a possible way to do a little mill work on your lathe. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Sep 26, 2019, at 2:13 PM, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

I would not waist my time with a milling attachment, they are not rigid enough. Buy your self a mill you will be much happier  

GP


On Thursday, September 26, 2019, 09:37:31 AM EDT, Erik S. via Groups.Io <eriks750@...> wrote:


I also have a palmgren milling attachment on my heavy 10.  I found it to move too much.  Home shop machinist article by d.e. Johnson in sept 1994 talks about improvements and how to mount.


--
Jim B

Bill in OKC too
 

Very nice work, Jim. Thanks for posting that!

Bill in OKC

On Thursday, September 26, 2019, 6:58:19 PM CDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


 I agree with Paul to a large extent. The money spent on an attachment would make a large dent in the cost of a small mill. 
I had a Burke #4 for many years. I sold it to get ready for our move to the “Olde Folks Home”. I wish I had not. 

But from time to time I need to do just a bit of milling. 

I am making a catch pan for the MG. The MG XPAG engine has a design issue that allows the rear main seal to drip oil when the engine is not running. 

Without pulling the engine and installing a modern seal, the historic fix is to add a pan that catches the oil as it drips, thus saving the garage floor. On mine I wanted to add a sight glass to see when to drain the pan. 
The pan will be made out of Al and folded and welded. The fittings for the sight glass will be welded to the side of the Pan. They needed a flat milled for welding. 

I have used a QCTP tool holder in the past as a rudimentary work holder. 

In this case I am holding a 1/2” rod, about 24” long in the tool holder. I have made several 1/32 deep passes to get a flat about 3/16 deep. 
With it still in the holder I will find center and then drill a #27 hole, in the vertical face, about 5/32 under the step, about 1/2” deep. Thats a hole that is not on center and could be difficult in another setting. The rod was then put in to the spindle, a 5/32 hole drilled in the face about 1/16 from the face. The adapter was then parted off and a 1/16 NPT thread drilled and tapped in the unmilled end. 


There is a similar adapter going on the top of the catch pan, shown to the right. This has a double step milled. 

I have not made the pan yet. I am still fitting cardboard test pieces to the curves on the bell housing., but here is what the sight gage will look like when I get the pan fabricated. 

 
Oh yes, a friend will do the TIG welding. I got rid of my welding stuff also. 😢

BI just wanted to share a possible way to do a little mill work on your lathe. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Sep 26, 2019, at 2:13 PM, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

I would not waist my time with a milling attachment, they are not rigid enough. Buy your self a mill you will be much happier  

GP


On Thursday, September 26, 2019, 09:37:31 AM EDT, Erik S. via Groups.Io <eriks750@...> wrote:


I also have a palmgren milling attachment on my heavy 10.  I found it to move too much.  Home shop machinist article by d.e. Johnson in sept 1994 talks about improvements and how to mount.


--
Jim B

Stephen Bartlett
 

When I bought my 9C it was set up with a T slot cross slide. It used a hand lever for the cross motion (which did not fit properly). A regular cross slide was included, but there was no cross feed screw or compound rest. I bought a new compound rest and cross feed screw from a local SB outlet.

Then I bought a Palmgren milling attachment. I tried mounting it on the compound rest with a lantern tool post and it was very springy. I then mounted it to the T slot cross slide using T nuts, heavy bolts, and a heavy steel bar across the milling attachment's feet. That made it quite solid but I was doing only light milling.

The only downside was the nuisance of changing cross slides.

Steve Bartlett

Dave P.
 

Thanks for the responses.
Just and FYI, I do have a mid size mill, just not a lot of experience. The milling attachment was basically free as I got it with all of the stuff I bought from the widow of a friend a few years ago. The reason I thought about putting the milling attachment on the lathe was - I had something mounted in the mill already - mounting can be a major undertaking with the stuff and experience I have and I needed to make a quick part, but I didn't want to loose my reference on the mounted part - so I thought I would try doing it on the lathe instead, which was problematic since the milling attachment did not come with an adapter as far as I know.

Next thing to add to the small project  list is a way to drill proper holes in the sides of parts mounted in the lathe since I don't seem to be very good at going from the lathe to the drill press and getting holes drilled correctly. I am talking about holes on the circumference of parts done on the lathe, not in line with the Z axis. I have a rotary table for the mill, but I have not figured out how to use and mount it correctly yet, but that would be a big help I think.

Thanks again
Dave

Jim_B
 

I like to use the QCTP as a mount for almost any shop made attachment for my lathe. 

Here is my TP mounted “cross Drilling” fixture.
It used a chuck I had kicking around for over 30 years. 
Once set on center you can take it off or put it back without any additional work. 
I have modified it from the pictures by adding another bearing to extend the support. 
It can also be set parallel to the ways and used to drill a cirular BCD pattern. 


The Hex piece could be round. I had a chunk of hex. 
There is a slot milled in the hex. The “L” shaped holder fits the slit and is silver brazed into it. This keeps the L piece and hex “True” to each other. 

The sleeve is a sintered bronze bushing. The rod is OD ground. 
Picture shows it on a Heavy 10 but I have used it on my 9” workshop also. 

Prime power is a Dewalt Portable drill. 


I believe I have posted this before on the old site. Excuse repetition. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Sep 27, 2019, at 9:31 AM, Dave P. <thespamcatcher@...> wrote:

Thanks for the responses.
J
Next thing to add to the small project  list is a way to drill proper holes in the sides of parts mounted in the lathe since I don't seem to be very good at going from the lathe to the drill press and getting holes drilled correctly. I am talking about holes on the circumference of parts done on the lathe, not in line with the Z axis. 
Thanks again
Dave


--
Jim B

Dave Eggebraaten (AF5IA)
 

Elegant Simplicity!!!

On 9/27/2019 10:03 AM, Jim_B wrote:
I like to use the QCTP as a mount for almost any shop made attachment for my lathe. 

Here is my TP mounted “cross Drilling” fixture.
It used a chuck I had kicking around for over 30 years. 
Once set on center you can take it off or put it back without any additional work. 
I have modified it from the pictures by adding another bearing to extend the support. 
It can also be set parallel to the ways and used to drill a cirular BCD pattern. 


The Hex piece could be round. I had a chunk of hex. 
There is a slot milled in the hex. The “L” shaped holder fits the slit and is silver brazed into it. This keeps the L piece and hex “True” to each other. 

The sleeve is a sintered bronze bushing. The rod is OD ground. 
Picture shows it on a Heavy 10 but I have used it on my 9” workshop also. 

Prime power is a Dewalt Portable drill. 


I believe I have posted this before on the old site. Excuse repetition. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Sep 27, 2019, at 9:31 AM, Dave P. <thespamcatcher@...> wrote:

Thanks for the responses.
J
Next thing to add to the small project  list is a way to drill proper holes in the sides of parts mounted in the lathe since I don't seem to be very good at going from the lathe to the drill press and getting holes drilled correctly. I am talking about holes on the circumference of parts done on the lathe, not in line with the Z axis. 
Thanks again
Dave


--
Jim B